Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

best light weight step through

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

best light weight step through

Old 03-11-22, 08:06 PM
  #1  
amyvegan
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
best light weight step through

best light weight step through with disc brakes for 5' tall 60 year old under $1000?
i live where there are some steep hills.
thanks so much!
amy
amyvegan is offline  
Old 03-11-22, 08:46 PM
  #2  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,221

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 195 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4386 Post(s)
Liked 2,419 Times in 1,569 Posts
Check out Biria. They're among the few making true easy boarding, low entry step-through frames. Listed weight varies from around 33 lbs on up, with the e-bikes weighing closer to 40 lbs or more.

Most other bikes advertised as "step-through" are actually mixte and compact frames with sloping top tubes. I've also seen a few folding bikes with step-through frames, notably by Tern a few years ago.

Keep in mind that a step-through or any upright bike will be less efficient for climbing. Sitting upright is comfortable for reasonably short distance/duration rides, but makes less efficient use of the adductor muscles. An ideal upright/step-through bike would have motor pedal assist for climbs.

I'm not sure disc brakes would offer any real advantage for the relatively leisurely pace of upright bikes used on pavement and groomed fine gravel/chat trails common to most cycling infrastructure, multi-use paths, etc. Good quality, properly adjusted rim brakes work very well.

FWIW, I went through this back around 2015 when I first got back into cycling after a long hiatus and recovery from a 2001 accident that fractured my neck and back. I needed a cane to walk any distance until 2014. When I resumed cycling I started with a 30+ lb Globe Carmel upright comfort hybrid, and still occasionally used it for errands until around 2019, but haven't ridden it since. Over time with plenty of physical therapy I was able to switch to a more efficient hybrid and, by 2018, mostly drop bar road bikes. But it's a constant struggle and if I take much time off from cycling it takes awhile to regain the strength and flexibility to comfortably ride a drop bar road bike. I expect I'll eventually switch to a hybrid e-assist bike.
canklecat is offline  
Likes For canklecat:
Old 03-11-22, 09:56 PM
  #3  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 29,181

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 940 Times in 621 Posts
Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Check out Biria. They're among the few making true easy boarding, low entry step-through frames. Listed weight varies from around 33 lbs on up, with the e-bikes weighing closer to 40 lbs or more.

Most other bikes advertised as "step-through" are actually mixte and compact frames with sloping top tubes. I've also seen a few folding bikes with step-through frames, notably by Tern a few years ago.

Keep in mind that a step-through or any upright bike will be less efficient for climbing. Sitting upright is comfortable for reasonably short distance/duration rides, but makes less efficient use of the adductor muscles. An ideal upright/step-through bike would have motor pedal assist for climbs.

I'm not sure disc brakes would offer any real advantage for the relatively leisurely pace of upright bikes used on pavement and groomed fine gravel/chat trails common to most cycling infrastructure, multi-use paths, etc. Good quality, properly adjusted rim brakes work very well.
My Biria made 3 speed Calvin is my favorite bike for daily riding on cold days when heavy winter shoes and pants make mounting a traditional "man's" frame more difficult for my 75 year old legs. The easy to make a quick safe dismount feature is also much appreciated when riding in slippery conditions and the coaster brake is 100% reliable and effective no matter how much snow and slop is on the street or stuck to the rim. It is not a lightweight, but unless carrying the bike up stairs or mounting on a roof rack that really doesn't matter all that much.



I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Likes For I-Like-To-Bike:
Old 03-12-22, 09:37 AM
  #4  
amyvegan
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thanks so much re: biria. 33 pounds sounds so heavy. i currently ride a 1999 terry classic that weighs about 25 pounds (maybe less) but i haul pounds of food in bike bucket panniers and i def. need an easy board type bike now. sometimes i nearly drop my bike trying to dismount with bucket paniers full of apples or potatoes, etc. (i haul food for a charity). i should probably get a bike trailer....thank you for any more lightweight sugggestions. ...it's also hilly where i live.
amyvegan is offline  
Old 03-12-22, 11:38 AM
  #5  
skidder
Bipsycorider
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,430

Bikes: Why yes, I do have a few! Thank you for asking!

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 755 Post(s)
Liked 567 Times in 394 Posts
Try Electra bicycles, they have a few 'Townie' models with step-thru frames and deuralliers that'll help on hills and with heavy loads. Soem have disc brakes, others more traditional rim brakes, and maybe a single-speed model (or two). The electric models are over $1000, but the pedal-drive-only are below that (about $750).

Also look on your local Craigslist for a used one (step-thru frames are not popular in my area so they get discounted). If you're handy with tools and don't mind a little wrenching there are plenty of old Schwinn bicycles with step-through frames you can get cheap on Craigslist, too.
skidder is offline  
Old 03-12-22, 12:08 PM
  #6  
amyvegan
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
lightweight is key for me

thanks! lightweight is key for me. appreciate your suggestions so much.
amyvegan is offline  
Old 03-12-22, 05:47 PM
  #7  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,221

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 195 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4386 Post(s)
Liked 2,419 Times in 1,569 Posts
Light weight wouldn't be my priority for a bike used to haul groceries. A hybrid type bike with longer wheelbase will be better balanced for hauling groceries, etc., regardless of weight. One reason I've kept my Globe Carmel was because of the long wheelbase and low center of gravity, making it more stable when loaded. It feels lighter than it really is when loaded with up to 50 lbs of stuff.

Occasionally I'll use my lighter weight, sportier Univega hybrid for hauling groceries, cat supplies, etc., but it's always more demanding of attention, especially on gravel.

I've never tried to put a rack to haul even light loads on my road bikes. I know the balance would be awful. Occasionally I'll wear a backpack but that's about all.

If I planned to use one bike for everything, including errands, I'd get a drop bar touring bike. The longer wheelbase would help, especially the longer chainstays for the rear wheel to allow more heel clearance with panniers. Getting weight lower in panniers, rather than stacking stuff atop a rack, helps with balance, especially on lighter weight bikes.
canklecat is offline  
Old 03-12-22, 08:06 PM
  #8  
xroadcharlie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Windsor Ontario, Canada
Posts: 440

Bikes: 2018 Giant Sedona

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 135 Post(s)
Liked 88 Times in 76 Posts
We would all like a lightweight bike for cheap. Good luck with that. Your lucky to get disc brakes. The Specialized Roll comes in at about 30 lbs, That's about as good as it gets for this type bike.

I rode a friends Specialized Roll step through. Loved that bike, Very comfortable and much more stable then my Giant Sedona, Which I'm happy with too. I was surprised how easy this bike is to pedal with the wide tires. My next bike, If I can get one will be the Specialized Roll 3.0. The Roll 2.0 is what my friend has and is fine for many folks, But the Roll 3.0 has lower gearing, So climbing hills and carrying loads are easier. Both bikes have Fender mounts, Front and rear Rack mounts, and Disc brakes.

Last edited by xroadcharlie; 03-13-22 at 10:18 AM.
xroadcharlie is offline  
Old 03-13-22, 09:27 AM
  #9  
Fredo76
The Wheezing Geezer
 
Fredo76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Location: Española, NM
Posts: 274

Bikes: 1976 Fredo Speciale, Jamis Citizen 1, Ellis-Briggs FAVORI, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Liked 209 Times in 107 Posts
best light weight step through

It seems you want what I want, and I'm not sure they're made. I saw a thread with a vintage Falcon Special recently, which looked exactly right, but too small for me. Otherwise, it looked like a road-racing bike, same proportions, just with a step-through frame. My Jamis step-through is 39 lbs - not exactly light weight. My brother's Clem Smith Jr. step-through is only 32 lbs, but it's a foot longer than a normal bike. I think a drop-bar, lightweight step-through is a business opportunity.
Fredo76 is offline  
Old 03-13-22, 09:46 AM
  #10  
Speedway2
Senior Member
 
Speedway2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Thornhill, Canada
Posts: 656

Bikes: Specialized Langster, Giant OCR, Marin Muirwoods, Globe Roll2, VROD:)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 196 Post(s)
Liked 317 Times in 202 Posts
Have you considered a folding bike?
Speedway2 is offline  
Old 03-14-22, 12:57 AM
  #11  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,221

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 195 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4386 Post(s)
Liked 2,419 Times in 1,569 Posts
One reason step-through, mixte and comfort hybrid bikes tend to weigh at least 30 lbs is because the true low entry step-through design puts a lot of stress on the frame. So the frame needs to be beefy to support it.

In 2015 I bought an early-mid 2000s Globe Carmel I'd assumed would be lightweight because it had an aluminum frame. But it weighed at least 30 lbs in stock configuration, no rear rack, etc. I was curious about the history of Globe (later subsumed by parent corporation Specialized). The Carmel and one or two other Globe models appeared to be influenced by Yuba cargo bikes. And Globe had been planning to launch an early serious of ebikes. They were a little too far ahead of the game and the Globe commuter and cargo ebikes never happened. The weight of motors and batteries for that era of ebikes would be more practical with beefier, stiffer frames.

One reason I've kept that Globe Carmel, even though I haven't ridden it for a couple of years, is in case I decide to fit it with a motor. But so far I haven't seen a cost effective kit, and the combination of the pandemic on the economy and shipping crisis made it infeasible to seriously consider a retrofit now. Maybe in a few years.
canklecat is offline  
Old 03-14-22, 06:00 AM
  #12  
BTinNYC
Enjoying the ride
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Location: Whitestone and Rensselaerville, New York
Posts: 336

Bikes: 1980 Motobecane Nomade, 1989 Centurion Prestige, 2022 Canyon Endurace SL8

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 98 Post(s)
Liked 273 Times in 134 Posts
Amy,
I've been watching these answers because I knew your ask was a tough one. Even putting budget aside, no quick easy solutions.

I assembled a 26 lb step through for the better half, starting with an old big box store aluminum hybrid bike. Stripped it of the cheap heavy everything and went with reasonably light replacements. Only disc on the front, it's a mullet. I didn't keep close track but probably put $300 of new parts plus wheelset parts I had on hand, say another $200ish. Spray paint and decals too. Trying to get near your specs is not a trivial project.

Last edited by BTinNYC; 03-14-22 at 07:06 AM.
BTinNYC is offline  
Likes For BTinNYC:
Old 03-14-22, 11:06 AM
  #13  
Iride01
MotuekaCascadeChinook
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 10,611

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4289 Post(s)
Liked 2,838 Times in 1,976 Posts
Step through bikes are going to be heavy just because of the structural design challenges posed by not having that top tube. So in a budget bike 25 - 30 some odd pounds should probably be expected. I don't even think I've seen a high dollar step thru lighter than your current 25 pound bike.

Since you aren't riding those hills to see how quick you can get up them, then probably concentrate more on a bike that has a wide range of gear ratios. Especially low ratios to let you easily pedal up those hills without grunting too much. Weight is less important if you aren't trying for a KOM.

A bike that has one of those kickstands similar to some motor cycles that has a leg coming down on either side might make your bike more stable when loading and unloading. Don't remember what they are called but I have seen them on cargo bikes.

Last edited by Iride01; 03-14-22 at 11:10 AM.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 03-14-22, 12:13 PM
  #14  
jamesdak 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Utah
Posts: 7,572

Bikes: Paletti,Pinarello Monviso,Duell Vienna,Giordana XL Super(2)Lemond Maillot Juane (2) & custom,PDG Paramount,Serotta CSI,Fuji Opus III,Davidson Impulse,Pashley Guv'nor,Evans,Fishlips,Prologue TT,Y-Foil,Softride, Tetra Pro, CAAD8 Optimo,Klein Quantum II

Mentioned: 135 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1921 Post(s)
Liked 2,093 Times in 965 Posts
You know for years I got by with budget bikes for errands like grocery shopping and such. Always compromises. I finally gave in a bought a brand new Azor stepthrough. Now it's highly optioned and twice the price you mentioned but it is one quality piece of kit that will last forever. The racks have a really high carrying weight limit and the front rack is mounted to the frame, not the front wheel. So it never affects handling. I got it with an 8 speed IGH and have yet to run into a hill it can't conquer. I opted for the heavy duty roller brakes and can't complain about them either. For me a dutch style bike is perfect. Maybe look on the used market for one? I'm a guy and used to struggle mounting my other top heavy utility bikes when the racks were loaded and such. Way too easy for stuff to fall out as I leaned it over to through my leg over it to get on. Now it can be loaded with a ton of stuff, I step on, and take off! Should have did this years ago.


Fenders, lights, coat guard, built in wheel lock, two-legged kickstand, etc. This is a true utility bike!
__________________
Steel is real...and comfy.
jamesdak is offline  
Likes For jamesdak:
Old 03-15-22, 04:12 PM
  #15  
Calsun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Posts: 469
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
Liked 103 Times in 82 Posts
A step through bike is going to weigh more than a standard bike so be sure that is what you need. More than 95% of the bikes sold are not the step through type in the USA. People have been using regular caliper brakes for one hundred years and the disc brakes are needed for heavy mountain bikes and tandem bikes but are more of a marketing gimmick for road bikes. Far more brake failures and crashes with people riding bikes with hydraulic brakes where a failure can take out both the front and the rear brakes which cannot happen with cable type brakes.

Most important with hills is to have a granny low gear that is low enough that you can go up anything. A bike takes 20% of the effort of walking as your weight is supported by the bike. Unless you are in too high a gear. People do need to learn to use their gears, not much different than when driving a car in the mountains with a manual transmission where the driver needs to sense that the engine is struggling and shift into a lower gear. If a bike does not have a low enough gear it is a $50 cost to have larger rear cog installed by a bike shop so you do have this "granny" gear.

You save 50% to 80% with a used bike bought from its owner on Craigslist. If it turns out you do not like it you will still be able to get all your money back when you sell it yourself.
Calsun is offline  
Likes For Calsun:
Old 03-15-22, 10:44 PM
  #16  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 4,848

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1570 Post(s)
Liked 1,553 Times in 982 Posts
I have looked for a lightweight step through bike for my wife for a while. An aluminum mixte would be nice. I never found one. Even the step through city bikes were over 30lb.

But I did find a steel one that is around 25lbs. I ended up ordering just the frame and fork and will use the components off her old Univega. I am waiting for the frame to come back in stock so I can’t comment on the quality.

The bike is made by Handsome and the model is the She Devil. They offer it down to 46cm. The 1x8 is 25lbs and it sells for $900. The only issue is figuring out what gearing you need. You do need to know what the highest gearing you use now and then match a chainring and cassette to give you the lowest for hills.

I wish I had more hands on info, but it is the direction I ended up going.

John
70sSanO is offline  
Likes For 70sSanO:
Old 03-16-22, 06:10 AM
  #17  
BTinNYC
Enjoying the ride
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Location: Whitestone and Rensselaerville, New York
Posts: 336

Bikes: 1980 Motobecane Nomade, 1989 Centurion Prestige, 2022 Canyon Endurace SL8

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 98 Post(s)
Liked 273 Times in 134 Posts
Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
The bike is made by Handsome and the model is the She Devil. They offer it down to 46cm. The 1x8 is 25lbs and it sells for $900. The only issue is figuring out what gearing you need. You do need to know what the highest gearing you use now and then match a chainring and cassette to give you the lowest for hills.

I wish I had more hands on info, but it is the direction I ended up going.

John
Very nice.
BTinNYC is offline  
Old 03-16-22, 11:21 AM
  #18  
Fredo76
The Wheezing Geezer
 
Fredo76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Location: Española, NM
Posts: 274

Bikes: 1976 Fredo Speciale, Jamis Citizen 1, Ellis-Briggs FAVORI, Rivendell Clem Smith Jr.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Liked 209 Times in 107 Posts
Another thread had me looking at a Trek FX2 Stagger, a sort-of step-through hybrid that comes in at 25 lbs. The FX3 Stagger is a 1x version.
Fredo76 is offline  
Likes For Fredo76:
Old 03-16-22, 08:37 PM
  #19  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 4,848

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1570 Post(s)
Liked 1,553 Times in 982 Posts
With all my looking, I had never seem the Stagger model. With the right wheels and components that could easily come in under 25lbs.

John

Edit added: I’m still happy with the frame I ordered, especially since it is pretty cool was on sale for $435.

Last edited by 70sSanO; 03-16-22 at 08:41 PM.
70sSanO is offline  
Old 03-17-22, 09:07 AM
  #20  
sdmc530
Heft On Wheels
 
sdmc530's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 3,124

Bikes: Specialized,Cannondale,Argon 18

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 886 Post(s)
Liked 560 Times in 346 Posts
My wife rides the Specialized Roll, not lightweight compared to my road bikes but not bad either. Rolls really nice and she absolutely loves it. I don't think she will ever part with it. Before this bike she wouldn't ride much with me and our son. Her other more costly bikes she just didn't care for, but with this 10 mile picnic rides are regular in the summer now. Been a great investment on so many levels for our family!
sdmc530 is offline  
Likes For sdmc530:
Old 03-17-22, 06:17 PM
  #21  
xroadcharlie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Windsor Ontario, Canada
Posts: 440

Bikes: 2018 Giant Sedona

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 135 Post(s)
Liked 88 Times in 76 Posts
Originally Posted by sdmc530 View Post
My wife rides the Specialized Roll, not lightweight compared to my road bikes but not bad either. Rolls really nice and she absolutely loves it. I don't think she will ever part with it. Before this bike she wouldn't ride much with me and our son. Her other more costly bikes she just didn't care for, but with this 10 mile picnic rides are regular in the summer now. Been a great investment on so many levels for our family!
Couldn't agree more. As I pointed out in post #8, When I swapped bikes with a friend who had the Roll low entry, I was so impressed with the comfort and stability of this bike, I will probably buy one myself. What surprised me is how easy it is to pedal. Even with an upright rider position and wide tires, It seems no harder to motivate then some hybrid bikes. One thing to consider with these bikes is the gearing. If it's in your budget, Moving up 1 model gets you lower gearing for hill climbs, with plenty at the top end. There's other improvements too.

Don't get hung up on weight unless you have to carry it up 3 flights of stairs to your apartment. Even if you cut the weight by 5 lbs, It would only take about 2.5% more power to climb with, and 90% of that is returned on the downside on many hills. Cruising on flat ground there is virtually no difference.

Last edited by xroadcharlie; 03-17-22 at 06:30 PM.
xroadcharlie is offline  
Likes For xroadcharlie:
Old 03-29-22, 04:01 AM
  #22  
blue192
Senior Member
 
blue192's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 489

Bikes: Norco Scene 1, Khs Westwood, Jamis Allegro 3x

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 131 Post(s)
Liked 59 Times in 37 Posts
The KHS Movo 2.0 is a step through bike with hydraulic brakes and retails for under 1,000$ USD.
blue192 is offline  
Old 03-29-22, 09:31 AM
  #23  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 21,011

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1165 Post(s)
Liked 705 Times in 496 Posts
How light weight do you need? I would suggest a classic steel-framed mixte, such as a Peugeot UO-18 or Motobecane equivalent, with aluminum rims and cranks.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 03-29-22, 09:47 AM
  #24  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 4,848

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1570 Post(s)
Liked 1,553 Times in 982 Posts
Weight can be an odd dilemma. Some people can tell the difference and some can’t.

Up to a point, at least for me, the biggest driver are the wheels. I’m not even talking about ultra lightweight, but taking a couple pounds off the wheels seems to make night and day difference.

That said, I’ve been pretty happy with low 20’s for my road bikes, mid 20’s for urban flat bar, and 3/4 20’s for my hardtails.

Obviously less weight is better, and everyone is different, but that has worked for me.

John
70sSanO is offline  
Old 04-01-22, 11:13 PM
  #25  
50PlusCycling
Senior Member
 
50PlusCycling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 628
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 295 Post(s)
Liked 252 Times in 150 Posts
I might recommend a folding bike. They are short enough that they are all basically “step through” bikes, they are compact, light (usually), and with small wheels and modern drivetrains they can climb, though they may be slow going down hill if you don’t have a big ring on the front. You can get something like a Tern D8 with disc brakes, which has an 8 speed driveline and weighs 30 pounds. It’s well under $1000, and is easily upgradeable. Upgrading to 10 or 11 speeds and a lighter crankset is a bolt-on affair, you can easily shave a few pounds off the bike.

I used a folding bike for much of my riding, I have a Birdy, which I have had a lot of fun modifying. Its fun to ride, reasonably fast, is very light, and I can put in the trunk of my car, which is easier than putting in on a roof rack or hitch rock
50PlusCycling is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.