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Tube repair patch.

Old 07-08-19, 12:19 PM
  #1  
a77impala
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Tube repair patch.

I ran out of tube repair patches so went to local W Mart, all they had were Scabs! Didnít want but Sunday local bike shop closed!
Had a flat today, used a Scab to fix and on my way, less than a mile later, tire is flat again! Removed tube, checked the new Scab and thereís the leak! Put in my spare tube and got home fine. Going to bike shop for old fashioned repair kit and Scabs go in the trash! Sometimes the old way is the best!
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Old 07-08-19, 02:37 PM
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Did you roughen up the tube surface to remove the mould release compound prior to putting on the Scab? I never use pre-glued patches (e.g. Scabs) and I agree that vulcanizing patches and rubber cement are the only way to permanently repair a tube, but no matter what type of patch you use, it won't work unless the mould release compound is scuffed off with sandpaper first.
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Old 07-08-19, 04:05 PM
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I've had bad luck with Scabs, and on the other hand, I've had good luck with Park Super Patches.

I carry the Park patches in my tool pouch, just in case I get more flats during a ride than one spare tube can cover.
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Old 07-22-19, 10:44 AM
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Scabs let me down again! Had a flat so put tube in I had repaired at home with Scab patch. Pumped up with my Road Pro and took off, flat within a quarter mile. Took tire apart, patched tube that was in tire reassembled and rode off, flat within quarter mile. Took tire off, patch leaked, peeled off patch, put on new one, took off, flat within half mile!
Called wife to pick me up, had enough for one day!
Will never use Scabs again!!!
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Old 07-22-19, 10:54 AM
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Life's too short not to use Rema patches. There are other good ones. (I suspect some of the good non-Remas are made by Rema and re-branded.) Vulcanizing technology is very old and far from a trade secret so anyone can make a patchkit as good as Rema. But until you try them, you do not know.

As for non-glue patches - I wouldn't know. Never used them. Putting on a get-home-only patch seems to me a waste of time.

Ben
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Old 07-22-19, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by a77impala View Post
Scabs let me down again! Had a flat so put tube in I had repaired at home with Scab patch. Pumped up with my Road Pro and took off, flat within a quarter mile. Took tire apart, patched tube that was in tire reassembled and rode off, flat within quarter mile. Took tire off, patch leaked, peeled off patch, put on new one, took off, flat within half mile!
Without knowing anything else, I suspect you're not sanding off the mold release compound on the surface of the tube. That stuff is formulated so nothing will stick to the tube's surface during manufacture. If you try to patch the tube later with it still on the surface, guess what? Nothing will still stick to the surface!
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Old 07-22-19, 02:46 PM
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My experience has been good with scabs.
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Old 07-22-19, 02:59 PM
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The kit does not include sandpaper but a metal rasp type tool to roughen the tube. I don’t see how this tool would be capable of removing any or all of the release agent! The first time I used the kit I used a piece of sandpaper like roughener the next time I used the tool provided with the kit! Neither worked!
In any case I’ll go back to tried and true style kit!
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Old 07-22-19, 03:21 PM
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I carry scabs as a last resort then I pull it off and use the old fashion glue. I ride with two spare tubes.
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Old 07-22-19, 03:55 PM
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Try hardware stores for old-school tube repair kits
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Old 07-22-19, 04:15 PM
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OP, did you apply consistent pressure on the patch for 30 seconds after applying it? This is very important!

I consider glueless patches to be a temporary fix to get me out of a jam out on the road. For a permanent repair go with REMA patches in the Gumby green box.
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Old 07-22-19, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Clipped_in View Post
OP, did you apply consistent pressure on the patch for 30 seconds after applying it? This is very important!

I consider glueless patches to be a temporary fix to get me out of a jam out on the road. For a permanent repair go with REMA patches in the Gumby green box.
But why even bother with "glueless" patches? A vulcanizing patch (e.g. Rema) will take just a couple of minutes longer than a glueless patch to install (i.e. the time to smear on the cement and wait for it to dry). You're already investing several minutes in demounting the tire, pulling the tube, reinstalling, checking for pinches, and pumping it back up again. Why not add a minute to have a permanent repair rather than an unreliable one that will require redoing when you get home. There's simply no up side to using "glueless".
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Old 07-22-19, 04:55 PM
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What works, or makes sense, to one person does not correlate to another. Do it the way that works for you and let another do it the way that works for them. Why even "bother" patching a tube on the side of the road. Just throw a new tube in, pump it up and be on your way. Does it "make sense" to have to search for the leak, there just may be more than one. There is simply no "upside" to patching a tube on the road when you can save a few minutes with a new tube and do the patch at home. ????
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Old 07-23-19, 01:52 AM
  #14  
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I've had no problems with Lezyne self-sticking patches. The kit is excellent for a minimalist seat bag -- it's a flat envelope, about half the size of a credit card, with several self-stick patches, a metal roughener, and instructions on a sheet of plastic that doubles as a tire boot. Used 'em several times on my hybrids and road bikes, no problems that weren't due to operator error.

As other folks noted, it's essential to rough up the tube wherever the patch will make contact. The mold release agent needs to be scrubbed off. Takes a little more effort with the metal scrapers rather than sandpaper.

I still use regular patches and glue at home, but I don't carry 'em with me on rides. Just the self-sticking patches, spare tube(s), etc. Usually I'll try to patch first before swapping tubes, because I try to patch without completely removing the tube. Makes it a little quicker, unless it's a tricky flat.
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Old 07-23-19, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by delbiker1 View Post
What works, or makes sense, to one person does not correlate to another. Do it the way that works for you and let another do it the way that works for them. Why even "bother" patching a tube on the side of the road. Just throw a new tube in, pump it up and be on your way. Does it "make sense" to have to search for the leak, there just may be more than one. There is simply no "upside" to patching a tube on the road when you can save a few minutes with a new tube and do the patch at home. ????
For myself and most others I ride with, the patch kit is there for occasions where you get multiple flats on one ride and don't have any spare tubes left.When you put in long distances this is a not uncommon occurrence. So yes, there is a significant upside.

Also, as noted by @canklecat, if the flat location is obvious it's often quicker to just pull a small section of tube out and patch it instead of going through the rigamarole of pulling the entire tube out and replacing.

Last edited by davester; 07-23-19 at 09:13 AM.
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Old 07-23-19, 09:48 AM
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I also always have a spare tube and a patch kit with me. I also have glueless patches with me. My previous post is just to state that not all people think the same way, and how one person does something, does not make it the right way, or the only way that makes sense. If someone wants to make a statement on how they do something, like take care of a flat tire, or their opinion on the best way to proceed with a problem, fine and please, make your idea and opinion known. But try to do so in a way that does not make the statement that your way is the right way and any other way is senseless. I have used, and will continue to use glueless patches when I determine it is the best way for me to proceed. So yes, it makes sense and there is a significant upside, for me, to use glueless. Right back to you do it the way that works for you, and I will do it the way that works for me. Thanks for your response, enjoy the ride and be safe.
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Old 07-23-19, 10:50 AM
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I buy Rema patches and glue in bulk from Amazon. They have the small diameter patches, which work for 99% of punctures. I have 80 grit wet-or-dry paper for sanding, carry an old regular patch box for that stuff, and always have 2 tubes and a spare tire. Quickest patch job is to put on a new tube and tire and not even look for the damage on the road. Apologies to the OP, but I haven't had a patch failure in 25 years. I'm still on my first box of 100 Remas. I have a six patch limit on my tubes. I used to do bulk patch sessions at home, but now I only do onesies.

I'm frankly astonished at how few flats I've had in the past ~5 years. Roads are no better, but tires sure are. I think it's in the compound. Still, I take the 2 tubes and the patch kit. I have a friend who once had 8 flats on one pass climb, all from different causes. He's a 4 tube rider. My record is 4, but that was before I started carrying the tire. 2 of those were from the same piece of wire, and that was maybe 15 years ago on tires of back then. It used to be that we never went on a group ride where no one flatted. Now I can't remember the last group flat. Mechanicals are now more common.
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Old 07-23-19, 02:39 PM
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I have not had many flats for the past number of years. Last year, somewhere around 4000 miles, and only 1 flat. That was from glass that was shattered on the road and with the sun at my back, I did not see it. 2017, 6000 miles and 3 flats. At this point this year, around 3000 miles and zero flats. I have replaced the tires on all four bikes at some point in the past 4 months. The bike I have been riding the most has Panaracer Paselas that are just over 1500 miles and still looking good. My opinion is that tires have definitely gotten better.
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Old 07-25-19, 06:32 AM
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I use the vulcanizing patch system. In my cycling class in college they taught us how to properly repair a tube in the seventies and these type patches were fairly new out. The only problem with the system is that you have to check your tube of glue regularly to make sure it is not dried up. I mentioned this to my LBS when I was buying new tubes of glue . The mechanic told me that when I finished with the repair to carefully fill the cap with glue before putting it back on the tube of cement, thus creating a "seal" . I haven't had a flat since I replaced all the glue in my seat packs so I have no idea if it works but I will try next time I am in that situation(flat tire). I also keep a spare tube with me. Joe joesvintageroadbikes.wordpress
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Old 07-28-19, 10:31 AM
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My Specialized Armadillos have meant that my spare tube in my seat bag is probably deteriorated. I should check it.
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Old 07-29-19, 04:52 PM
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I've never had much luck repairing a tube..How many others like me just install a new one and throw the old one out??
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Old 07-30-19, 06:29 AM
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I use Park glueless patches. They work great with no mess. I have at least 3 years on one of my tubes that has the Park patch on. You just have to know how to use them properly.
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Old 07-30-19, 08:00 AM
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I get at most 2-3 flats per year, and often none. Sometimes I carry a tube, but I'm willing to take my chances with 'just' a patch kit. At worst, patching takes a few minutes more than slapping a tube in. The extra time isn't going to make me lose a race.

After Park and Scabs failed for me, I no longer consider 'instant' patches sufficient even for emergencies. The small vulcanizing kits have never let me down, and give me a convenient place to carry a presta adapter and spare quick-link.
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Old 08-01-19, 07:47 AM
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Flats

Originally Posted by BlazingPedals View Post
I get at most 2-3 flats per year, and often none. Sometimes I carry a tube, but I'm willing to take my chances with 'just' a patch kit. At worst, patching takes a few minutes more than slapping a tube in. The extra time isn't going to make me lose a race.

After Park and Scabs failed for me, I no longer consider 'instant' patches sufficient even for emergencies. The small vulcanizing kits have never let me down, and give me a convenient place to carry a presta adapter and spare quick-link.
I had plans for which type of bike to use for different type of areas around here. The bombtrack b1 has tubless and the fatty is tube, neither are close to human habitation no cell phone, no people, just a nice long ride. I have to put a plan together on how to fix both types of fixes. I'll take any suggestions.
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Old 08-02-19, 11:34 PM
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I don't worry about it. Here in the Philippines the three most common roadside businesses are an "eatery", "Sari-Sari store", and "Vulcanizing". You can't go a half mile on a road that gets any reasonable amount of traffic without passing some guy with a sheet of raw rubber and a hot press. You can't even find a cold patch kit in the local stores. They don't sell what nobody is buying.
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