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Chinese Utility e-bikes

Old 08-20-21, 11:02 AM
  #51  
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Thanks for the pics; looks like a massive battery and big DD motor on the Amazon vehicle, but still relatively narrow.
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Old 09-11-21, 10:07 AM
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I've put about 1900 miles (3000km) within the last 8 months, had one flat tire, disc brake pads are making some noise, very little maintenance needed.
I only leave one battery on this e-bike at a time, the range of single battery is about 50-60 mile, that's carrying 50-60 lb. of additional weight besides the rider (180 lb.)
I just lube the chain, put air in tires and keep riding it. I was hoping to wear out the knobby rear tire to replace it with some narrower, less noisy, more street oriented tire, but still in decent shape after nearly 2k mi.
Fat tires are really overkill for urban, pavement riding.
With new school year starting next Monday, more students, more volume of food to carry than I can load onto the cargo e-bike; likely I will have less trips with the cargo e-bike.
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Old 12-12-21, 12:13 PM
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As a commuter in NYC metro, I find this video interesting:
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Old 12-12-21, 02:50 PM
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Vast differences between most industrialized countries that provide viable mass transit options, including 200 mph electric trains, and the USA where many highways are only legal for people driving a motor vehicle. That did not happen by accident as a company was formed after World War II to buy up and dismantle all the nation's electric street car companies, burning the street cars and ripping up the tracks.

Even in cities there is the problem of having half the land being dedicated to motor vehicles and allowing on street parking which makes it much more dangerous for cyclists. Cargo trailers do not make the situation any better as they are going to tie up an entire lane in cities although this has long been a problem with the full size trucks used by UPS, FedEx, and now Amazon, to deliver packages.
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Old 12-12-21, 04:47 PM
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The difference is the mentality.
Most Americans are used to driving everywhere, even if it is 2 or 5 mile away to a store to pick up groceries.
In large American cities that have the mass transit available, you still have most motorized vehicles that have single occupant and no passenger.
Without a bike lane taking up the roads or streets, there will be just more cars, no reduction in drivers, no increase in mass transits usage.
Additionally, most Americans consider bikes, ebikes or motorcycles as toys; they don't belong on the roads, they are not considered alternatives to cars.
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Old 12-14-21, 10:52 AM
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Talking

Looks like you got a great deal and just need tougher street oriented tires.. I am going to replace mine with this MC/Scooter tire as I am very familiar with the tire company using them on my MC. https://www.amazon.com/Shinko-SR241-...9500819&sr=8-1
Love the blue paint job - kinda looks like a blue simpler RAD bike.. :^)
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Old 12-14-21, 02:19 PM
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I'm familiar with similar Shinko rear tire on my 1978 Honda Trail90 scrambler:


The OEM tires that came with the cargo ebike are just too noisy for me.
After changing the front end, it was much better, I just kept the rear tire as is until it wears out, but with +2k miles on it this year, it is still holding up.
Rear tire noise is not as bad as having a front noisy tire.
Really lucked out with this cargo ebike purchase, the order was placed just before the pandemic got bad and the ebike arrived when the world was still quarantined.
I got to ride the cargo ebike on more empty streets than the usual NYC metro.
I'm happy with the Alibaba purchase experience overall, it is certainly not for everyone.
With the supply chain and oversea shipping backlog issues, buying ebikes directly from Chinese manufacturers may be something to avoid for now.
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Old 12-14-21, 05:30 PM
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Too bad Honda can't replicate the Scrambler. What a great bike. I had a Honda 125 about that time, and it was a fantastic little bike.
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Old 12-15-21, 09:26 AM
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I had a 1973 Honda CL350 Scrambler that a traded some welding equipment for.

For a vintage 350cc engine, it was ok for modern street usage, as long as I'm not in a hurry to get to place.
Suspensions were really soft, but it always turned heads wherever it's parked. Even had a GPS mounted on it.
I got it running and put about 14k miles on it before the head gasket blew, still sold it for more than I spent on it.

The Trail90 that I converted to Scrambler was a sad sod to begin with:

I ditched the seized up engine for a 140cc Chinese engine with 4-speed & clutch.
Extended swingam, fuel tank from a Yamaha, converted to 12v system and much more..


Vintage Hondas are fun to toy around and easy to maintain.
They seem to have become novelty vehicles now, with a cult following, collectable value is high in them.
But for practicality, ebikes can be just as capable and without the need for licensing, registration, inspection & insurance to operate.
Road rules are also 'bendable' when you operate an ebike.

Even the Australian Po/mail services are phasing out the old Posties:
https://www.theguardian.com/australi...cycles-by-2025

Last edited by cat0020; 12-15-21 at 11:14 AM.
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Old 12-30-21, 10:18 AM
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Countries around the world have consumed cheap goods from China for decades,
now we all start to pay a price, economically & environmentally.
It's rude awakening for America especially, increase in prices will likely be a common place for years to come, not just in ebike market.
https://electrek.co/2021/12/29/large...across-lineup/
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Old 12-30-21, 11:19 AM
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My son purchased a "Rad" for his wife as a Christmas present, and it's perfect for her. It's powerful enough for her to ride my 10 year old granddaughter on the back. These bikes, while not for everyone, aren't going away. The price was reasonable with $200 off when he purchased it. My only problem with rear hub systems is they are murder on my body when ridden over uneven terrain, a problem that wasn't evident with a front hub.
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Old 12-30-21, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by cat0020
The difference is the mentality.
Most Americans are used to driving everywhere, even if it is 2 or 5 mile away to a store to pick up groceries.
In large American cities that have the mass transit available, you still have most motorized vehicles that have single occupant and no passenger.
Without a bike lane taking up the roads or streets, there will be just more cars, no reduction in drivers, no increase in mass transits usage.
Additionally, most Americans consider bikes, ebikes or motorcycles as toys; they don't belong on the roads, they are not considered alternatives to cars.
Not true when choices have been removed by profit maximizing corporations. City lot sizes and dimensions changed when trolley car lines were removed and cars took their place by default. I walked or bikes to school for 12 years but today it is often not safe for children or adults to walk or bicycle anywhere. The interstate highway system foolishly promoted by President Eisenhower made matters far worse. While Europe and Asia build light rail and high speed trains the U.S. government funded freeways which cut cities in half and forced people into cars. Even where I attended college a pork project that benefited only local contractors was done to build a 12 lane freeway through a town of 7,000 people. Students that walked or biked to campus were forced to buy cars which is not a trivial expensve for a student. I spent my last year in college as a homeless person as I could not afford both a car and to pay rent for an apartment.

It is also not appreciated that the "flight" to the suburbs were race based as white parents wanted to move to whites only enclaves and protect their children from exposure to children of color. This is still going on and why the big push for charter schools to continue with racial segregation that is so important to weaken workers in this country and keep them enslaved and living paycheck to paycheck. People have been deluded into thinking that they actually have a choice and live in a democracy.
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Old 12-30-21, 03:08 PM
  #63  
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Originally Posted by Calsun
Not true when choices have been removed by profit maximizing corporations. City lot sizes and dimensions changed when trolley car lines were removed and cars took their place by default. I walked or bikes to school for 12 years but today it is often not safe for children or adults to walk or bicycle anywhere. The interstate highway system foolishly promoted by President Eisenhower made matters far worse. While Europe and Asia build light rail and high speed trains the U.S. government funded freeways which cut cities in half and forced people into cars. Even where I attended college a pork project that benefited only local contractors was done to build a 12 lane freeway through a town of 7,000 people. Students that walked or biked to campus were forced to buy cars which is not a trivial expensve for a student. I spent my last year in college as a homeless person as I could not afford both a car and to pay rent for an apartment.

It is also not appreciated that the "flight" to the suburbs were race based as white parents wanted to move to whites only enclaves and protect their children from exposure to children of color. This is still going on and why the big push for charter schools to continue with racial segregation that is so important to weaken workers in this country and keep them enslaved and living paycheck to paycheck. People have been deluded into thinking that they actually have a choice and live in a democracy.
What part of what I said is not true? can you specify?
The "flight" to the suburbs is the reason that most Americans are used to driving individual vehicles instead of using public transport, mass transit or bicycling.
Which are likely not widely available or safe in most suburbs, because most drivers think bicycles & motorcycles are just toys that don't belong on the roads.
Note that I specified 'most Americans' in my previous post, not you specifically as an outlier.
What you described in your personal experience does not reflect the majority of America.
I'm no stranger to sleeping in cars or being hungry enough to eat from garbage cans. .
Whatever racial divide that occurs in America is not delusion, it is designed maintain what always has been, since Columbus.
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Old 01-02-22, 12:34 PM
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Production volume allows lower pricing..
$1800 USD for belt-drive, dual battery, 500w motor (for US market), this bike speaks utility for sure:
https://electrek.co/2022/01/02/chine...#disqus_thread
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Old 01-25-22, 08:00 AM
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This is what Rad Power Bikes should have done in the first place for the RadRunner:
Large battery capacity, cast wheels, 7-speed and low price point.
https://electrek.co/2022/01/24/new-f...-key-upgrades/
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Old 02-04-22, 09:50 AM
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Another less-expensive option to cargo ebikes:
https://electrek.co/2022/02/04/eunor...r-replacement/
24" wheels & non-fat tires would be great for pavement riding with heavy loads.
Nearly $2700 when equipped with the largest battery capacity (31AH combined) configuration.

Last edited by cat0020; 03-01-22 at 08:05 AM.
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Old 03-06-22, 11:43 AM
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Some are good picks.. even for cargo ebikes:

Here are the best electric bikes you can buy at every price level in March 2022

https://electrek.co/2022/03/06/here-...y-price-level/
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Old 03-18-22, 07:04 PM
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I've always wanted a Radrunner since it came out, but the lack of gears really prevented me from getting one, since the area that I ride involve some hills.
750w hub motor has plenty of acceleration from stop.
Suspension fork has some damping element, not sure if there is top-out bumper or hydraulic, but it is nice & smooth through its travel.
The Fiido T1 comes with a pretty large chainring, I guess they have this bike cruising at 20 mph with low cadence required from the rider.
I didn't have any problem removing the battery at all, the seatpost quick release clamp area is a little tight, but not so tight that it would prevent the battery to be removed.
Below is the lowest seat height for the T1, I'm 5'9", I could stand over the seat at the lowest seat height, but with shorter legged rider, there might be a problem finding a good fit.
Suspension seatpost is very long, about 550mm, I think it weighs over 5 lb., too. Likely the first place to lose weight from the T1.
I replaced the OEM front axle to a quick-release axle, just make it easier on myself to take front wheel on & off the bike.
I like the cast wheels, not much heavier than spoked wheels, but likely last longer without maintenance.


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Old 03-27-22, 06:13 PM
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You do not need any import license to bring products into the USA from China. You do need to work with a freight forwarding company that has US and China offices to manage the shipment and pay the fees involved.

I have been importing products from China on a regular basis for the past 12 years. Last year the ocean freight companies, which have a virtual monopoly, increase rates by more than 400%. A shipment that was costing $900 in 2020 is now costing use more than $4,000. Even without the Trump tax on imports from China the ocean freight costs now in place are a killer. Delivery times are now in the months so ordering the bikes tomorrow and you might have them for Christmas.

Retailers are indicating for many Shimano parts that they do not expect to have them in stock until December of 2022. And the dollar has continued to fall and so the Yen is 9% higher versus the U.S. dollar than it was last fall. Same is true for the Taiwan dollar (which will affect the price of Giant and Specialized and other bikes and bike components) and the Chinese Yuan which is up 11% over the U.S. dollar in the past year.
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Old 03-28-22, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Calsun
You do not need any import license to bring products into the USA from China. You do need to work with a freight forwarding company that has US and China offices to manage the shipment and pay the fees involved.

I have been importing products from China on a regular basis for the past 12 years. Last year the ocean freight companies, which have a virtual monopoly, increase rates by more than 400%. A shipment that was costing $900 in 2020 is now costing use more than $4,000. Even without the Trump tax on imports from China the ocean freight costs now in place are a killer. Delivery times are now in the months so ordering the bikes tomorrow and you might have them for Christmas.

Retailers are indicating for many Shimano parts that they do not expect to have them in stock until December of 2022. And the dollar has continued to fall and so the Yen is 9% higher versus the U.S. dollar than it was last fall. Same is true for the Taiwan dollar (which will affect the price of Giant and Specialized and other bikes and bike components) and the Chinese Yuan which is up 11% over the U.S. dollar in the past year.
Thanks; great information. I don't deal with China (even though having many things from there since it seems easier, more cost effective and more feasible to deal with US suppliers even if they just repackage.
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Old 03-29-22, 07:34 AM
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No doubt shipping ebikes in containers are costing more these days, along with the time frame of container processing from China through US ports.
Luckily, I bought my cargo ebike in OCT/NOV 2020, just before the pandemic, delivery was made in FEB 2021.
US dependency of cheap goods from China is not going to change significantly in the near future.
Decades of importing cheap goods from China is finally come to reveal the issues.
Unless US is willing to restart its manufacturing might, ignore the consequences of environmental impact of mass manufacturing and pay fair living labor wages;
even then, the prices for goods are still going to be far more expensive than Chinese import.
You can say that you don't deal with China, but plenty of things in your household still are made in China, depended on Chinese manufactured parts or raw materials;
even if they have a "Made in the USA" label.
Personally, I buy what's available at less costly prices that suits my purpose; regardless where it is made, or where it is from.
These ebikes really are not that complicated, electronically & mechanically, and the parameters that I use these ebikes are not extremely demanding.
Even when issues occur, I can usually fix thing myself or not have to depend on US suppliers to get stuff working again.
The wonderful thing about the internet: you can learn how to fix just about anything yourself; with proper tools & spare parts.
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Old 04-21-22, 06:35 PM
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Europeans already love electric cargo bikes, and now Americans are embracing these low-cost car alternatives

https://electrek.co/2022/04/21/europ...-alternatives/
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Old 05-07-22, 02:31 PM
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PAS 80 mile range.. with 2.5 batteries.. looks heavy..
https://electrek.co/2022/05/07/fucar...or-long-range/

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Old 05-07-22, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by cat0020
Europeans already love electric cargo bikes, and now Americans are embracing these low-cost car alternatives

https://electrek.co/2022/04/21/europ...-alternatives/
Bike riders in most European cites find much safer streets and it is by design. In the USA the auto is king and on public streets taxpayer subsidized vehicle parking is everywhere. Bicyclists are squeezed into narrow bike lanes and have to deal with car mirrors and people opening their car doors with looking. In many cities in Europe there are streets in shopping districts where motorized vehicles are not allowed during business hours and so the streets are in use by pedestrians and bicyclists.

Over my lifetime the streets in the USA have become much morel dangerous with drivers going past at high speeds and often focused on their hamburger, cup of coffee, or hand held cell phone than the road ahead. A bicyclist is considered to be a nuisance with no right to be on the streets.

When I do ride on city streets I find it safest during the night as their are far fewer motorists and less exhaust to inhale and it is usually cooler.
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Old 05-07-22, 04:59 PM
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As a bicyclist for over 30 years in the USA, I agree that bicycles (& motorcycles) are mostly considered as toys in the USA, most motorists feel that they don't belong on public roads.

I've worked as a bicycle messenger in Seattle & SF, CA, have had my fair share of close calls, door prizes; I'm used to commuting on my bicycle in NYC metro since 2013.
Filtering through between car mirrors in traffic is no particular concerning, but at night when visibility is low is when I become more careful.

Generally, I prefer a small folding bike for riding in the city traffic; smaller bike = smaller target to get hit, also lower speed (below 20 mph).
With the cargo ebike, motorists tend to give me more room to maneuver in traffic, important thing is to make yourself seen in traffic;
by being visible with lights & color you wear, or by the way you ride.

Just make sure you always have an way out to avoid impact, even if it means to jump the curb or ride at the opposite side of the road. It's kept me alive & accident free for decades.
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