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Rigid or Shock fork

Old 05-11-20, 06:20 AM
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Stateguy
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Rigid or Shock fork

I mostly ride trails and few times a year the beach
I am looking into a new fat bike and wondering if I should get a shock fork
i here with low tire pressure is like a shock fork. But not keen on riding real low tire pressure(have a lot of large roots and small stumps)
so what is your opinion on type of bike and type of fork to buy for the riding I do
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Old 05-11-20, 08:49 AM
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Duplicate threads merged
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Old 05-11-20, 08:55 PM
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I'm happy with my Mayor with CF fork. I actually get more annoyed by a rigid rear when riding over roots etc. Especially on flats where getting out of the saddle isn't what I want.

To me, I think either good rigid with good geometry, or full suspension. A hardtail is just an in between compromise. Obviously you can't make a bike FS after the fact.

YMMV
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Old 05-14-20, 12:34 PM
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I like both, one thing to consider are that fat forks are really heavy but will smooth out your ride. Even with low pressures, it can't avoid a sometimes bouncy effect as the tires don't have progression like the forks.
If I were you, I'd start with a carbon fork, then upgrade as needed. Most don't need front suspension, you'll save money and weight to spend on a better bike.
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Old 05-31-20, 10:34 PM
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The huge tires should adequately take all the shock but that’s me. If you like having front suspension that is cool.
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Old 06-07-20, 09:46 AM
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Fat tires are not the same as a suspension fork or rear shock. Yes, if you run the tires super low you get a couple inches of suspension, but it is undamped, uncontrolled travel. Fine for when you are going slow (snow, sand, mud) but I find things get sketchy when speed picks up in drier and faster environments. Its like a beach ball bouncing down the trail. I end up running higher pressure then.

My fat bike is rigid, but I mostly just ride it in adverse conditions (snow, mud, muck). Were I to ride it as my year-round bike on rough single-track, Id want suspension on the front.

I do ride the rigid fatty occasionally in the dry months just to change things up and make a boring trail interesting again, but it would never be my main ride.... Id want a front fork on it for that. I would likely swap to rigid in the winter, though. Less to maintain in the adverse conditions.
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Old 06-08-20, 09:51 AM
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A rigid fork is less rigid than a normal rigid mountain bike, but the damping control is still on you. If you will be riding lots of jump lines, get a suspension fork (or better yet a jump bike). If your riding will be as much pedal powered as gravity powered, get a rigid.
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Old 06-16-20, 10:35 PM
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what tire pressure do you use on road? on trails?
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Old 06-17-20, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by rmnrapido View Post
what tire pressure do you use on road? on trails?
There is no one answer to that. Somewhere between 4 and 20 psi. Depends on the tire and where I am riding. The correct pressure for sand dunes will have the bike self steering like it has 2 flat tires when you roll onto pavement with it.
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Old 06-17-20, 10:08 PM
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For my fat bike, I have rigid. I mostly do river beds with sand and water, not sure how long suspension forks would last in that environment. As far as trails go, my concern would be the "spongyness" of a low pressure fat tire added to the suspension fork, might be risky on downhill braking and curves.
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Old 06-25-20, 07:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
Fat tires are not the same as a suspension fork or rear shock. Yes, if you run the tires super low you get a couple inches of suspension, but it is undamped, uncontrolled travel. Fine for when you are going slow (snow, sand, mud) but I find things get sketchy when speed picks up in drier and faster environments. Its like a beach ball bouncing down the trail. I end up running higher pressure then.

My fat bike is rigid, but I mostly just ride it in adverse conditions (snow, mud, muck). Were I to ride it as my year-round bike on rough single-track, Id want suspension on the front.

I do ride the rigid fatty occasionally in the dry months just to change things up and make a boring trail interesting again, but it would never be my main ride.... Id want a front fork on it for that. I would likely swap to rigid in the winter, though. Less to maintain in the adverse conditions.
^^^So much this.

Some people have a hard time understanding that fat tires do not replace suspension.
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Old 07-03-20, 10:01 AM
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The other problem with running pressures low enough to emulate proper suspension is self steer which can be pretty terrible with certain tires. I can't run below 8psi in the front because the handling gets really weird below that but I'd need around 5 - 6psi to properly take the hits up front.

In our rooty rock gardens I got fed up with bouncing around constantly and got a Manitou Mastodon Pro EXT. It has now 140mm travel and I could not be happier. I can now confidently ride even the most technical downhill sections as long as they're not too steep (don't have a dropper yet and I'm not a fan of stopping + adjusting my seat height every time there's a hill).

I'm starting to think the front suspended fatbike might be the mountain bike to end all other mountain bikes (for me). But if the frame ever breaks I'm going full squish. Having suspension in the rear would make the fatbike a monster.
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