Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Folding Bikes
Reload this Page >

Expanded Tern recall

Notices
Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

Expanded Tern recall

Old 08-30-17, 07:33 PM
  #151  
Technician
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Sure, that's standard on all my alloy bikes my folder included. I'm referring to examples like the one posted earlier in I think it was this thread, was it your good self or someone called it internal webbing ? Welded from the outside but fitted internally to bolster the hinge area. Now to me at least that's not the best way of adding strength, on steel maybe but aluminium not so sure. Has to be a better way. Ideas anyone.....?
Technician is offline  
Old 08-30-17, 08:46 PM
  #152  
jur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 7,391
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 318 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
See this:
https://www.bikeforums.net/19526349-post18.html

See the welding section perpendicular to the hinge face? That is MUCH stronger because the failure mode is shear stress whereas with the butt weld the stress is normal, nowhere near as strong. The longitudinal weld is on an internal web also shown through a hole in that post. The best case would be if that internal web was one piece with the hinge plate; in this instance it is also welded to the hinge face, so effectively all the hinge face welds add together for total weld strength. The extra welding over and above the original welding is therefore effectively the extra bit that attaches the internal web to the hinge face.
jur is offline  
Old 08-31-17, 02:57 AM
  #153  
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Merry Old England
Posts: 738

Bikes: Muddyfox Evolve 200, Bicycles4u Paris Explorer, Raleigh Twenty Stowaway, Bickerton California, Saracen Xile, Kona Hoss Deluxe, Vertigo Carnaby, Exodus Havoc, Kona Lanai, Revolution Cuillin Sport, Dawes Kingpin, Bickerton, NSU & Elswick Cosmopolitan

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 282 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Big manufacturer's like fuji-ta do a range of strength options for frames depending on how light the customer wants the frame and more importantly how much they are willing to pay. Unsure myself about the strength variation of the different hinge designs they do but it's clear they will fit a additional strengthening section between seat tube and bottom of downtube plus another additional plate between underside of top of downtube and headtube. You see them either fitted or not fitted to the same frame designs. It's an additional process and obviously adds to the cost of the frame. My point is I don't think manufacturer's are unsure what makes a strong frame they know exactly what to do but have to balance it with manufacturing costs and performance of the bike. Yes a hinge design can be improved but to be certified the bike will have to undergo a series of tests of the frame.

Anyway I was going to ask if anyone had seen any good videos on the Tern factory or factories. Can't seem to find any. Easy to find Brompton or Dahon but I was just interested to see their processes and whether aluminium frames are manufactured in-house or bought in. It can be another factor where a supplier of poor frames is simply dropped and orders go to another factory. Alternatively they originally bought in the frames, then later started manufacturing them in-house to a lower quality at least initially. I'm just making the point other factors may be in play rather than simply poor hinge mechanism replaced with improved hinge mechanism.

I can't remember the brand but it won't clearly state the aluminium of its frames, gives the aluminium some meaningless generic name because it juggles frame manufacturers for the same model and some are 7005 and some 6061 depending on manufacturer and end market.

Actually I remember now its Specialized with their A1 Premium Aluminium which of course doesn't exist as a real aluminium material. Sometimes with frame recalls you need to know the frame number not just because of when it was made but who actually made it. If the frame recall doesn't effect all bikes sold over the same timeline then multiple manufacturers may be involved.

I'm pretty sure when Tern started they were buying in frames, I think I read it somewhere or saw it on a video and considering their hydroformed design etc they look pretty much state of the art for aluminium. It's certainly possible they made the investment to bring in such technology but considering their high retail price I think they could certainly afford to pay another manufacturer to manufacture their frames.

I'd also point out that companies like btwin design their own frames but have them made by large manufacturers in China like fuji-ta. The big recall of btwin e-bikes that meant 4 years of bikes had to be recalled was their design and fuji-ta's own designs are nothing like those of btwin. If Tern designed their own frame and fuji-ta followed their specification exactly I don't think you can really criticise the actual manufacturer. Not that I'm saying that is the scenario for sure.

Just as an example of a folding bike, Btwin originally bought in a generic fuji-ta designed folding bike to rebrand as their own. It's a common design you see under many different brands with or without additional strengthening.



They then replaced it with their own design which no one else sells.



My point here is creating your own unique design is higher risk. Using a tried and trusted design that has been used by a huge number of brands means its gone through all the feedback of companies complaining of where a frame has failed for them and where they are getting returns etc. You have a process of improvement. The process of overhauling the frame designs every year to remain fresh on the marketplace is not always a good thing.

Also on the bike above it clearly cost Btwin to design their own frame, their design is more expensive and they have lowered the quality of components to compensate. What was a entry level Shimano derailleur is now a no brand generic derailleur and other parts have been lowered in quality. On the single speed version you do not even get folding pedals now. The earlier Hoptown model was far superior even if dull styling.
Bonzo Banana is offline  
Old 08-31-17, 07:31 AM
  #154  
Technician
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yep that's the picture I was talking about, lets have a closer look at it. So we have some kind of internal abutment fitted into the end of the frame welded to the hinge and also at the bottom of the frame itself. Here's a question...on the bottom weld would there have been a slot cut in the frame for the abutment to be welded, or was the weld accomplished by just cutting through the frame with a torch to the structure inside and fusing it together. Now I'll admit I'm certainly no expert on the matter but as I understand it aluminium welds unlike steel are not as strong as the parent metal, so here we have a weld where at one time there was none. I have to say I'm having difficulty understanding how cutting into the frame with a weld actually makes it stronger, even allowing for any extra bracing it may achieve in doing so.
I'm intrigued to know if this new weld configuration is now standard on all Tern frames.
Technician is offline  
Old 08-31-17, 07:50 AM
  #155  
downtube
Senior Member
 
downtube's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 1,480

Bikes: Many Downtube Folders :)

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 272 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 7 Posts
Maybe Mr. Bickerton wants to add Tern's findings here?

Thanks,
Yan
__________________
Designer of Downtube Folding Bike
Ph.D. Temple University ( Math )
Biked across the USA twice
Semi-active chess player ( two time Bahamas National Champion )
Sivananda ( Bahamas ) Trained Yoga instructor ( 2013 ) and ThetaHealer since 2013
Bicycle delivery worker for Jimmy John's. Delivering is the best workout I have ever had.
downtube is offline  
Old 08-31-17, 10:01 AM
  #156  
Technician
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
From what I'm hearing on the cyclists grapevine, that as a result of the new hinge configuration bikes produced from around 2015 onwards will not suffer from the same issue as previous models.
Nothing heard on the iffy weld problem if indeed the welding was problematic. It does seem really odd that the troublesome bikes were produced in different factories at different times by different welders using different equipment etc. so where's the correlation ?
Technician is offline  
Old 08-31-17, 03:42 PM
  #157  
bhkyte
Senior Member
 
bhkyte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: York UK
Posts: 3,027

Bikes: 2X dualdrive Mezzo folder,plus others

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 106 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Correlation is the deceitful way of dealing with this issue by Tern.
Closed, edited forums, blame factories, non full disclosure of bike effected......from what I have seen in my research on the matter
bhkyte is offline  
Old 08-31-17, 05:04 PM
  #158  
jur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 7,391
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 318 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Technician View Post
From what I'm hearing on the cyclists grapevine, that as a result of the new hinge configuration bikes produced from around 2015 onwards will not suffer from the same issue as previous models.
Nothing heard on the iffy weld problem if indeed the welding was problematic. It does seem really odd that the troublesome bikes were produced in different factories at different times by different welders using different equipment etc. so where's the correlation ?
We've given the info before. Enough said. Correlation is blazingly obvious.
jur is offline  
Old 08-31-17, 06:38 PM
  #159  
Technician
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
As there's never been any official explanation as to why the welds gave way under stress, all talk on the subject is of course purely speculative. I don't know exactly what went wrong and neither do you, but we can of course guess.
Just to point out the obvious, there are hundreds, thousands probably of different folding bike designs many of which share Tern's style and configuration of bike frame & fold/latch mechanism. Why then do we not see folders cracking by the tens of thousands worldwide ?
What single common denominator (can't think of a better word off hand) links all the frames that failed but doesn't cross over to those that didn't. If and when Tern come out of the closet and explain exactly what the cause of these failures was, people will keep on guessing.
Technician is offline  
Old 08-31-17, 06:38 PM
  #160  
dahoneezz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 336
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Technician View Post
From what I'm hearing on the cyclists grapevine, that as a result of the new hinge configuration bikes produced from around 2015 onwards will not suffer from the same issue as previous models.
Nothing heard on the iffy weld problem if indeed the welding was problematic. It does seem really odd that the troublesome bikes were produced in different factories at different times by different welders using different equipment etc. so where's the correlation ?


See the pic. I believe both the pics I posted came from poster Christineengland. You can google for more on the net. Most of the failure appear to be clean break at the weld. Hardly any deformation/material rupture/tearing of the aluminium tube or the hinge plates. If it breaks at the weld, changing/strengthening the hinge will not fix the problem.
dahoneezz is offline  
Old 08-31-17, 08:23 PM
  #161  
Technician
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Seen that pic many times, clean break in the weld no doubt about it although there's some confusion about that thinking back. The bike store (Evans) where she got it from said the break was due to excess stress on the whole assembly due to the hinge bolts becoming loose through lack of service. That was scoffed at the suggestion being they were just trying to shift the blame.
As I recall the lady had told them she always folded the bike away securely after use, but that's not what the store was on about. The point about the loose bolts is valid, although I wouldn't like to say if that was so in her case.
It's well known that if hinge bolts or any moving part of the assembly become even the tiny bit loose it throws more stress on the joint. That said you would not expect a sudden catastrophic failure to result unless the welds were not up to the mark.
I believe the new approach is as jur has pointed out, a stronger reinforced area around the hinge combined with a new more secure latch design, belt & braces as it were.
Technician is offline  
Old 08-31-17, 09:12 PM
  #162  
tds101 
Wake up!!!
 
tds101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Mastic Beach, NY
Posts: 3,225

Bikes: 9+,...

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 708 Post(s)
Liked 191 Times in 112 Posts
The welds failed,...wth is the confusion??? Really,... it's a case of faulty welding. Stop debating it.
__________________
If it wasn't for you meddling kids,...
tds101 is offline  
Old 09-01-17, 06:58 AM
  #163  
Technician
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't think anyone anywhere is disputing the fact that the welds have failed and broken, I'm certainly not. The question is and always will be why. Just poor welding and work practice ? could be, but remember these frames were constructed in more than one factory by different people using different equipment, I would say that's fairly unlikely.
There's also the fact that in the overall scheme of things a relatively small amount of bike frames have actually broken. ok even one is one too many, but what about all the others out there. I gather thousands were produced during the time of the bad batches so are thousands of Tern bikes all falling to pieces worldwide ?
On a side note there's been lots of talk over the months on legal action against Tern for what happened, did anyone successfully achieve compensation through the courts with an admission of guilt by Tern, just wondering.....
Technician is offline  
Old 09-01-17, 09:41 AM
  #164  
tds101 
Wake up!!!
 
tds101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Mastic Beach, NY
Posts: 3,225

Bikes: 9+,...

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 708 Post(s)
Liked 191 Times in 112 Posts
It's a shoddy weld design, and somehow the "loose hinge" thing keeps getting thrown around. That's placing blame on the owners of all the defective bikes, instead of looking at how the weld JUST GAVE WAY. This is a bad design that was structurally unsound, and more that one model of Tern was using the same weld design.

This is the same as blaming a r**e victim, or a robbery victim. "If you didn't show leg, you wouldn't have been r***d", or "if you had kept your cellphone in your pocket/purse, you wouldn't have been robbed".

This is a clear case of a structural defect. It's a case where a company (Tern) tried to cover it up, instead of offering to help AND prevent future injuries/damage. It's NOT the users fault,...unlike what SOME HAVE CONSTANTLY STATED!

PS: I'm a TernJoeP24 owner,...my bike is built like a tank. I'm still a bit worried riding it.
__________________
If it wasn't for you meddling kids,...

Last edited by tds101; 09-01-17 at 09:44 AM.
tds101 is offline  
Old 09-01-17, 02:19 PM
  #165  
tcs
Palmer
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 6,217

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ˝DT14

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 695 Post(s)
Liked 181 Times in 125 Posts
We've given the info before. Enough said. Correlation is blazingly obvious.
Stop debating it.
At a certain point one begins wonder if the posters who have presented clear explanations with supporting evidence are just being trolled.
tcs is offline  
Old 09-01-17, 02:44 PM
  #166  
tcs
Palmer
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 6,217

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ˝DT14

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 695 Post(s)
Liked 181 Times in 125 Posts
Originally Posted by Bonzo Banana View Post
Anyway I was going to ask if anyone had seen any good videos on the Tern factory or factories. Can't seem to find any.
As far as I have been able to research, there are no Tern factories. This is not unusual in the bicycle world - in fact, most of the bikes down at your LBS were built by a company different from the name on the bike's decal.

It's comparatively rare for a bike company to build inhouse these days - which is why Brompton and Dahon feature their factory videos on Youtube.

I'm pretty sure when Tern started they were buying in frames...
IIRC, Tern's first (& only public?) explanation for the frame failures was 'process problem on a small batch of frames from a subcontractor we no longer use'.
tcs is offline  
Old 09-01-17, 03:44 PM
  #167  
Technician
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Don't get me wrong, I haven't got an axe to grind or drum to bang and as I don't own a Tern bike myself it's irrelevant whether they fall to pieces or not. What I find interesting is after several years of accidents & incidents, accusations and threats, claim and counter claim not to mention the occasional broken bone and face plant, it seems no one company or individual has ever been brought to task over the whole sorry affair. So frames were built that were not up to the task and as a result people got injured, however neither Tern or anyone else were ever prosecuted as a result. Weird..
Technician is offline  
Old 09-01-17, 03:48 PM
  #168  
downtube
Senior Member
 
downtube's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 1,480

Bikes: Many Downtube Folders :)

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 272 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by tcs View Post


IIRC, Tern's first (& only public?) explanation for the frame failures was 'process problem on a small batch of frames from a subcontractor we no longer use'.
Well they had failures from at least two different factories.

Additionally in the CPSC recall page it states that there were only minor cuts & scrapes in two recalls. I have seen photos and read that several people were seriously injured.

Thanks
Yan
__________________
Designer of Downtube Folding Bike
Ph.D. Temple University ( Math )
Biked across the USA twice
Semi-active chess player ( two time Bahamas National Champion )
Sivananda ( Bahamas ) Trained Yoga instructor ( 2013 ) and ThetaHealer since 2013
Bicycle delivery worker for Jimmy John's. Delivering is the best workout I have ever had.
downtube is offline  
Old 09-02-17, 05:25 AM
  #169  
dahoneezz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 336
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Technician View Post
On a side note there's been lots of talk over the months on legal action against Tern for what happened, did anyone successfully achieve compensation through the courts with an admission of guilt by Tern, just wondering.....
At the end of the day, the factories are in China.

Apple loses China trademark case for 'iPhone' on leather goods | Reuters

See ...
dahoneezz is offline  
Old 09-02-17, 07:12 AM
  #170  
Technician
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I was under the impression Tern was a US based organisation where litigation is the norm. Or could it just simply be that there's nothing to answer to. Accidents happen and I'm sure frame breaks were not part of some conspiracy to boost casualty rates !
Since as no one has come back and posted any answer to my question were any successful claims made against Tern, it seems safe to assume none were ever made. Could that be because people involved in accidents thought they'd be wasting their time, or were they advised negligence (or whatever) would be difficult to prove.
Technician is offline  
Old 09-02-17, 07:26 AM
  #171  
Bonzo Banana
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Merry Old England
Posts: 738

Bikes: Muddyfox Evolve 200, Bicycles4u Paris Explorer, Raleigh Twenty Stowaway, Bickerton California, Saracen Xile, Kona Hoss Deluxe, Vertigo Carnaby, Exodus Havoc, Kona Lanai, Revolution Cuillin Sport, Dawes Kingpin, Bickerton, NSU & Elswick Cosmopolitan

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 282 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by tcs View Post
As far as I have been able to research, there are no Tern factories. This is not unusual in the bicycle world - in fact, most of the bikes down at your LBS were built by a company different from the name on the bike's decal.

It's comparatively rare for a bike company to build inhouse these days - which is why Brompton and Dahon feature their factory videos on Youtube.



IIRC, Tern's first (& only public?) explanation for the frame failures was 'process problem on a small batch of frames from a subcontractor we no longer use'.
That's interesting I hadn't even considered that. I thought they would at least have their own assembly plant even if frames in addition to parts were bought in. I understand about most bike brands not having their own factory and just being a brand slap but the Tern bikes didn't really fit into that profile very well, I always think of that more as generic bikes. Saying that its clear fuji-ta for example make complete bikes for many big brands like Cannondale etc. So are we basically saying Tern design a bike frame and their own recipe for which components are fitted and then tender the contract to various manufacturers some better than others?

If its a subcontractor though that implies frames from a different company than the final assembly of the bike. Although the wording 'subcontractor' may not be accurate and simply used because it sounds better than stating 'manufacturer of the bike'.

I've looked at the recall of the Tern bikes and the frames look pretty generic and could be hand welded at numerous small factories in China. I guess even when using hydroformed shaped tubing they could still buy in just the tubing and a low quality facility could weld them into a pretty sophisticated looking frame. Also some of the Tern decals on pretty standard frames almost look like they are imitating a hydro-formed tube appearance.

The more I read about Tern the more their price premium looks unwarranted to the end consumer because if they are juggling multiple manufacturers to get the best price so they can achieve the highest margin the end consumer basically has no idea what quality bike they are getting. You can have the same model bike owned by different people and one may be strong enough for use for 20 years and the another may be close to failure with a high chance of personal injury or even death. The brand is more a lifestyle choice rather than representing a quality level.
Bonzo Banana is offline  
Old 09-02-17, 08:28 AM
  #172  
downtube
Senior Member
 
downtube's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Greensboro, NC
Posts: 1,480

Bikes: Many Downtube Folders :)

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 272 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by Technician View Post
I was under the impression Tern was a US based organisation where litigation is the norm. Or could it just simply be that there's nothing to answer to. Accidents happen and I'm sure frame breaks were not part of some conspiracy to boost casualty rates !
Since as no one has come back and posted any answer to my question were any successful claims made against Tern, it seems safe to assume none were ever made. Could that be because people involved in accidents thought they'd be wasting their time, or were they advised negligence (or whatever) would be difficult to prove.
I imported bikes into the UK about 10 years ago. I recall the customers were more demanding than USA customers. At the time it bothered me.

Now I am amazed how forgiving the UK customers have been in Tern's forum. They are a really great group!

Thanks
Yan
__________________
Designer of Downtube Folding Bike
Ph.D. Temple University ( Math )
Biked across the USA twice
Semi-active chess player ( two time Bahamas National Champion )
Sivananda ( Bahamas ) Trained Yoga instructor ( 2013 ) and ThetaHealer since 2013
Bicycle delivery worker for Jimmy John's. Delivering is the best workout I have ever had.
downtube is offline  
Old 09-02-17, 08:32 AM
  #173  
Technician
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
As we all know if you want quality it comes at a price. Look at the Tern Verge X11 it's a fancy piece of kit, but is it worth several grand or is it a case of style over substance. I would have thought pedalling a bike up a steep hill using a 52-42 setup would use more energy than pushing it up, I'm having visions of Roadrunner here.
Technician is offline  
Old 09-02-17, 08:47 AM
  #174  
Technician
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Not so sure I'd be that forgiving if I'd ended up in traction as a result of a dodgy bike frame. Still it does seem odd that no one pushed it further despite all the " it's in the hands of my solicitor " talk.
Technician is offline  
Old 09-02-17, 09:56 AM
  #175  
tds101 
Wake up!!!
 
tds101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Mastic Beach, NY
Posts: 3,225

Bikes: 9+,...

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 708 Post(s)
Liked 191 Times in 112 Posts
According to a CPSC website search theres definitely more than one model to be wary of:
https://www.cpsc.gov/search?site=cps...r=p&query=tern
__________________
If it wasn't for you meddling kids,...
tds101 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.