Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Fitting Your Bike
Reload this Page >

Sizing me crazy..

Notices
Fitting Your Bike Are you confused about how you should fit a bike to your particular body dimensions? Have you been reading, found the terms Merxx or French Fit, and don’t know what you need? Every style of riding is different- in how you fit the bike to you, and the sizing of the bike itself. It’s more than just measuring your height, reach and inseam. With the help of Bike Fitting, you’ll be able to find the right fit for your frame size, style of riding, and your particular dimensions. Here ya’ go…..the location for everything fit related.

Sizing me crazy..

Old 11-11-20, 10:31 AM
  #1  
Dave76
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Paris, France
Posts: 15

Bikes: Look KG 251, Genesis CDF 20, Trek FX 3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Sizing me crazy..

Hi everyone,
I've been driving myself mad with bike sizes lately (I know there are more important things in life but still..). I'm exactly in between sizes no matter which i look at things..
My APE index is even a solid 1....same arm span and height!! 186cm and 186cm !! So i guess it comes down to what do I feel more comfortable with. But even then I can find plusses and minuses all over the place.
I've been riding TREK FXs to and from work for a while now and the last one was a size Large that I found to be a bit bunched but it handled well. It gave my back a bit of jip so I then went a size up to an XL (22,5 inch) and all though I'm less cramped, it feels like I'm riding a tank and it's much less fun. Back is a bit better though.
So what would you do? A bit cramped and a bad back but lots of fun or a heavier sturdier ride minus the fun...

Last edited by Dave76; 11-11-20 at 10:38 AM.
Dave76 is offline  
Old 11-11-20, 10:49 AM
  #2  
Cycletography
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Gulf Coast, Florida
Posts: 115

Bikes: Electra Townie, Surly Ogre

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 34 Posts
What length is your stem? A longer stem on the smaller frame might move you in the right direction.
Cycletography is offline  
Old 11-11-20, 11:07 AM
  #3  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 16,776

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 106 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2585 Post(s)
Liked 620 Times in 461 Posts
So get a lighter, faster bike with the same effective top tube length. Carbon road bikes at reasonable prices are available. Do a web search. Though for commuting, a gravel bike would probably be better because of the larger tires. GravelKing tires get kudos. Light gravel bikes are common, too. Again, web search.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 11-11-20, 01:12 PM
  #4  
hsuBM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 221
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 83 Post(s)
Liked 69 Times in 50 Posts
Cramped setups make me bend my elbows more than I’d prefer.

I have a 57cm antique road frame that has bullhorns on a 60mm stem set low. My palms are on the ends of the horns rather comfortably much of the time.

I also have a 62cm a.r. frame that has classic drops on a ~90mm stem set at max height with the drops rotated such that the bottoms are level. I’m usually in the drops on that bike.

both bikes have nearly identical stack & reach BB-to-hand grip(?).

I definitely prefer the smaller bike (‘85 Trek 770) 95% of the time, but I’m 80% certain it’s due to the construction of the frame (rigid rear, flimsy floppy front triangle, medium fork). Before that frame came into my Sunny Day Ship of Theseus (replacing a series of Miyatas, Panasonics, etc.), my larger befendered Ship got ridden on a lot of sunny days- I currently think due to the taller-longer frames being more

———

You might look into different stem lengths and handlebar shapes.

Good luck on your journey.
hsuBM is online now  
Old 11-11-20, 01:39 PM
  #5  
Iride01
Hits [ENTER] b4 thinking
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 4,913

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '91 Schwinn Paramount '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1877 Post(s)
Liked 705 Times in 532 Posts
As you've found it's a compromise. Larger frames for me have been more ..... well I'm not sure how to describe. Sort of like driving a nice big sedan on a trip, so stable they seem to steer themselves. Smaller frames, none the less comfortable when properly fit, but handle like a sports car giving you more control to travel in groups and get around those that might be getting in your way.

I thought I'd ride my older and bigger frames on long open road trips. But I find that so far, I don't. The smaller frame is too fun..... like a little sports car.

Don't assume that your sizing for one particular model bike is the same for other models even when of the same manufacturer. If you fall in the overlap, you just have to trust your instinct and previous experience.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 11-11-20, 05:10 PM
  #6  
Cycletography
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Gulf Coast, Florida
Posts: 115

Bikes: Electra Townie, Surly Ogre

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 34 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Don't assume that your sizing for one particular model bike is the same for other models even when of the same manufacturer. If you fall in the overlap, you just have to trust your instinct and previous experience.
Or one could consult with a competent, well-experienced bike fitter who will get you onto the right size frame before you buy the bike. Just sayin'.

I know there are plenty of bad bike fitters in the wild, and the advent of proprietary fit systems has made things worse IMO. So... I will fully admit that finding a really good fitter it not always easy. However, when you do connect with an independent, professional fitter with the right skills and expertise it makes a huge difference.

And if one has already purchased the bike, a good bike fitter is likely still the best solution. Proper fit is not as easy as a lot of people assume.
Cycletography is offline  
Old 11-21-20, 03:37 PM
  #7  
philbob57
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Chicago North Shore
Posts: 1,512

Bikes: frankenbike based on MKM frame

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Liked 182 Times in 109 Posts
Why would you even think of over-stressing your back?

I'd probably get a longer stem, or something that puts the 'bars higher, or both before I bought a larger bike.
philbob57 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.