Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fifty Plus (50+)
Reload this Page >

How hard is it to ride while you are high?

Fifty Plus (50+) Share the victories, challenges, successes and special concerns of bicyclists 50 and older. Especially useful for those entering or reentering bicycling.

How hard is it to ride while you are high?

Old 08-17-13, 03:33 PM
  #1  
dalameda
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 349
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
How hard is it to ride while you are high?

I'm talking high altitude of course. After seeing some of biker395's jawdroppingly spectacular photos of the Eastern Sierra. I signed up for the High Sierra Fall Century in September. I'll be traveling up from the sea level of the Bay Area on Friday, and doing the ride on Saturday. How much will the altitude impact the riding, and in what way? I saw a post from Dudelsack (and who wouldn't trust someone named Dudelsack) mentioning that altitude effects diminish with age. So, do I need to throw out the CO2 and Pack O2 instead or not?
dalameda is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 04:25 PM
  #2  
joelh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central NC
Posts: 117

Bikes: Waterford Rs 22, GT ZuM

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hard for me. I live in NC. Several years ago I took my bike to Breckenridge and did some riding. 9000 ft made climbing a real chore. Beautiful riding though.
joelh is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 04:27 PM
  #3  
Barrettscv 
Have bike, will travel
 
Barrettscv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Lake Geneva, WI
Posts: 12,034

Bikes: Ridley Helium SLX, Canyon Endurance SL, De Rosa Professional, Eddy Merckx Corsa Extra, Schwinn Paramount (1 painted, 1 chrome), Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Raleigh Roker, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 729 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 17 Posts
The effect will be substantial, especially if it's your first high elevation century. The better your condition, the lower the impact. Try to sleep at as low an altitude as possible the night before.
__________________
When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.
Barrettscv is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 04:32 PM
  #4  
CommuteCommando
Senior Member
 
CommuteCommando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Southern CaliFORNIA.
Posts: 3,044

Bikes: KHS Alite 500, Trek 7.2 FX , Masi Partenza, Masi Fixed Special, Masi Cran Criterium

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Work up to it, and it's easy. Go from sea level life to a hilly ride at +- 6k ft is a recipie for altitude sickness.
CommuteCommando is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 04:44 PM
  #5  
wn rider
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 63
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Looks like your ride will be primarily between 6500 ft and 8000 ft. Arnie Baker has written a book on "Altitude, Climbing, Endurance Training for Cyclists" and he notes that you should certainly expect a decrease in power output and a lowered max heart rate for high altitude climbing. Beyond that, some folks experience altitude sickness which is very unpredictable and varies considerably between individuals and may even vary for the same individual from time to time. He suggests that 8000 ft is a point where a sea level dweller may be more likely to observe some symptoms. I live at 4000 ft and have no issues when riding mountain passes up to 12000 ft in CO but I have a riding buddy who seems to have nausea issues when riding above 9000 ft or so. I think most people seem to be OK for anything less than 8000 ft but you never know and should be aware of some of the potential symptoms, which can include headaches, dizziness, vision issues, nausea, etc. Would not be good doing a screaming descent if you have any of this going on.

Be sure to eat and hydrate well.

Good luck on the ride!
wn rider is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 04:50 PM
  #6  
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Posts: 7,261
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 657 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
Try to sleep at as low an altitude as possible the night before.
That hasn't worked for me when backpacking in the Sierras. The first year we stayed at a hotel at low altitude before driving to the trailhead at about 9000' in the morning and we all suffered from altitude effects the first day. Since then we've camped at the trailhead the night before a trip and have felt much better.

Altitude effects vary considerably between individuals and being in good condition is no guarantee that you won't be significantly affected. Try not to overexert yourself early in the ride and make sure you stay well hydrated.
prathmann is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 05:28 PM
  #7  
Pamestique 
Shredding Grandma!
 
Pamestique's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: So Cal
Posts: 4,803

Bikes: I don't own any bikes

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dalameda View Post
I'm talking high altitude of course. After seeing some of biker395's jawdroppingly spectacular photos of the Eastern Sierra. I signed up for the High Sierra Fall Century in September. I'll be traveling up from the sea level of the Bay Area on Friday, and doing the ride on Saturday. How much will the altitude impact the riding, and in what way? I saw a post from Dudelsack (and who wouldn't trust someone named Dudelsack) mentioning that altitude effects diminish with age. So, do I need to throw out the CO2 and Pack O2 instead or not?
I have done that ride several times and have always come up the week of, at least 3 days before...you will be riding at 10,000' so keep that in mind. I have to say ts probably one of the most scenic centuries out there with lots of challenging climbs... maybe the age thing holds some truth... I remember many years ago hiking Mt. Whitney and getting ill. I regularly drive up now and do Big Bear (mountain biking) at 9,000 and although it takes alittle to get started I do OK...
__________________
______________________________________________________________

Private docent led mountain bike rides through Limestone Canyon. Go to letsgooutside.org and register today! Also available: hikes, equestrian rides and family events as well as trail maintenance and science study.
Pamestique is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 05:42 PM
  #8  
tsl
Plays in traffic
 
tsl's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 6,969

Bikes: 1996 Litespeed Classic, 2006 Trek Portland, 2013 Ribble Winter/Audax, 2016 Giant Talon 4

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Everyone reacts to altitude differently. My dad gets altitude sickness above about 8,500 feet, and that's behind the wheel of his Buick.

This had me concerned before I left to climb Mt Evans, just west of Denver. I arrived on a Monday night, rode around on Tuesday, then on Wednesday got a ride to 10,000 feet where we started the climb. I was certainly more winded than the locals I was with, and I don't remember much of the climb above 12,500 feet (took plenty of photos, and still don't remember it, but once at the top, I caught my breath and everything was okay.
tsl is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 05:54 PM
  #9  
Terex
Senior Member
 
Terex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: 7600' Northern New Mexico
Posts: 3,614

Bikes: Specialized 6Fattie, Parlee Z5, Scott Addict

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I live at 500 ft. - and 7,600 ft. It doesn't bother me going back and forth, but it very well could bother you. Check with your doctor for cautions and advice. Also discuss a prescription for Viagra. It can be effective in treating and preventing altitude sickness.

If you start to hyperventilate with exertion, stop, calm yourself, take deep, regular breaths and proceed after your breathing is in control. You may want to purchase a finger O2/pulse rate sensor to check your oxygenation level. The brand of the one I have is ChoiceMMed. Yes, with two "M's".

The biggest problem that most people face at high altitude is dehydration. Avoid alcohol in the days before your ride. Pre-hydrate the day before and really focus on hydration during your ride. Figure out how much you should be drinking, and make sure you drink that much, or more. If you go on instinct, you will probably under hydrate and increase the risk of misadventure. Good luck.

Last edited by Terex; 08-17-13 at 05:57 PM.
Terex is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 06:38 PM
  #10  
Dudelsack 
A might bewildered...
 
Dudelsack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Loovul
Posts: 6,529

Bikes: Bacchetta Giro ATT 26; Lemond Buenos Aires

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by dalameda View Post
I'm talking high altitude of course. After seeing some of biker395's jawdroppingly spectacular photos of the Eastern Sierra. I signed up for the High Sierra Fall Century in September. I'll be traveling up from the sea level of the Bay Area on Friday, and doing the ride on Saturday. How much will the altitude impact the riding, and in what way? I saw a post from Dudelsack (and who wouldn't trust someone named Dudelsack) mentioning that altitude effects diminish with age. So, do I need to throw out the CO2 and Pack O2 instead or not?
I wouldn't trust me, either. The fact that you don't is a virtue.

I can only share my anecdotes. 20 years ago, my family would take a ski vacation at Copper Mountain, which is at 9500 feet, give or take. I was always miserable the first few days from the altitude.

This past week, we spent 3 days at Erie, which is only 5500 feet or so, then we traveled up to the Copper Mountain area. Cycling is not as intense as Alpine skiing, and I didn't have much trouble with it. We cycled from Frisco to Vail Pass, one long long climb up to I'm guessing 11500 feet, and I did fine.

My Strava rating for the Copper to Vail Pass segment was 895 out of 900. Oh well.

So, if you're in reasonable shape and you don't push it too hard, I think you'll be fine.
__________________
We are on earth to help others; what on earth the others are here for I donít know.
Dudelsack is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 06:38 PM
  #11  
TiBikeGuy
Senior Member
 
TiBikeGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Singapore
Posts: 348

Bikes: Litespeed Ti Mtb, BikeE Recumbent, Cannondale H600 Hybrid,

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Many years ago I went to India to cycle from Manali to Lei. This was in North Eastern India near the Himalayan mountain range. The highest attitude we did was 17,500 ft above sea level. We have a guide in a 4x4 following us and a lorry that carried the tents, gear, live chickens, and kitchen.

The effects of attitude sickness, varies with different people. You start to get light headed, and if you over exert yourself on steep climbs, you get this feeling of tunnel vision, your breathing becomes difficult, your handlebars will start to wander and your legs start to feel heavy. It feels so surreal, other people talking to you sounds like an echo, like a dream. Rest and lots of water helps but getting down to a lower attitude is the only cure if nausea, vomitting and massive headaches occour. A good night's sleep at a slightly lower attitude with food and warm tea...does wonders to recovery from attitude sickness.
TiBikeGuy is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 06:43 PM
  #12  
joelh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central NC
Posts: 117

Bikes: Waterford Rs 22, GT ZuM

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hard for me. I live in NC. Several years ago I took my bike to Breckenridge and did some riding. 9000 ft made climbing a real chore. Beautiful riding though.
joelh is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 08:33 PM
  #13  
icyclist 
Spin Meister
 
icyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: California, USA
Posts: 2,635

Bikes: Trek …monda, 1961 Follis (French) road bike (I'm the original owner), a fixie, a mountain bike, etc.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 48 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts


If you are in good shape, then altitude won't bother you. You'll just ride slower than you would at sea level for the same effort. How much slower will depend on the altitude, and how steep the grade is.

A few weeks ago I made my annual 12 mile ride from Mono Lake up some 3000 feet to Tioga Pass, in Yosemite. At almost 10000 feet above sea level, I won't say reaching the pass was an easy ride. But it wasn't any harder than any other 12 mile, 3000 ft climb.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
medium.jpg (52.8 KB, 12 views)
__________________
This post is a natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and are in no way to be considered flaws or defects.
icyclist is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 09:04 PM
  #14  
dalameda
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 349
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks all for the very useful and helpful responses!
dalameda is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 09:26 PM
  #15  
DnvrFox
Banned.
 
DnvrFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 20,917
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Dudel - Vail Pass is about 10,600 depending on westbound or eastbound

No one can predict another's reaction to altitude. It does not necessarily depend on the shape one is in, and can vary from time to time for one individual,

There are different levels of altitude sickness -

1. Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) - Just plain old I don't feel great. Drink lots of water and no alcohol. There is a drug for altitude sickness prevention

2. High Altitude Pulmonary edema - (HAPE) fluid in the lungs - rare and very bad and potentially life threatening

3. High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) - more rare and clearly life threatening. May require hyperbaric therapy or room.

For 2 or 3 - get to a lower altitude ASAP.

While rare, there are cases of these each summer in the Colorado Mountains. These generally occur above 9,000 feet and up.

"How often do people in Colorado get HAPE?HAPE is much less common than AMS in Colorado. A survey done in Summit County showed 150 patients diagnosed with HAPE over a three year period. Others estimate it occurs in about one of every 10,000 skiers. Rarely does anyone die of HAPE in Colorado because medical care is readily available. About half of HAPE patients also experience AMS, leaving the other half without the ?warning' symptoms of headache and other AMS symptoms. Because of this, symptoms may be ignored until breathing becomes very difficult."

Last edited by DnvrFox; 08-17-13 at 09:35 PM.
DnvrFox is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 09:39 PM
  #16  
Shp4man
Senior Member
 
Shp4man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: San Diego
Posts: 993

Bikes: 1988 Peugeot PY-10P Frankenbike, 1994 Diamond Back Response Elite MTB. 1964 Schwinn Typhoon. 1977 Peugeot PRN10E, 2003 Performance M-201 MTB dirt rider. 1974 Bridgestone Sprinter, 2015 Scott Sub 10 Citybike.

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1661 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
It's damn hard. Ride sober, you'll be better off....
Shp4man is offline  
Old 08-17-13, 09:40 PM
  #17  
SlowAndSlower
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 151

Bikes: 2010 Scattante CFR, Soma Stanyan, Bruce Gordon R&R

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I rode from Yorktown to Guffey, Colorado where I had to bail because of the altitude at under 9,000 ft. Earlier in life I had backpacked from Wolf Creek Pass to Silverton, about 100 miles, along the divide at around 12,000 ft.
Age and life seems to have diminish the ability to handle the altitude.
SlowAndSlower is offline  
Old 08-18-13, 01:10 AM
  #18  
Biker395 
Seat Sniffer
 
Biker395's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: SoCal
Posts: 4,629

Bikes: 2008 Scott CR1 Pro; 2006 Schwinn Fastback Pro and 1996 Colnago Decor Super C96; 2003 Univega Alpina 700; 2000 Schwinn Super Sport

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 455 Post(s)
Liked 40 Times in 23 Posts
Originally Posted by dalameda View Post
I'm talking high altitude of course. After seeing some of biker395's jawdroppingly spectacular photos of the Eastern Sierra. I signed up for the High Sierra Fall Century in September. I'll be traveling up from the sea level of the Bay Area on Friday, and doing the ride on Saturday. How much will the altitude impact the riding, and in what way? I saw a post from Dudelsack (and who wouldn't trust someone named Dudelsack) mentioning that altitude effects diminish with age. So, do I need to throw out the CO2 and Pack O2 instead or not?
Aww. Thanks!

One thing I highly recommend if you can do it is to take in the June Lake Loop. The official ride skirts it and just descends US395 to the 120. Instead, take a left at the June Lake Junction and head down through the loop. The ride from there is mostly downhill, though terrific aspen forests, glacial lakes ... even a waterfall (Horsetail Falls). It adds some distance to the ride, but when you return to US395 at the north end of the loop, you'll only be a few hundred yards off the course.

Highly recommended, as it is easily the most beautiful part of the ride. I can map it out for you on ridewithgps if you'd like.

I've got other plans that weekend, so it looks like I'm gonna miss it.
__________________
Proud parent of a happy inner child ...
www.photo395.com
Biker395 is offline  
Old 08-18-13, 08:35 AM
  #19  
Hermes
Version 3.0
 
Hermes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: SoCal
Posts: 11,335

Bikes: Too Many

Mentioned: 283 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 563 Post(s)
Liked 62 Times in 47 Posts
The best advice I can offer, besides three weeks of acclimation, is to sleep low the night before and drive up early morning. Once you hit altitude, your body begins the adjustment which for most people decreases performance. In fact, day 3 is the worst. I traveled to La Paz, Bolivia years ago on business which is a 12,500 feet. It was very difficult and I could not sleep or function very well. Besides the lack of O2, there is a lack of atmospheric pressure that affects the body.

Realize that your hemoglobin is too low to process the same amount of O2 as at sea level. That means that your cardiovascular system must be derated and if you go anaerobic, there is less O2 to recover with. So the key is to stay within ones derated capability. Lower cadence can help since is relies on muscular strength and less cardio. However, lower cadence loads up and fatigues the legs more quickly.

I reduce my cadence and play around with it to find the best fit. Also, you can train now at lower cadence to get used to loading up your legs on the climbs. Good luck.
Hermes is offline  
Old 08-18-13, 10:01 AM
  #20  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 14,206

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 801 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by DnvrFox View Post
Dudel - Vail Pass is about 10,600 depending on westbound or eastbound

No one can predict another's reaction to altitude. It does not necessarily depend on the shape one is in, and can vary from time to time for one individual,

There are different levels of altitude sickness -

1. Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) - Just plain old I don't feel great. Drink lots of water and no alcohol. There is a drug for altitude sickness prevention

2. High Altitude Pulmonary edema - (HAPE) fluid in the lungs - rare and very bad and potentially life threatening

3. High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE) - more rare and clearly life threatening. May require hyperbaric therapy or room.

For 2 or 3 - get to a lower altitude ASAP.

While rare, there are cases of these each summer in the Colorado Mountains. These generally occur above 9,000 feet and up.

"How often do people in Colorado get HAPE?HAPE is much less common than AMS in Colorado. A survey done in Summit County showed 150 patients diagnosed with HAPE over a three year period. Others estimate it occurs in about one of every 10,000 skiers. Rarely does anyone die of HAPE in Colorado because medical care is readily available. About half of HAPE patients also experience AMS, leaving the other half without the ?warning' symptoms of headache and other AMS symptoms. Because of this, symptoms may be ignored until breathing becomes very difficult."
This is how I recall it from when I live in Denver. The ailments DFox describes are in addition to another: simple fatigue and reduced endurance due to mild hypoxia - lack of acclimation to the altitude. I first encountered this very mildly when I first moved to Denver, then a bit more severely when I took a walk in Georgetown (8000 feet?), then rather more severly when we drove up to Pike's Peak. Walking at 14,000 feet is much different from walking at 12,000 (Byer's Peak near Winter Park). Your initial fitness when arriving in Co can affect how easy it is to achieve acclimation, even if it has nothing to do with resistance to the other more serious ailments. It would seem (at least when going to Colorado) to make sense to stay a few days in Denver and do some steady-pace cycling at Denver's mile-high altitude (perhaps on the High Line and Cherry Creek and Platte River paths, out my back door!), then head up to the mountains. Similar strategy should work for the OP's high-altitude trip to the Sierras.
Road Fan is offline  
Old 08-18-13, 10:16 AM
  #21  
jppe
Let's do a Century
 
jppe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 7,381

Bikes: Cervelo R3 Disc, Pinarello Prince/Campy SR; Cervelo R3/Sram Red; Trek 5900/Duraace, Cervelo P2C/Duraace, Cannondle Tandem/Ultegra, Lynskey GR260 Ultegra

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 35 Times in 23 Posts
Well, my experience might be different than others but for me, just getting in good riding shape and staying within your limits works for me. I live and mostly ride at 700 ft above sea level. I've done Ride the Rockies the past 4 years and have not noticed any issues with the climbs or altitude. We typically do passes 9000'-11,000'+. I fly the day before we start riding and hit the road early the next day. I just make sure I'm in pretty good riding shape and then watch my Heart Rate while riding. It is usually about 5% lower than the same rides wth the same effort around the house. I did seem to have some faint headaches while climbing Wolf Creek Pass this past year but that could have been from the local brewery the night before.
__________________
Ride your Ride!!
jppe is offline  
Old 08-18-13, 10:22 AM
  #22  
DnvrFox
Banned.
 
DnvrFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 20,917
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by jppe View Post
Well, my experience might be different than others but for me, just getting in good riding shape and staying within your limits works for me. I live and mostly ride at 700 ft above sea level. I've done Ride the Rockies the past 4 years and have not noticed any issues with the climbs or altitude. We typically do passes 9000'-11,000'+. I fly the day before we start riding and hit the road early the next day. I just make sure I'm in pretty good riding shape and then watch my Heart Rate while riding. It is usually about 5% lower than the same rides wth the same effort around the house. I did seem to have some faint headaches while climbing Wolf Creek Pass this past year but that could have been from the local brewery the night before.
Yes, but we are speaking of mere humans here!
DnvrFox is offline  
Old 08-18-13, 10:56 AM
  #23  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,928

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6836 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 215 Times in 179 Posts
Th Acclimation to altitude is why the USCF Pro training is in Colorado.. Body will make more red Blood cells
to compensate ,

blood doping is an attempt to get away with gaining that Oxygen carrying capacity, that without moving to Nepal..


If you really struggle , maybe EPO is for you, ask your Doctor.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 08-18-13, 11:09 AM
  #24  
CHAS
Senior Member
 
CHAS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Silverthorne, Colorado
Posts: 636

Bikes: Rawlings Drakkar, Specialized Roubaix, Pivot, Challenge Trike, Tandem

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have lived at 9000 feet since 1994.
Most of the effects of altitude occur at over 8000 feet.
Before I moved here sometimes I would be affected simply by flying to Denver at 5280 feet. The effects on me varied widely.
Some people have little trouble others a lot.
My brother-in-law can not take high altitude so he does not come here. He has little trouble at Steamboat at 6600 feet.
If you can go to a higher altitude three days before the event you will ride much better.
CHAS is offline  
Old 08-18-13, 11:26 AM
  #25  
buelito
train safe
 
buelito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Broomfield, CO
Posts: 801
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Similar to jppe, I live at around 150 ft of altitude and try to get to Ride the Rockies every summer (have done 5). I fly out a couple of days beforehand and spend time with the grandkids--playing soccer and keeping up with them. Then I go on the ride and pace myself. Have not had issues with altitude--and like jppe says, we have done some pretty big climbs. Hydrate a LOT... if you are not going to the bathroom every hour or so, you are not drinking enough. This at least for the first day...that helps a lot with the altitude. If you can, sleep low, play high.

train safe-
buelito is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.