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Saddle to Bar Drop and Hood Angle

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Saddle to Bar Drop and Hood Angle

Old 09-05-23, 07:27 PM
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Saddle to Bar Drop and Hood Angle

I wanted to ask if this logic makes sense.

When I was younger and more flexible I had more saddle to bar drop and my hoods were flatter (more perpendicular to the ground).

Recently Iíve raised the handlebars and feel like I need to tilt the hoods towards me.

I think this is about the angle of my arms and having a comfortable wrist/arm angle when on the hoods. My wrists are not hinged, and I think thatís key.

Is there more to it?
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Old 09-05-23, 08:29 PM
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It's all about comfort...when you are comfortably 'fitted' to the bike you are also more efficient hence faster and able to carry the speed for a longer time...until your legs, lungs and heart call it a day of course.
Most lose some flexibility as they age and their fit needs to keep up with current physiology perhaps requiring the changes you describe.
I'd rather be comfortable on my bike resulting in longer and more enjoyable rides.
Fortunately I am very flexible and still have the same basic fit as I did in the '80's...I'm 68 now.
Do you have a daily stretching routine? More than a couple of minutes I mean. I stretch for around 15 minutes daily and it is very helpful in my every day life as well as cycling.
I think the same holds true for all cyclists...paid or otherwise. I've heard over and over that those positions you see on TV races are only for the pro's as they are paid to be in such uncomfortable positions. I disagree...for these people their fittings are exacting to get the most out of their position for hours long racing. They are also, in general, far younger and more fit as well as getting massages, etc. pretty much on a daily basis. If they are 'uncomfortable'...it is likely they are unable to achieve maximum efforts during the hours of racing without breaking down due to the poor position. Honestly when I watch them, and I do quite closely to see how they are positioned on their bikes, I see riders that are as perfectly positioned on their bikes in order to achieve efficiency and output while looking comfortable.
If changing the position of your shifters, height of the bars, etc. makes you more comfortable the benefits will be the ability to ride longer, in comfort, and perform at a higher level because you are not fighting your body and bike trying to get comfortable...that is a mind/body game that you will lose every time.
Enjoy riding in whatever position is most beneficial to your body...
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Old 09-06-23, 07:45 AM
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It is all about comfort. But it can also be all about performance. Sometimes the two go hand in hand and other times compromises must be made and a decision on which to favor.

Originally Posted by Noonievut
I think this is about the angle of my arms and having a comfortable wrist/arm angle when on the hoods. My wrists are not hinged, and I think that’s key.

Is there more to it?
Only when you miss something else you should have considered. That's why sometimes you just need to ask someone to take a look at you. Or describe to us here what issues you are having. But since you haven't tried this and therefore have no issues to tell us about, then what can we do?

It does make sense to change the angle of the hoods to give you a comfortable angle to hold on to them.
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Old 09-06-23, 06:37 PM
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Back in the day, folks would have their hoods halfway down their hooks. Different hood style though. Nowadays, every one does it like this: Handle bar tilt - How much is too much?
- different hood shape, different fit, different riding style. You want to be able to have horizontal forearms with the heels of your hands resting on the bar That's how the aero position is done now..
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Old 09-07-23, 02:11 PM
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Tilting the bar up can render the drops unusable. The hands will tend to slide off the bar ends. The default position for dual-control levers is dead-level, but if tilting them up a little works for you, by all means do it. After tilting, however, you might find the levers out of reach from the drops. Most brands and models allow reach adjustment. Be sure to take advantage of this.
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Old 09-08-23, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by oldbobcat
Tilting the bar up can render the drops unusable. The hands will tend to slide off the bar ends. The default position for dual-control levers is dead-level, but if tilting them up a little works for you, by all means do it. After tilting, however, you might find the levers out of reach from the drops. Most brands and models allow reach adjustment. Be sure to take advantage of this.
Just curious how you reason that.

Until the drops are almost vertical or beyond and starting to point forward, I don't see how the cyclist's body will be in a position to simply slide off the bar ends. I'm thinking the OP is talking about something less than horizontal. Maybe 45į to the horizontal at the most. Shouldn't be a issue at all.

Now if you don't like the looks of drop bars with the drops angled down, I might could understand. I don't like road bikes having stems that angle up. I'm indifferent about the drop angle though.
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Old 09-11-23, 04:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01
Just curious how you reason that.
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Old 09-12-23, 07:30 AM
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Originally Posted by oldbobcat
Still don't see how ones hands will slide off the drops from just rotating the bars up. Nice bike. Especially like the color.
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Old 09-19-23, 05:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Noonievut
I wanted to ask if this logic makes sense.

When I was younger and more flexible I had more saddle to bar drop and my hoods were flatter (more perpendicular to the ground).

Recently Iíve raised the handlebars and feel like I need to tilt the hoods towards me.

I think this is about the angle of my arms and having a comfortable wrist/arm angle when on the hoods. My wrists are not hinged, and I think thatís key.

Is there more to it?
No, I think you nailed it.
I like to have a straight line through my wrist from fore-arm to the knuckle of my middle finger. That usually feels like my wrist is neutral and not bent, having no stress.

So it seems to me that if the saddle - bar drop decreases (bar is raised or saddle is dropped) the torso lean becomes a little less and the arm position changes a little. When I make this adjustment I tend to think about if the bar tilt or shifter position needs to change to neutralize my wrist angle.
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