Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

Do I need a road bike also?

Notices
Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

Do I need a road bike also?

Old 10-02-11, 01:15 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jmiked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 141

Bikes: Specialized Camber Elite 29er

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Do I need a road bike also?

I'm riding a Specialized Camber Elite 29er mountain bike at the moment, which I like very much. I was in the LBS last week looking at road bikes, considering whether or not to put one on my wish list. My question is:

Given that I rarely go over 20mph or ride more than 25 miles on a trip, is there any real advantage to a separate road bike? The 29er seems to do just fine on paved roads. It doesn't have really aggressive tires, so it doesn't make a lot of noise or have a lot of rumble/vibration.

The only significant differences I can think of for a road bike are an 8-10 pound weight advantage and slightly better gearing for road use. Frankly that's not really enough to sway me much. And honestly, I like the comfort of the full-suspension Camber.

Any thoughts would be welcome.

Last edited by jmiked; 10-02-11 at 01:17 PM. Reason: tamned dypos
jmiked is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 01:36 PM
  #2  
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Uncertain
Posts: 8,651
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Need and want are very different things. It depends what you want from your riding. Suspension is a waste of time on-road, it is heavy and unless you lock it out it is wasting energy that should be propelling you forward. You rarely go over 20 mph? I'm not surprised, on a full-suspension MTB.

So, riding a road bike would be a very different experience. Whether it is an experience you want, or would pay money for, only you can tell. I suggest you try a few and see. For me, I'd hate to ride much on the road on a full-suspension 29er. But I'm a bit of an ageing boy racer, and you may not be.
chasm54 is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 01:44 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
VertigoFlyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Balmy Snoqualmie WA
Posts: 172

Bikes: 2011 Trek Madone 5.2, 2010 Trek Fuel EX 8

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Just as your MTB opened up a whole new world for you a road bike will do the same. I own both and love both for very different reasons. I love my MTB for being out on the trail in the wild country. I love my road bike for putting lots of miles under me on country roads.
VertigoFlyer is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 01:54 PM
  #4  
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Posts: 19,913

Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
5 years ago I got my first road bike after 15 years of Offroading on MTB's. Just to see what these road things were about. Now besides the MTB's doing offroad- Change of tyres and metrics and 100 milers were done each year So road riding wasn't new to me- but riding with my head between my knees was. Can tell you now- Road riding is fun- even better if you have the right equipment to do it on. Milage went up- speed went up- and routes I used to worry about doing on the MTB were a doddle on the road bike.

It is not necessarily the speed of a road bike that makes it enjoyable- but the comfort on a 40 miler is far better. And you find you can do a 40 miler on a road bike with ease. Then from 40 miles- you just go upwards.

Only thing I would suggest if you go road- Buy cheap but buy above Cr*p. You don't know what you want in road bikes- what size- what groupset and even what form (Comfort-competition-Race)--But you would after a year or so. That is when you find out the only reason for that that 1st bike- is so that you can get the right bike 2nd time around.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 01:58 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jmiked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 141

Bikes: Specialized Camber Elite 29er

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chasm54
You rarely go over 20 mph? I'm not surprised, on a full-suspension MTB.
Well, it's got less to do with it being on a mountain bike than it does with 1) I'm getting on towards 70 years of age, 2) I'm recovering from fairly serious cancer surgery, and 3) I have a bum knee that two surgeries have failed to fix. I'm a guy that likes to ride around and look at the scenery, not a speed or distance guy.

Also, I practically lived on a Gitane Tour de France 10-speed road bike (sew-up tires) in the mid-seventies, so I'm not a stranger to road bikes. I just haven't ridden one in almost 40 years.
jmiked is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 02:04 PM
  #6  
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Uncertain
Posts: 8,651
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by jmiked

Also, I practically lived on a Gitane Tour de France 10-speed road bike (sew-up tires) in the mid-seventies, so I'm not a stranger to road bikes. I just haven't ridden one in almost 40 years.
Fantastic. I take it you don't still have it? Very desirable.

OK, so you know the score. The question, then, is whether you'd enjoy the ride more on the road bike. I still think the only answer is to do a test ride and see.

And good luck with your recuperation.
chasm54 is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 02:12 PM
  #7  
Life is good
 
RonH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Not far from the Withlacoochee Trail. 🚴🏻
Posts: 18,209

Bikes: 2018 Lynskey Helix Pro

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 522 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by jmiked
...I'm getting on towards 70 years of age...
I'm coming up on 67 and have only road bikes. If you look around you'll see that there are many others here who are 65+ and ride a road bike all the time.
Age doesn't count on the 50+ forum.
__________________
The Lord is merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love. - Psalm 103:8

I am a cyclist. I am not the fastest or the fittest. But I will get to where I'm going with a smile on my face.
RonH is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 02:21 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jmiked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 141

Bikes: Specialized Camber Elite 29er

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chasm54
Fantastic. I take it you don't still have it? Very desirable.
Unfortunately I don't. I sold it a year or so after the second round of knee surgery under the impression that I'd been told not to do things like that. It wasn't until recently (I just started back bike riding in April) that it dawned on me that bike riding is a low-impact activity and should be fine. I can't stand up to pedal because my knee will instantly go out from under me and I'll be on the ground, but as long as I'm sitting down I can get up some impressively steep hills (27 gears help).

Part of the reason I'm struggling with this is that I do a lot of geocaching, and end up pedaling down some pretty rough roads/trails which would destroy a road bike in short order, I think. I need to decide if I'll be riding paved roads enough to justify a road bike, or just go ahead and use the mountain bike for everything.

Last edited by jmiked; 10-02-11 at 02:38 PM.
jmiked is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 02:50 PM
  #9  
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Uncertain
Posts: 8,651
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by jmiked
I can't stand up to pedal because my knee will instantly go out from under me and I'll be on the ground, but as long as I'm sitting down I can get up some impressively steep hills (27 gears help).
In that case, even if you choose to go for a road bike, get one with a triple chainring, maybe a tourer, so you can keep the benefit of MTB low gearing.
chasm54 is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 03:32 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jmiked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 141

Bikes: Specialized Camber Elite 29er

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chasm54
so you can keep the benefit of MTB low gearing.
I was sort of looking at the Specialized Secteur Sport (52/42/30 chainring, 13-26t cassette) or Sport Triple (50/39/30 chainring, 12-27t cassette), as compared to my Camber 29er (44/32/22 chainring, 11-34t cassette).

It looks like the low range on either Sport is similar to the Camber low range I have (using Sheldon Brown's calculator).

Last edited by jmiked; 10-02-11 at 03:36 PM.
jmiked is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 03:42 PM
  #11  
Banned.
 
DnvrFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 20,917
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Age is not the factor of concern. A whole lot of us in our 70's ride a variety of bikes - in my case, 2 road bikes, a mtn bike, a recumbent,

The other factors are of more concern - $$, physical condition, where you want to ride and why, gearing.

Generally, even with a triple on the road bike, your road bike gearing is not going to be nearly as low (easy to pedal up a hill) as a mtn bike, which is geared VERY low. Of course, adjustments can be made, but, eventually you would not really have a road bike, IMHO.

Since you can not stand, this may be of concern, although I have no knee problems, and never stand while pedaling, except to relieve pressure on my butt.

I sure would try some out - and - your experience will be somewhat different (and likely better) than your 10 speed experiences, and a whole lot different from the 29".
DnvrFox is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 03:50 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
kr32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Waldorf Md.
Posts: 2,045

Bikes: Cannondale Six Carbon 5 and Gary Fisher Wahoo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I would say just keep riding the 29er, lock out the front and rear(while on the road if you want) and have fun.
Me I am a road bike guy, I do have a mtb but that is for trails ,you ride yours on the road now and are happy so why change. Like you said, you do not want to tear up the streets anyway.
kr32 is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 03:59 PM
  #13  
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 21,718

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1372 Post(s)
Liked 1,254 Times in 801 Posts
Strongly consider a used road touring bike, perhaps even a vintage one. You can save a lot of money if you avoid the high-demand collectibles, e.g. by buying a Peugeot PKN-10 instead of a PX-10.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 05:32 PM
  #14  
Old Fogy
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Murray, Utah
Posts: 1,225
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
What a silly question! Of course you need a road bike! Remember the N+1 rule.
waldowales is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 06:19 PM
  #15  
just keep riding
 
BluesDawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Milledgeville, Georgia
Posts: 13,560

Bikes: 2018 Black Mountain Cycles MCD,2017 Advocate Cycles Seldom Seen Drop Bar, 2017 Niner Jet 9 Alloy, 2015 Zukas custom road, 2003 KHS Milano Tandem, 1986 Nishiki Cadence rigid MTB, 1980ish Fuji S-12S

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Liked 33 Times in 22 Posts
Will buying a road bike cause you financial difficulty?

If yes - Don't bother. There is no reason you can't have a great time riding your 29er on the road, doing what it will do.

If no - Absolutely go for it. Road bikes are so much more suited for road riding that it will open up a whole new area of fun.
BluesDawg is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 06:58 PM
  #16  
Icantre Member
 
stonefree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: the Bayou City perpetually under construction
Posts: 384

Bikes: 2001 DBR Axis TT, 1998 Trek 5500 OCLV, 1993 Trek 1100, 1971 Raleigh Grand Prix, 1972 Gitane Attic Beater

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yes, everyone needs a road bike. I'm going to buy another one myself.
stonefree is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 08:22 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 626
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
When I had to take a break from running because of knee problems I picked up an entry level trek hybrid. I thought I would ride it a couple of times a week as a form of cross training but I immediately took to it and began exploring and having a great time. Within a couple of months the need for speed arose and I made the leap to a road bike (Specialized Secteur Elite). I love having both--with the hybrid I can do more rides out my front door and it's better for riding in the city and a better match for the riding some of my friends do. With the road bike I love the speed/riding position, and I also notice that I am challenging myself physically more than I think I would have with the hybrid. For me it's been great having different bikes to choose from.

Can you rent or borrow a rode bike and see how you like it?
mm718 is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 09:45 PM
  #18  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jmiked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 141

Bikes: Specialized Camber Elite 29er

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've got 4-5 months to make a decision on this, so I'm going to let it percolate in my subconscious for a while. I have my tax refund (February) earmarked for this. I need to get better at riding before I get out in traffic, anyway. I don't quite have my bike legs yet.

Thanks for the advice.
jmiked is offline  
Old 10-02-11, 10:07 PM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
Mobile 155's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Dallas Fort Worth Metroplex
Posts: 5,058

Bikes: 2013 Haro FL Comp 29er MTB.

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1470 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 43 Times in 34 Posts
You are ok if you just went in a looked at road bikes. If however you touched one you are in trouble. Road bike infection is not only possible but likely. As you sit and percolate on it the infection grows and soon will reach your brain. Once that happens N+1 stikes and you are toast.
Mobile 155 is offline  
Old 10-03-11, 06:50 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jmiked's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 141

Bikes: Specialized Camber Elite 29er

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Mobile 155
You are ok if you just went in a looked at road bikes. If however you touched one you are in trouble. Road bike infection is not only possible but likely. As you sit and percolate on it the infection grows and soon will reach your brain. Once that happens N+1 stikes and you are toast.
Yep. That's what happens. Same with guitars, it's the reason I have 12 of them.

Last edited by jmiked; 10-03-11 at 07:04 AM.
jmiked is offline  
Old 10-03-11, 07:20 AM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
Allegheny Jet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Medina, OH
Posts: 5,806

Bikes: confidential infromation that I don't even share with my wife

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Wish I could offer some good advice, but with 7 decent bikes in my garage I will sit on my hands. Possibly I can confuse the issue even more by suggesting a 2nd set of wheels with road tires. I believe that the new cyclo cross 700 wheels with disk brakes would work perfectly in a 29'er. The wheels would allow you to put road tires on the bike.
Allegheny Jet is offline  
Old 10-03-11, 07:53 AM
  #22  
Senior Member
 
BigBlueToe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Coast, CA
Posts: 3,392

Bikes: Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Maybe you can borrow one to see if you really like it.

I have several bikes: a lightweight, "fast" road bike; a tourer; a 26" mountain bike; a 29" mountain bike; an old, rigid Stumpjumper I use for a shopping bike.

I choose a bike based on the ride I'll be taking. Hands down, my favorite is the road bike. There's nothing quite as fun as zipping along on a lightweight, good-handling, properly-adjusted road bike where everything works silently like it should: shifters, derailleurs, brakes. It makes me feel like a kid - more than my other bikes.

Yes, you need a road bike.

BigBlueToe is offline  
Old 10-03-11, 10:43 AM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 319
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by jmiked
I'm riding a Specialized Camber Elite 29er mountain bike at the moment, which I like very much. I was in the LBS last week looking at road bikes, considering whether or not to put one on my wish list. My question is:

Given that I rarely go over 20mph or ride more than 25 miles on a trip, is there any real advantage to a separate road bike? The 29er seems to do just fine on paved roads. It doesn't have really aggressive tires, so it doesn't make a lot of noise or have a lot of rumble/vibration.

The only significant differences I can think of for a road bike are an 8-10 pound weight advantage and slightly better gearing for road use. Frankly that's not really enough to sway me much. And honestly, I like the comfort of the full-suspension Camber.

Any thoughts would be welcome.
Like everything else, it depends.

If you are going to limit your rides to less than 21 mph and never go over 25 miles, probably not. But it is possible that if you got a decent road bike, the bug would bite you. You would be going out and riding 50 miles. Then you would want to do a metric century, 63 miles. Then you would want to do a century. But then again maybe not.

Also I know people who ride long distances and stick to things like hybrids. So maybe for some inexplicable reason (I say this in jest being a confirmed road bike rider and I do not understand why anyone would ever ride with anything else), a road bike isn't for you.
PatW is offline  
Old 10-03-11, 12:45 PM
  #24  
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Posts: 19,913

Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by Allegheny Jet
Wish I could offer some good advice, but with 7 decent bikes in my garage I will sit on my hands. Possibly I can confuse the issue even more by suggesting a 2nd set of wheels with road tires. I believe that the new cyclo cross 700 wheels with disk brakes would work perfectly in a 29'er. The wheels would allow you to put road tires on the bike.
My problem with this is the original bike. I did this on a hard tail and set the forks up to have minimal movement and it rode well- problem was that it was still a heavy bike-The gearing was far too low and the Suspension still took some momentum away from my effort put in. Still did hilly metrics in 4 hours so It was not that bad a ride.


Originally Posted by jmiked
I was sort of looking at the Specialized Secteur Sport (52/42/30 chainring, 13-26t cassette) or Sport Triple (50/39/30 chainring, 12-27t cassette), as compared to my Camber 29er (44/32/22 chainring, 11-34t cassette).

It looks like the low range on either Sport is similar to the Camber low range I have (using Sheldon Brown's calculator).
Depends on your area and how hilly but I went triple 52/42/30 on my first road bike. After the MTB at 44/32/24- I never used the 52 unless it was downhill. Next bike had a compact 50/34 and I use the 50 fully. That 2t made a heck of a difference to me. Now have a triple 50/39/30 on one bike and for a hilly ride- that is perfect. The fall betwen the rings is perfect wheras the compact can be just a bit wide.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline  
Old 10-03-11, 01:26 PM
  #25  
Motorcycle RoadRacer
 
cehowardGS's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 3,828
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by RonH
I'm coming up on 67 and have only road bikes. If you look around you'll see that there are many others here who are 65+ and ride a road bike all the time.
Age doesn't count on the 50+ forum.
For a while there I thought I was out to lunch!!

All my bikes, 7 or 8, I forgot how many, but they are all ROAD BIKES. Not only that, just like my cars, I got no TOURERS either!!

All sport or race oriented bikes.. Couldn't have it any other way!!
cehowardGS is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.