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Old 11-01-17, 09:03 AM   #1
Rob_E
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Preferred pedals?

Pedals on my Downtube have been great, but a year in and one was squeaky. Looking at it, it doesn't appear to be user serviceable in any way that I can see. I was able to squirt some grease into the cracks and quiet the squeaking, but the fact that there are gaps at all don't give me confidence in these pedals long-term.

So what do you prefer? It looks like I can get some quick release MKS pedals, because at least those I know how to service (don't like to, but I know how ). But before I pull the trigger, what are your preferred folding/quick release pedals?
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Old 11-01-17, 09:26 AM   #2
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It looks like I can get some quick release MKS pedals, because at least those I know how to service (don't like to, but I know how ).
I like the MKS AR2-EZ detachable pedals. Like you, I *can* service them, but prefer not to. I have had to service them when the inboard bearings get rusty. I discovered that with a good (long and wide) front mudflap, the service interval is *greatly* extended. I have a pair with over 20,000 miles on it.
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Old 11-01-17, 09:37 AM   #3
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A530 Shimano clipless---not folding but an awesome pedal. I ride clipless on my mountain bikes and ride both clipless and street shoes on my folder.

From my 30+ years owning a bike shop it is rarely the pedal that is making noise---it is almost always the crank arm bb spindle junction. Put another set of pedal on the bike to check---they will squeak too---it is not the pedals.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Shimano-PD-...-/332074230193

I hate folding pedals and would much rather carry a pedal wrench and remove the pedal when I need to ---not very often.
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Old 11-01-17, 10:50 AM   #4
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A530 Shimano clipless---not folding but an awesome pedal. I ride clipless on my mountain bikes and ride both clipless and street shoes on my folder.

From my 30+ years owning a bike shop it is rarely the pedal that is making noise---it is almost always the crank arm bb spindle junction. Put another set of pedal on the bike to check---they will squeak too---it is not the pedals.
I don't ride clipless, but thanks for the tip. In this case it was pretty clearly the pedal. While I never went so far as to put a different pedal on, I did remove the pedal, squeeze some grease into into it, and put it back on. No more squeak. The fact that there were cracks where the spindle met the pedal body big enough for me to get grease in and onto the bearings tells me that it's very likely that the pedals are prone to letting water in there.

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I hate folding pedals and would much rather carry a pedal wrench and remove the pedal when I need to ---not very often.
I might consider a pedal that can be removed with an allen key, but i would prefer a tool-less system. When I ride my folding bike, it's often because I am anticipating needing to fold it up at some point, so while I wouldn't be taking the pedals off every day, I might be taking them off most of the times I rode that bike.
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Old 11-01-17, 10:53 AM   #5
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Experimented with MKS Esprit EZY superior for a while; they were good.
Currently using/experimenting with MKS EZY US-S/SPD compatible clipless.
Kinda heavy; but seems nice. I also have a set of Ti Parts Workshop's titanium
copy of MKS Compact on order.
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Old 11-02-17, 10:10 AM   #6
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The MKS EZY pedal pops off instantly and can be rebuilt with simple tools. The bearing races wear quickly for me, but I just keep putting waterproof grease in there and hoping for the best.

I have been running the "superior" version of the MKS for a couple years, maybe 6K miles now. It takes 5 or 10 seconds to get the pedal off due to a locking feature. The bearings are sealed units; less user serviceable I think, but I have not tried. They remain as smooth and free of play as when new. I will not buy another MKS EZY; the bearings wear out too fast for me.

You should use pedal washers with MKS quick release pedals. I had both pedals loosen up once; they damaged the crank arm surface it seats against. I got the washers (and pedals) from Compass cycles.

Last edited by sleepycactus; 11-02-17 at 10:13 AM. Reason: added info
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Old 11-02-17, 11:28 AM   #7
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I wish someone would come with an adapter (titanium of course) that you could put on regular pedals to make them quick release.
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Old 11-02-17, 03:45 PM   #8
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I wish someone would come with an adapter (titanium of course) that you could put on regular pedals to make them quick release.
A titanium pedal wrench?
Steve
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Old 11-02-17, 03:52 PM   #9
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A titanium pedal wrench?
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Old 11-04-17, 05:39 PM   #10
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No joke, I already carry around a wrench,
but it's for general use, not just my pedals.
That said, I've been looking for an easier solution for my pedals,
so it's very timely that I noticed this thread.

Can anyone explain how the quick-release works on the MKS pedals?
Is it like a hose quick-release? (push to lock, and pull to release)

Oh, wait...do they just screw on and off?

Last edited by herotimeyeah; 11-04-17 at 05:51 PM.
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Old 11-04-17, 06:18 PM   #11
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No joke, I already carry around a wrench,
but it's for general use, not just my pedals.
That said, I've been looking for an easier solution for my pedals,
so it's very timely that I noticed this thread.

Can anyone explain how the quick-release works on the MKS pedals?
Is it like a hose quick-release? (push to lock, and pull to release)

Oh, wait...do they just screw on and off?
I think it's a push and twist.
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Old 11-04-17, 08:17 PM   #12
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Cool, thanks for the info.

On another note, an Amazon reviewer made a really good point:

"I'm going to buy a set for my regular bike as well since it will discourage a thief from stealing it if it doesn't have pedals for getting away with it. "
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Old 11-04-17, 09:45 PM   #13
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Can anyone explain how the quick-release works on the MKS pedals?
Is it like a hose quick-release? (push to lock, and pull to release)
The "standard" MKS EZY work like a hose quick-release: pulling back on the collar allows 4 small balls to retract into the housing, allowing the pedal shaft to be removed. A spring returns the collar to its original position.

There were reports of the pedals spontaneously disconnecting. MKS furnishes a pair of plastic "C" clips with the pedals which, if placed properly, prevent the collars from being pulled back inadvertently. It was never clear how the pedals released themselves... I suspect the rider's foot somehow managed to retract the collar. I have never (as in "not once") had this problem in over 20,000 miles with these pedals without using the "C" clips.

There must have been something to it, though, because MKS subsequently came out with the "EZY Superior" line, which have a pull-and-twist collar mechanism. Now I see there is a new "Always Superior" line (see Thor's site: Pedals and Shocks).

More than you wanted to know, maybe...
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Old 11-05-17, 11:51 AM   #14
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I don't ride clipless, but thanks for the tip. In this case it was pretty clearly the pedal. While I never went so far as to put a different pedal on, I did remove the pedal, squeeze some grease into into it, and put it back on. No more squeak. The fact that there were cracks where the spindle met the pedal body big enough for me to get grease in and onto the bearings tells me that it's very likely that the pedals are prone to letting water in there.



I might consider a pedal that can be removed with an allen key, but i would prefer a tool-less system. When I ride my folding bike, it's often because I am anticipating needing to fold it up at some point, so while I wouldn't be taking the pedals off every day, I might be taking them off most of the times I rode that bike.
Actually a lot of high end platform pedals can be installed and removed with an Allen wrench. Also a lot of Clipless can be also---The A530 I use are can be installed/ removed with a 6mm allen...

I sell a lot of stuff on ebay--zbikenut-- all my pedal listings show if the pedal will work with an allen wrench or not---grin---

http://stores.ebay.com/Zbikenut-Bicy...sub=3022901018

Like these big platform pedals that are awesome for tennis shoes/street shoes.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Redline-Lo-...-/222573141932

Last edited by Rick Imby; 11-05-17 at 11:57 AM.
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Old 11-06-17, 07:28 AM   #15
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I really like the MKS "EZY Promenade" for flat pedal and the "EZY AR-2 Road" will take clips (toe loops). I normally switch over to these when I am making a bike suitcase ready.

Do realize they are not as quick as you need to add and remove a plastic c-clip to be sure they won't fall out while in use. I ride sometimes without the C-Clip but I think its asking for trouble.

I've got new EZy's available if you are interested. Black and Titanium colors on the Promenade. Classic Silver on the AR2. Easy to send.

In Japan there are other MKS detachable pedals also available. I have seen one bike with a "clipless" flipable to "flat", but the pedal itself was quite big in my view.

I recommend MKS for folders. Maybe not what you want for a Century bike but my experience has been good.

Last edited by L Arnold; 11-06-17 at 07:28 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 11-06-17, 09:50 AM   #16
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Do realize they are not as quick as you need to add and remove a plastic c-clip to be sure they won't fall out while in use. I ride sometimes without the C-Clip but I think its asking for trouble.
I've used the AR-2 EZY pedals for over 20,000 miles and have never used the C-clips as they are a PITA for commuting. The pedals have never come off on their own. I speculate that the riders who experienced pedals detaching spontaneously either did not check for proper locking by tugging on the pedal after installation, or (more likely in my view) their foot somehow contacted the release sleeve and rotated enough to disengage the pedal. I think the toe clips may prevent this. Anyway, the problem seems to have been eliminated by the re-design of the latch.
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Old 11-06-17, 10:40 AM   #17
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Do you guys really think it is important to have removeable pedals on your folders? I'm looking at light pedals and the velo orange touring pedals are only 236 grams but they aren't quick release. Other than for packing or to lock up and deter theft, how often do you actually remove the pedals?
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Old 11-06-17, 01:14 PM   #18
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... how often do you actually remove the pedals?
I remove mine twice a day to fold the bike and put it on the train. Luckily, it's only the *right* pedal that needs to be removed. So if you went with the pedal wrench scenario, you're only talking about one pedal. A 15mm cone wrench would be lighter than a standard pedal wrench and would work as well.
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Old 11-06-17, 02:01 PM   #19
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I remove mine twice a day to fold the bike and put it on the train. Luckily, it's only the *right* pedal that needs to be removed. So if you went with the pedal wrench scenario, you're only talking about one pedal. A 15mm cone wrench would be lighter than a standard pedal wrench and would work as well.
Steve
I think the velo orange pedals use a hex key so lighter still =). Thanks.
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Old 11-06-17, 02:52 PM   #20
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I use my folders for utility rides; commuting, shopping, travelling, etc.
I find being able to remove one pedal to make the bike more compact
is always helpful.
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Anybody have experience with ACE Titanium Lightweight Quick Release Pedals?
Both sides non removable; 126 gms.
One side removable; 144 gms.
Both sides removable; 178 gms.

Design seems to be a copy of MKS' Compakt model.
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Old 11-06-17, 03:41 PM   #21
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Anybody have experience with ACE Titanium Lightweight Quick Release Pedals?
ACE Titanium Lightweight Quick Release Pedals for Brompton Bicycle mks dahon | eBay
Both sides non removable; 126 gms.
One side removable; 144 gms.
Both sides removable; 178 gms.

Design seems to be a copy of MKS' Compakt model.
I got a pair of those on my Brompton. I can't recommend them:

1. Too small unless you have petite ballerina feet
2. Inboard bearing is a sleeve bearing. On my left one, one one shortish ride after using it for perhaps a month, the pedal started binding halfway through the ride. I managed to get home; I think it rotated the spindle inside the MKS style removable bit. I got it apart easily enough; the sleeve bearing is some sort of hard plastic-like material and it had bound to the Ti axle. The axle showed some damage. I cleaned that as well as I could using a scouring pad. The bearing itself I cleaned and smoothed by carefully twisting a 10mm drill bit in it. Grease, back together and so far it is holding. But I would not trust this thing going on a tour or something.

Despite that I still use them.

In case you're wondering, I have them screwed into that insanely light but cheap crankset that is popping up all over these days in black or silver. Can't recommend that either. Not stiff enough, and Q-factor too small. I discovered it IS possible to have your feet too close together on a bike.
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Old 11-06-17, 05:01 PM   #22
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Thanks for the useful info.
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Old 11-06-17, 05:13 PM   #23
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I think the velo orange pedals use a hex key so lighter still =). Thanks.
Good point! But you can defend yourself with a cone wrench!
Steve
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Old 11-06-17, 06:08 PM   #24
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Good point! But you can defend yourself with a cone wrench!
Steve
You're really funny!!!
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Old 11-07-17, 07:59 AM   #25
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Its a challenge. Folding pedals are easy and heavy and still more bulky than removeable pedals.

Removable pedals can get misplaced and are slower to remove than a folding pedal can be folded.

Basically I find that a dedicated pouch on your bike, like a seat bag, can make it so you don't misplace your pedals somehow. Just throwing them in your bag is not enough.

I decided I will make a "pull" line for my C-clips on my MKS pedals. should make it easier to remove. In reference to the one statement above that you don't need them... yes and no. I went a year without needing the C-Clips, or using them, but then I did loose a pedal one day. All was ok, but pretty disconcerting.

We need a Inflatable pedal that comes and goes automagically.

Last edited by L Arnold; 11-07-17 at 07:59 AM. Reason: clarification
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