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Mounting/dismounting with hip arthritis

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Mounting/dismounting with hip arthritis

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Old 05-13-11, 08:09 PM
  #26  
67walkon
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You can do it! In December, 2009, I crashed badly, pretty much shattering my pelvis. They put 10 screws and 2 plates in there--I have an 8" inch scar on my butt on that side.

My range of motion is slightly decreased and I will eventually need a hip replacement.

At first, I did the lay the bike over thing and it worked okay. To dismount, I would kind of scoot off the back of the bike.

I progressed to being able to put my right leg over the bar and then to being able to swing my right leg over the saddle to dismount.

Tonight, for the first time since the wreck, I was able to swing my right leg over the saddle to get on. I think I could have done it a while ago, but I just didn't feel like I could.

Like you, I could and can ride without discomfort. Walking kind of sucks because I have some nerve issues in the uninjured side, related to a disk issue, related to the injury and rehab, etc, etc.

Keep experimenting and something will work. We can't quit. Never, never, never give up.
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Old 05-13-11, 09:28 PM
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Wife and I just bought new bikes and we both bought "ladies" bikes. except now they call them unisex bikes or low-entry. I just turned 60 and want to be doing this for at least ten years. I wouldn't want to give up a new bike either, but folks reading this thread and thinking about a new bike should consider this option.

Just planning ahead...
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Old 05-13-11, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by colpatrick View Post
Wife and I just bought new bikes and we both bought "ladies" bikes. except now they call them unisex bikes or low-entry. I just turned 60 and want to be doing this for at least ten years. I wouldn't want to give up a new bike either, but folks reading this thread and thinking about a new bike should consider this option.

Just planning ahead...
I'm almost 72 and I've got 12 years on you - absolutely no problem with a road bike - well, actually 3 of them. I ride what is most comfortable for my riding style (road bike), and, planning ahead, will likely be riding a road bike for many more years.

I think one can plan themselves into thinking, being, acting and riding old.

I'm planning ahead. also . . . .

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Old 05-14-11, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by GetUpnGo View Post
Correct. I feel that after a certain age you have to be really careful about giving things up, because you may never get those activities back again. My approach is to modify activities rather than give them up. I'm sure a trike can be considered modified biking, but I'm nowhere near that point yet.
Modified biking? Don't understand that statement at all. One bad behavior of some cyclist is that they tend to be a bit blind in one eye from time to time.

It matters not what you ride be it two wheel, three wheels or more as long as you ride the cycle of your choice. A trike isn't a step down from a bicycle it's just a different way to ride if you choose to. There is NO disgrace in riding a trike any more than there is riding a bicycle.
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Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 05-14-11, 01:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
Modified biking? Don't understand that statement at all. One bad behavior of some cyclist is that they tend to be a bit blind in one eye from time to time.

It matters not what you ride be it two wheel, three wheels or more as long as you ride the cycle of your choice. A trike isn't a step down from a bicycle it's just a different way to ride if you choose to. There is NO disgrace in riding a trike any more than there is riding a bicycle.
My approach to aging is that I continue doing an activity as long I'm able without too much pain. As I lose function or fitness, I modify the activity. For example, I got a lighter kayak that I can put on my car by myself. Or I may do the activity differently, perhaps at a less intense level. I switched my skiing from black diamonds to blue. When I've run out of options for modifications, I switch to another activity---I probably shouldn't be backpacking anymore, but I've fallen in love with the acoustic guitar. That way my life continues to expand in some ways even while shrinking in others.

I don't really know anything about tricycles. I biked 750 miles last year. My goal this year---on a better bike, that fits me better and has lower gears---is 1000 miles. That's a modification from my previous personal best of 2000 miles. I'm praying my arthritis doesn't block this plan. Somehow I can't see myself riding 1000 miles on a tricycle. If someday I'm forced to give up a two-wheeled bike and take up a tricyle, I would consider that a modification. See what I'm saying?

Anyway, it's simple: I love my bike and the suggestions given here will most likely help me keep riding it another year. Some cyclists may be blind, but others may see things that aren't really there, like unintended criticism of things that are near and dear to them.
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Old 05-14-11, 03:40 PM
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Try standing your bike on the rear wheel. Pull the saddle through your legs. This will put you over the top tube. Good luck. Hope you get better.
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Old 05-14-11, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
I'm almost 72 and I've got 12 years on you - absolutely no problem with a road bike - well, actually 3 of them. I ride what is most comfortable for my riding style (road bike), and, planning ahead, will likely be riding a road bike for many more years.

I think one can plan themselves into thinking, being, acting and riding old.

I'm planning ahead. also . . . .
It would be quite easy to read a large amount of arrogance into this statement, perhaps brought about by ignorance as to why many people have limiting physical factors. I hope this was not your intent.

But, I can assure you, that myself and many others who suffer with Arthritis,and mobility issues; do not suffer from them due to lack of "planning", or insufficient desire to stay active, and pain free. The fact that some are willing to change the types of machine we ride in order to stay ridding; even through significant mobility loss, and often enduring great pain speaks volumes, about our "planning" in and of its self.

I've never met anyone who "planned" on having Degenerative Arthritis... If you can ride your road bike the rest of your life, count yourself as fortunate; it could go away very quickly.
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Old 05-14-11, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by GetUpnGo View Post
In the past year I have developed fairly severe arthritis in one hip. It has gotten pretty hard to get my foot up over the top bar due to limited range of motion. Once I'm on the bike I'm pretty much ok. Getting off is even harder. Changing sides doesn't help.

Anybody else have this problem?

I can't imagine changing my bike as a lot of effort and expense went into getting the perfect bike built last year. There is no version of my frame available with a lower top tube---it's a standard men's frame.

Got any exercises to recommend to increase mobility or range of motion?

I'm assuming that inflammation is a big part of the problem, so I'm looking into ways to reduce that (especially diet).
I agree with many people on this thread... Lay the bike down and step over it. That's the only way I could get on one before I got my Mixte, and other U frame.

As for your hips, stay up to date with what's going on with them with your Doctor/Surgeon, things can change surprisingly quickly with Degenerative Arthritis. My doctor knew my left hip was bad, but about two weeks before my replacement surgery it started getting really bad. I was standing on one leg all the time, and barely able to walk. Turns out in the time (about a month) since my last visit with my doctor the joint had fused and was breaking loose part of the top of my pelvis. (I was 46 at the time) My doctor had to literally chisel the joint apart and do a bone graft, also put the new joint in at a slightly different angle. My doctor said "I didn't think it was that bad"...

Don't jump into the replacement out of fear, but be mindful that the joint(s) may not degenerate on a steady curve either. If it suddenly starts hurting worse, or stiffens up worse, or just feels different than before... see your doctor.
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Old 05-14-11, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by colpatrick View Post
Wife and I just bought new bikes and we both bought "ladies" bikes. except now they call them unisex bikes or low-entry. I just turned 60 and want to be doing this for at least ten years. I wouldn't want to give up a new bike either, but folks reading this thread and thinking about a new bike should consider this option.

Just planning ahead...
Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
I'm almost 72 and I've got 12 years on you - absolutely no problem with a road bike - well, actually 3 of them. I ride what is most comfortable for my riding style (road bike), and, planning ahead, will likely be riding a road bike for many more years.

I think one can plan themselves into thinking, being, acting and riding old.

I'm planning ahead. also . . . .
Originally Posted by Bionicycle View Post
It would be quite easy to read a large amount of arrogance into this statement, perhaps brought about by ignorance as to why many people have limiting physical factors. I hope this was not your intent.

But, I can assure you, that myself and many others who suffer with Arthritis,and mobility issues; do not suffer from them due to lack of "planning", or insufficient desire to stay active, and pain free. The fact that some are willing to change the types of machine we ride in order to stay ridding; even through significant mobility loss, and often enduring great pain speaks volumes, about our "planning" in and of its self.

I've never met anyone who "planned" on having Degenerative Arthritis... If you can ride your road bike the rest of your life, count yourself as fortunate; it could go away very quickly.
You managed to lift my comment quite nicely out of context, applying your situation to a post to which I was responding which in no way paralleled your situation.

So, reread Colpatricks post, where, at age 60, with no stated physical symptoms, he is making plans to ride for 10 years on a bike which he chose just in case he might be debilitated.

My point, in response to HIS (not your) post was that one should live for the moment, not plan for obsolescence 10 years from now. Why not enjoy a great bike NOW? You can buy an appropriate bike when, AND IF, the situation arises.

And, turn down the sensitvity a bit, please.
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Old 05-14-11, 05:16 PM
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Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
You managed to lift my comment quite nicely out of context, applying your situation to a post to which I was responding which in no way paralleled your situation.

So, reread Colpatricks post, where, at age 60, with no stated physical symptoms, he is making plans to ride for 10 years on a bike which he chose just in case he might be debilitated.

My point, in response to HIS (not your) post was that one should live for the moment, not plan for obsolescence 10 years from now. Why not enjoy a great bike NOW? You can buy an appropriate bike when, AND IF, the situation arises.

And, turn down the sensitvity a bit, please.
With apologies then... As stated, I had hoped that I had misread your intent.
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Old 05-14-11, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Bionicycle View Post
With apologies then... As stated, I had hoped that I had misread your intent.
The internet is filled with messages poorly stated (likely mine) and misunderstood meanings.

Just as background, I have two sons in wheelchairs. One is totally paralyzed and can not ride a bike, the other can walk a bit. He can also ride a 3 wheeler, which, of course, is what we bought him, as it fits his needs as of the moment. However, I would have not bought him a 3 wheeler many, many years ago, just for the possibility that he might need one now.
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Old 05-14-11, 07:54 PM
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1. I strongly recommend the "bike tilt" strategy mentioned above and have used it often myself, especially to dismount when I am very tired at ride's end.
2. Ride your regular road bike as long as you can (and still want to). There is time enough to get a different kind of bike if and when that becomes necessary.
3. Nutritional supplements are probably worth a try and might offer some improvement.

Keep us posted... and good luck!
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Old 05-14-11, 08:25 PM
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Originally Posted by GetUpnGo View Post
My approach to aging is that I continue doing an activity as long I'm able without too much pain. As I lose function or fitness, I modify the activity. For example, I got a lighter kayak that I can put on my car by myself. Or I may do the activity differently, perhaps at a less intense level. I switched my skiing from black diamonds to blue. When I've run out of options for modifications, I switch to another activity---I probably shouldn't be backpacking anymore, but I've fallen in love with the acoustic guitar. That way my life continues to expand in some ways even while shrinking in others.

I don't really know anything about tricycles. I biked 750 miles last year. My goal this year---on a better bike, that fits me better and has lower gears---is 1000 miles. That's a modification from my previous personal best of 2000 miles. I'm praying my arthritis doesn't block this plan. Somehow I can't see myself riding 1000 miles on a tricycle. If someday I'm forced to give up a two-wheeled bike and take up a tricyle, I would consider that a modification. See what I'm saying?

Anyway, it's simple: I love my bike and the suggestions given here will most likely help me keep riding it another year. Some cyclists may be blind, but others may see things that aren't really there, like unintended criticism of things that are near and dear to them.
I have difficulty walking for very long or very far but when I'm on my trike or my new cruiser I can go almost forever ! That said, I know that for those of us with arthritis life is a daily struggle that we have to fight.

I rode for decades on a bike like most here then my legs/knees started to give out so I adapted. The arthritis made me unsteady on a bike so I moved to a custom built trike which I still use from time to time yet today. The new bike however ,being a heavy cruiser, is easy to ride unlike my other weight weenie bikes so the cruiser is between my legs everyday rain or shine in my fight to keep my mobility.

If you'll note my post only suggest that you consider a trike when you decide it's time to adapt your riding style once again to save your mobility. However, there is one concern that I hope you don't gloss over......damage to your hips/spine should you fall off your bike.
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Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 05-15-11, 07:28 AM
  #39  
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"However, there is one concern that I hope you don't gloss over......damage to your hips/spine should you fall off your bike."

Well sure, we all get more fragile as we age. But I don't want to lead a life driven by fear of injury or pain. I know people who more or less avoid life in their attempt to avoid pain. EXPANSION is a key word for me. I will be reasonably cautious, but every day I ask myself, "How can I expand my life beyond where I was yesterday?" Fear of breaking my hip kept me off the ski slopes this year. I don't know if that was the right thing to do. I finished the long winter with a rather low level of fitness and more pain than ever. I'm no more likely to fall off my bike than anyone else here. Difficulty getting on and off doesn't really affect my balance. It's possible to get your foot caught on the top tube while dismounting, but you learn pretty quickly to just not do that.

I sense that time is growing short. About five years ago I realized that my window for doing vigorous outdoor activities was closing down, so I rushed to fill up those years with as much activity as I could. Now I can accept modifying how I go about things.
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Old 05-15-11, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by GetUpnGo View Post
"However, there is one concern that I hope you don't gloss over......damage to your hips/spine should you fall off your bike."

Well sure, we all get more fragile as we age. But I don't want to lead a life driven by fear of injury or pain. I know people who more or less avoid life in their attempt to avoid pain. EXPANSION is a key word for me. I will be reasonably cautious, but every day I ask myself, "How can I expand my life beyond where I was yesterday?" Fear of breaking my hip kept me off the ski slopes this year. I don't know if that was the right thing to do. I finished the long winter with a rather low level of fitness and more pain than ever. I'm no more likely to fall off my bike than anyone else here. Difficulty getting on and off doesn't really affect my balance. It's possible to get your foot caught on the top tube while dismounting, but you learn pretty quickly to just not do that.

I sense that time is growing short. About five years ago I realized that my window for doing vigorous outdoor activities was closing down, so I rushed to fill up those years with as much activity as I could. Now I can accept modifying how I go about things.

What I was talking about is what everyone should do...balance their zeal for life with due diligence to limit their risk. THAT doesn't mean crawl in a cave and cower.

Carpe diem!!
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Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 05-15-11, 06:27 PM
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Tip your bike down or lay it down, as others have noted. When you had a custom frame built, you should have had them build you a mixte frame.
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Old 05-16-11, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Terex View Post
Tip your bike down or lay it down, as others have noted. When you had a custom frame built, you should have had them build you a mixte frame.
Alas, when I got this bike one year ago I had a lifelong scorn for anything other than a horizontal top tube and had full range of motion in my hip. I looked into the women's version of the frame recently, but the top tube was as high as the men's. I sure would like a mixte frame right about now.
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Old 05-16-11, 06:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
What I was talking about is what everyone should do...balance their zeal for life with due diligence to limit their risk. THAT doesn't mean crawl in a cave and cower.

Carpe diem!!
You're complete correct about that. There's a good chance that lack of due diligence has contributed in no small measure to various body parts that are no longer fully functional. I realized that too late. Joint damage creeps up on you quietly and then suddenly rears its ugly head one day.
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Old 05-16-11, 07:26 PM
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Originally Posted by GetUpnGo View Post
Alas, when I got this bike one year ago I had a lifelong scorn for anything other than a horizontal top tube and had full range of motion in my hip. I looked into the women's version of the frame recently, but the top tube was as high as the men's. I sure would like a mixte frame right about now.
I wouldn't trade mine for a brand new (insert name here) C.F., or TY, AL diamond frame bike if someone offered. (Unless I could flip it for cash ) Arthritis in my back, in my Left knee, Right knee, Right Hip, and a titanium and Cobalt steel Left hip... Yes, I can still ride, but I love a step through frame now. Step through frames aren't just for women. Anyone who wants to argue otherwise can just kiss my... well you know.
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Old 05-17-11, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Bionicycle View Post
I wouldn't trade mine for a brand new (insert name here) C.F., or TY, AL diamond frame bike if someone offered. (Unless I could flip it for cash ) Arthritis in my back, in my Left knee, Right knee, Right Hip, and a titanium and Cobalt steel Left hip... Yes, I can still ride, but I love a step through frame now. Step through frames aren't just for women. Anyone who wants to argue otherwise can just kiss my... well you know.
yep, the time when men didn't ride "girls" bikes is , thankfully, long gone. Today, folks ride what they like with not a care what others think.
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Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 06-23-14, 01:58 PM
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I ran across this thread looking for the answer to getting on and off my bike with my bad hips. Thanks Bob O'Keefe for that method, it was almost too simple. It helped alot because I always ride the MS bikeathon here and wasn't sure I'd be able to do it this year or maybe need a new bike. I had no problems mounting and dismounting even though it looks a bit goofey doing it. Thanks again to everyone here for all the good info.
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Old 06-24-14, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Brew1 View Post
I recently had my right hip replaced and I should have insisted on it being done sooner....
The two guys I know with fake hips said the same thing.
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Old 06-24-14, 10:29 PM
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Old 06-25-14, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Pars View Post
I've had both of my hips replaced (2008/2009), and had the same problem before replacement. My bike is probably on the large side for me, but I could tilt the bike over one way and just step over the top tube to get on/off of it.
My wife has had two hip replacements (on the same side; the first prosthesis failed after 7 years and had to be replaced). She too still has trouble lifting her leg high enough to clear the top tube without leaning the frame, but at least she's pain-free now!
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Old 07-26-16, 05:41 PM
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mount with bad hips

I too have arthritis in my hips and it is very difficult to get on and off my bike. I found that standing on the curb while my bike is on the road gives me just enough height to swing my leg over. So i always try to find a place where I'm standing a few inches higher than the bike when getting on or off.
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