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Need Help Choosing A New Bicycle

Old 01-30-24, 03:55 PM
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Need Help Choosing A New Bicycle

Hello All,

I'll be turning 60 in March this year, and want to treat myself to a new bicycle. I'm coming from a 2014 Giant Anyroad, which I believe is classified as a cyclocross. It has an aluminum frame, carbon fiber fork, and weighs about 24 pounds. For my next bicycle, I was hoping for a flat-bar hyrbid-bike with a more comfortable geometry, so I'm not leaning forward so much. I also wouldn't mind something slightly lighter too. Most of my riding is either on paved trails at a public park, zipping around the block in my subdivision, and (occasional) rail-to-trails outings with my friends.

Here is what I was thinking:

1. Cannondale Quick
2. Specialized Sirrus
3. Trex Fx

Any advise would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 01-30-24, 04:54 PM
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All three companies are well respected and all of the models you note have many variants over a very wide price range. I'd look at the specs for the ones in your budget as there is quite a range of drivetrain and other components offered. If you have a local bike shop you like and use for maintenance, that might be a significant factor in your choice.

I would also note that you shouldn't assume a more upright position is going to be more comfortable.
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Old 01-30-24, 05:01 PM
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I think you will find that your Anyroad gives you just as relaxed a position as your other picks with a flat bar. Assuming your Anyroad and other bikes are sized by the same methods for your current height, inseam and anything else you wish to go by.

I'd just not like giving up the extra hand positions given by a drop bar. They come in handy for me on long rides even when I'm not trying to be as fast as I can be. Possibly you might just need to shorten the stem on your Anyroad if you are feeling stretched out too much. Or if the bars have a lot of reach built into them, then there are also short reach drop bars that might help with that too.

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Old 01-31-24, 08:29 AM
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4. Kona Dew
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Old 01-31-24, 03:15 PM
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Thanks for the advice thus far. I really appreciate it.

Interesting perspectives on the handle bars. I wish I could just drop the seat on my Anyroad. At 5'7" and 30.5" inseam, I'm right in-between size S and M, and when I purchased it, my local bike shop recommended the S, which I think might have been a mistake, as I seem to have the seat substantially higher than the handle bars in order to keep my legs in the right position.

Totally agree about the wide price range on these hybrid fitness bikes. Here are the models I was thinking:

1. Quick 1. MSRP $1,400. Weight 23.4 pds.
2. Sirrus 4.0. Sale $1,279. No weight listed.
3. Trek Fx 4. MSRP $1,799. Weight 23.7 pds.

Also, I can't believe how much cheaper the Canyon Roadlite 4 is at $699 sale and weight of 21.96 pds. Seems like a good deal, but reviews say riding position is slouch-forward too.

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Old 01-31-24, 03:47 PM
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I can speak to the FX and the Quick 1. I found the FX to be a bit more upright than the Quick 1. That being said, the Quick 1 is a great bike and can hold up to it's name.

As for size, I'm 5'6" with a 29.5" inseam and ride a Medium Quick 1 without a problem. The Trek FXs I tested out before the Quick 1 were also mediums.
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Old 01-31-24, 10:22 PM
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While I would never try to talk anyone from getting a new bike, I might try to talk you out of flat bars. While I know many do like them for road riding. It makes no sense to me as you just have the one hand position. I'm also one of those that more upright is more uncomfortable for me.

But that said, if you think the bars are too low on your Giant Anyroad, it might be possible to get a different stem that angles upward more and therefore raises the bars. I think some stems can be flipped over. So, if it angles down, and you flip it, it will angle up raising the bars. This might be something to consider. But not to avoid getting a new bike, but rather to see if you can get comfortable on the bike you have and therefore know exactly what to get in your new bike.

Also, the bars may be rotated too far forward and down. Therefore rotating the bars up and back will raise the contact point and may be an improvement. You could even consider moving the shifters up the bars to move the contact point up and back towards you a bit. Several little things may add up to a big difference.

Also, don't forget moving the saddle forward or backward to change things. Though ideally the saddle should be positioned for best fit relative to the BB (pedals), there is no exact perfect position, so you can fudge it a little forward and back to adjust reach to the bars.
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Old 02-01-24, 01:54 AM
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I also went from flat bars to drops when I was about 40ish and canít see myself ever going back (Iím about 5 years younger) Worth considering something like pilates for overall flexibility and core strength but I just do a lot of miles on the bike.

but if the geometry is out, that might not help as much as some of the suggestions above. I also go down a size if Iím on the cusp but otherwise Iíd have very large frames which I donít like just for the aesthetics. Perhaps worth considering a medium this time.
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Old 02-01-24, 09:28 AM
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Some brands are just a tad higher in pricing. But usually when you see significant differences, it's because of the components on the bike being different. The groupset, wheels and etc. And even when they say a bike has a certain groupset on it, it might only a partial group with other brands of brake, crankset or what ever else they could find to cut their costs.
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Old 02-01-24, 09:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Iride01
Some brands are just a tad higher in pricing. But usually when you see significant differences, it's because of the components on the bike being different. The groupset, wheels and etc. And even when they say a bike has a certain groupset on it, it might only a partial group with other brands of brake, crankset or what ever else they could find to cut their costs.
Great point - Cannondale uses a FSA crank on the Quick 1
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Old 02-01-24, 04:41 PM
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$.02- throw the desire for less weight out the window. Seriously does not matter when you mention comfort and fit issues. If your existing bike posture has the bars too low get a new stem that puts them where you want them to be. Do this before buying a new bike. It will be a cheap improvement and get you into the habit of getting the bike right for you.

Bar shape, hand position and posture have a lot to do with comfort so be willing to experiment with different bars. Nothing wrong with accumulating a few bars or saddles. You probably have more than one pair of shoes so more than one saddle, tire or bar is
ok. Personally straight mtn bike bars are an abomination for non-racers. Try old fashioned swept back touring or 3 spd bars, Jones bars, etc.

I went from drop bars to Jones bars fifteen years ago and have 3 Jones bars on three bikes. Kona Dew recomendation sounds good.
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Old 02-01-24, 05:00 PM
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Yeah, I’ve been looking at the spec sheets on each bike, and they appear to be quite different. I wish I had more knowledge about which one has the best components, but I’ll figure it out eventually. Once the weather gets better here in Michigan, I’m hoping to take each one for a test ride.

Also, I really like the idea of flipping or replacing the handle-bar-stem on my Anyroad. If my local bike shop can do that, I might be inclined to just keep it for a few more years. I think I paid $1,200 ten years ago, and it only has 2,700 miles on it, with hardly any scratches. The low usage is due to an enjoyment of several different sports, such as tennis, golf, and running.

I’m also starting to understand everyone’s points about drop bars versus flat bars, so thanks for that. It must of been part of my research last time, and I just don’t remember. You guys have been very helpful.
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Old 02-01-24, 07:00 PM
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re. components. Again not that big a priority compared to getting the bars where you want them. I transitioned from drop bars on my touring/commuter bike by the time I was 50 and carrying groceries. In the following decade I bought a long wheelbase aluminum city bike, Felt Cafe, that really surprised me how well it rode. A few year ago got a Rivindell Clem Smith that is off the charts comfy and fun for my rural locale.
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Old 02-01-24, 09:56 PM
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Originally Posted by End Over
Hello All,

I'll be turning 60 in March this year, and want to treat myself to a new bicycle. Most of my riding is either on paved trails at a public park, zipping around the block in my subdivision, and (occasional) rail-to-trails outings with my friends.

Here is what I was thinking:

1. Cannondale Quick
2. Specialized Sirrus
3. Trex Fx

Any advise would be greatly appreciated.
When I was younger and rode for several hours/miles (for the day), I found drops to be very comfortable with multiple hand positions.
Now in my 6th decade my rides are shorter and find that flat-bars work for me. I even swapped the drops on my roadbike to flats.
Before you decide which bike ensure you spend some time with them in the real world if possible and buy the one the fits you best. That said I would pick the Cannondale Quick 1.
After deciding which new bike, get your current bike fitted properly and enjoy a few more miles with it.
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Old 02-03-24, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Speedway2
When I was younger and rode for several hours/miles (for the day), I found drops to be very comfortable with multiple hand positions.
Now in my 6th decade my rides are shorter and find that flat-bars work for me. I even swapped the drops on my roadbike to flats.
Before you decide which bike ensure you spend some time with them in the real world if possible and buy the one the fits you best. That said I would pick the Cannondale Quick 1.
After deciding which new bike, get your current bike fitted properly and enjoy a few more miles with it.
My transition to upright bars was necessary for heavy front loads in city traffic. Was just not safe for low speed handling around cars or small drops off curbs. Then there was the beer gut. The basic swept back bars used for 100 yrs is a much better position than straight motorcycle bars good for going down drops.
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Old 02-04-24, 02:36 PM
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My suggestion is to consider butterfly, or trekking handlebars. They give you many options for hand positions. You can rotate them away from you, so can have a kind of horizontal orientation (front to back) for more reach if you want, or towards you so you can have a higher position and a lower position. I did this to my Jamis Renegade Expert and never regretted it. I put Grab On Grips all the way around and it was very comfortable. I never rode drop bars again. The flat bars can be changed to butterfly using the same shifters and brake levers, I think.
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Old 02-05-24, 09:01 AM
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For price, never overlook bikesdirect. They have several flat bar road-type bikes.
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Old 02-09-24, 05:56 PM
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I have drop bars on all of my road bikes, but regular Ritchey mountain bike bars on my mountain bike, with forward-projecting extensions to give me valuable additional hand positions with a neutral forearm rotation.


Those 4-finger motorcycle-style brake levers let me do normal braking, anything short of a panic stop, from the extensions. Very handy!
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Old 02-10-24, 07:48 AM
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Changing a stem and handlebars is an easy job that you should be able to do at home. I would definitely change my existing bike before getting a new one. Everyone needs at least 2 bikes. You might change the stem to a more upright stem and even go with something like the Jones riser bars. I turned my MTB into a giant beach cruiser with Soma Dream bars. I prefer a nice upright and comfortable ride with beach cruiser geometry for short 2 hour or less rides on park trails. I prefer drop bars for very long rides on more open roads but even then, for long rides I want a more upright ride like my Surly LHT. If I am just out to get my run on for an hour or so, I would take a much more aggressive and lighter race bike with a high seat and low drop bars.

If you modify your existing bike, you will be able to at least know if you want upright bars for the majority of your riding or if drop bars are preferred. You will have a much better idea of exactly what you want when you do decide to get a new bike.
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Old 02-13-24, 01:45 PM
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Much of the weight of a bike is in the wheels and tires. Bikes that are considered "city" bikes will often have lighter wheels and tires and still provide enough traction on park trails as well as on the pavement. Most of the hybrid bikes are quite a bit heavier than road bikes.

The Specialized Sirus bikes are a good starting point and is well equipped and weighs 23.8 lbs The Specialized bike has their Future Shock 1.5 front fork that provides an elegant solution to reducing road shock at the front wheel and to the handlebars and rider.
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Old 03-13-24, 03:55 PM
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Which one did you actually choose? I want to start using with the https://academized.com/custom-research-paper and start looking for a new bike finally. With their assistance, I'll have much time to dedicate to finding the perfect bike that suits my needs and preferences. It's exciting to embark on this journey, and I'm grateful for the support of Academized in helping me manage my academic responsibilities efficiently.

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Old 03-13-24, 08:20 PM
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My flat bar bike has these "bar inners" from SQ-Labs with the matching grips. This gives you road bike like brake hood position at a normal width, unlike bar ends which I find to be too wide for street riding. These grips allow me to shift and brake without moving my hands, just like on a road bike too. They were kind of pricey but they work and the grips were really good too, better than what I had.
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Old 03-17-24, 10:57 AM
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That Anyroad is high up the cruiser clown scale IMO. I don't blame you for wanting something else.
ALL the Cannondale bikes are awful with stupidly sloped frames for no reason. Forget them.
For derailleurs only 2x makes sense to me. Damn hydro and thru axle is about all that's made now. Don't get tires any smaller than 35mm.
Drop and MTB bars are BOTH awful for casual riding. I LOVE my old style swept riser chrome bars. I can adjust my hands and back better than ANY drop bar.
The FX2 and Sirius are about what most casual riders get.
I think the OP would be better off with an IGH 8 speed with belt drive.
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Old 03-19-24, 06:24 PM
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Hello all, thanks for the follow-up advice. Good stuff.

I decided to delay my decision until this Fall. My local bike shop wonít receive any Quick 1ís or Sirrus 4.0ís in my size until later this year, so I wonít be able to test ride and compare them. Getting new (2025) models at the beginning of winter is kind of counterintuitive here in Michigan, but it is what it is. They said they can easily recalibrate the handlebar stem on my Anyroad, so Iíll be dropping the bike off there very soon. I usually start riding in early April.
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