Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fatbikes
Reload this Page >

Fat bike and sand

Notices
Fatbikes Designed for use in sand, mud or snow, Fat bikes are the right choice for true all-terrain riding. Check here for the latest on these fun, adventurous two-wheeled machines.

Fat bike and sand

Old 11-30-23, 11:33 PM
  #26  
Senior Member
 
MarcusT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: NE Italy
Posts: 1,637
Liked 633 Times in 354 Posts
Seems to be a good bike. Components look higher end. It looks to be a small, hope it fits.
Use a dry lube so sand does not get glued to every thing.
Tell us your impressions
Enjoy
PS. Are you the thread starter or did you just piggy back on?
MarcusT is offline  
Old 12-01-23, 04:57 PM
  #27  
^ * * ^ * * ^
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: FL USA
Posts: 165

Bikes: 1977 Tom Kellogg Nr. 27 - 1984 Bob Jackson - 1987 Alpineer - 1999 Bianchi - 2002 LeMond Buenos Aries- 2007 Specialized Tarmac Pro - 2017 Mongoose Argus Comp FatBike - 2024 Gravity 29er 1-Speed Monstercross

Liked 295 Times in 94 Posts
Went out for an hour or so today. The bike performed great. No problem with the sand really. A lot of it is 'crusted' and very easy to ride on (even with my 29x2.35 tire gravel bike) but there are many loose soft sand sections. The main activity in this area is horseback riding so there are hoof prints that are a bit of a PITA. But there seems to be nothing you can't really ride through if the gear is low enough (I was surprised I used the small chainring a few times!). But make no mistake, fat bike riding in general is a big effort. I don't have a gauge accurate enough to measure low pressures. So I put 10psi in and then lowered them by feel, guessing that I had maybe 8psi. So there are some gains to be had for sure with pressures.






Now for the problem. This is a completely natural area with fire roads that are rarely driven on. These aren't trails so to speak. So there's vegetation of all sorts growing in the sand. And one of these plants does not like to be ridden on. Thorns, thorns, and more thorns. Both tires were covered at the end of the ride. They're actually embedded in the rubber. I pulled them out individually with tweezers No flats, they're quite small. But I'm thinking best-case-scenario, i'd have to spend 30 minutes after every ride pulling thorns. I need to identify exactly which plant is the culprit and see if they can be mostly avoided.


Last edited by cegerer; 12-02-23 at 06:42 AM.
cegerer is offline  
Likes For cegerer:
Old 12-02-23, 07:24 PM
  #28  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,220
Liked 771 Times in 457 Posts
Originally Posted by cegerer



Oh yeah, I remember sand like that.
No way that'll work with a smaller tire.
Consider 5 PSI as a starting point. (going by feel is actually not a bad technique, If i can push to the rim, I add a few pumps)

As for those stickers... (burrs, thorns)
Good luck. Hated those things. Probably won't pierce the tire, but consider a patch kit and pump just in case.
CrimsonEclipse is offline  
Old 12-03-23, 06:52 PM
  #29  
^ * * ^ * * ^
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: FL USA
Posts: 165

Bikes: 1977 Tom Kellogg Nr. 27 - 1984 Bob Jackson - 1987 Alpineer - 1999 Bianchi - 2002 LeMond Buenos Aries- 2007 Specialized Tarmac Pro - 2017 Mongoose Argus Comp FatBike - 2024 Gravity 29er 1-Speed Monstercross

Liked 295 Times in 94 Posts
^^^ Thanks. Without the horse hoof divots in that trail, it would be awesome. Still not bad even with them. Also, I ordered the Fatty Stripper kit and am converting to tubeless. Next ride I'm going to play around with pressures and see what happens. "pushing to the rim and adding a few pumps" is a LOT lower than what I was running. I'll give that a try.
cegerer is offline  
Old 12-04-23, 11:08 PM
  #30  
Senior Member
 
MarcusT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: NE Italy
Posts: 1,637
Liked 633 Times in 354 Posts
Originally Posted by cegerer
^^^ Thanks. Without the horse hoof divots in that trail, it would be awesome. Still not bad even with them. Also, I ordered the Fatty Stripper kit and am converting to tubeless. Next ride I'm going to play around with pressures and see what happens. "pushing to the rim and adding a few pumps" is a LOT lower than what I was running. I'll give that a try.
If the path is too divoty(?), I would just go over the brush. That bike 's only limitations are your legs
MarcusT is offline  
Old 12-05-23, 12:29 AM
  #31  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,220
Liked 771 Times in 457 Posts
Originally Posted by MarcusT
If the path is too divoty(?), I would just go over the brush. That bike 's only limitations are your legs
There is a lot of truth to your statement, the bike is a tank and will traverse anything.
But being Florida, the brush has stickers, now at shin/thigh/arm height, along with much more thorny plants, and spiders snakes and occasionally gator.
CrimsonEclipse is offline  
Old 12-10-23, 03:00 PM
  #32  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 3,412
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by cegerer
Also, I ordered the Fatty Stripper kit and am converting to tubeless. Next ride I'm going to play around with pressures and see what happens..
Going tubeless will be surprisingly better. Those tubes at a ton of rotating mass, and rolling resistance. It should be an obvious change the first few rides, and might even keep you riding a bit longer.
schnee is offline  
Old 12-10-23, 04:18 PM
  #33  
TC1
Full Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2023
Location: Illinois
Posts: 478
Liked 129 Times in 84 Posts
Originally Posted by schnee
Going tubeless will be surprisingly better. Those tubes at a ton of rotating mass, and rolling resistance. It should be an obvious change the first few rides, and might even keep you riding a bit longer.
How do you figure, exactly? A Surly fat tube weighs 310 grams. Revoloop even makes a 159 gram fat tube. 8 ounces of sealant weighs 227 grams, plus a few for a valve. So the difference is not large even before we account for the difference in tire weight between a tubed-only model and a typically-heavier tire that can be run sans tubes.

Many people assume that going tubeless saves weight, but it rarely does.
TC1 is offline  
Likes For TC1:
Old 12-11-23, 06:16 AM
  #34  
^ * * ^ * * ^
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: FL USA
Posts: 165

Bikes: 1977 Tom Kellogg Nr. 27 - 1984 Bob Jackson - 1987 Alpineer - 1999 Bianchi - 2002 LeMond Buenos Aries- 2007 Specialized Tarmac Pro - 2017 Mongoose Argus Comp FatBike - 2024 Gravity 29er 1-Speed Monstercross

Liked 295 Times in 94 Posts
^^^ When I do my conversion, I'm going to weigh the entire wheel/tire assembly before and after. It likely has thick, heavy tubes in it so it will be interesting to see the difference in my specific case.
cegerer is offline  
Old 12-11-23, 10:14 AM
  #35  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 3,412
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Well, I lost about a pound in my case. It was swapping out the super-heavy cheap OEM tubes, not some expensive lightweight.

I think the main part is the rolling resistance - tubes inside tires create a lot of friction, and on a fatbike, that's more pronounced. And, rolling resistance differences can be huge - just go to sites that measure rolling resistance, and even on a gravel tire it makes ~5w of difference. Fatbikes, with the much lower pressure, and huge surface area, cause more than that.

It basically felt similar a tire swap to a more efficient tread and softer rubber that I did on a mountain bike a little while before. It's something you notice immediately on a straight-away or climb you've done 100 times on the old setup, but after a short time becomes the new norm. Switching back to the slower tire setup will be obvious for a while - until you adapt.
schnee is offline  
Likes For schnee:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.