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ergonomic saddle for folder

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ergonomic saddle for folder

Old 03-21-11, 10:51 AM
  #51  
kamtsa
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Leather Brooks saddles are 100 years old, and the riders had 5 + generations of children even with riding them.'
It's not about making children. It's about enjoying making them.
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Old 03-21-11, 08:01 PM
  #52  
Sangetsu
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I have used many saddles on many bikes over the years, and though saddle choice is important, proper fitting and position are equally so. If weight is properly distributed between your hands and your backside, and the saddle is properly positioned, most saddles will be comfortable.

Remember that it takes time to break in your saddle and your backside, and 30 minutes is not enough time. You would need a week at least to see how well a particular saddle works with you.

Years ago when I was into racing, I was fitted when I ordered a custom Gios frame and components. I translate these measurements to every bike I have, even my folder. Being properly fitted makes you more comfortable, as well as more efficient. You need the proper saddle height, fore-aft position, tilt, and distance to the handlebar. Bar type and width are also important, on very long rides your hands will probably be more uncomfortable than your backside.

You can get properly fitted at better bike shops. Keep a copy of the measurements, you can use them on other bikes later on.

For what it's worth, I use a Brooks B17. It takes time to break in a Brooks, but eventually it molds itself to your contours and becomes quite comfortable. I don't bother with buying "Proofhide" nonsense, simple sweat works much better. Carry a plastic grocery bag in you pocket, or wad one up and shove it under the seat above the seat post, you can use it to cover the seat when it rains.
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Old 03-22-11, 03:34 AM
  #53  
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Originally Posted by Sangetsu View Post
I don't bother with buying "Proofhide" nonsense, simple sweat works much better. Carry a plastic grocery bag in you pocket, or wad one up and shove it under the seat above the seat post, you can use it to cover the seat when it rains.
I worked in leather for many years, the very best way to 'break-in' any new leather saddle, shoe etc. is to soak it then use it until it dries (cover the saddle with a plastic bag if you don't want a wet bum! But uncovered it will mold & dry much quicker) Soldiers used to either fill their new boots with water or piss in them, leave them overnight, then wear them until they are dry. I think that Proofhide, Hide Food, Neatsfoot Oil etc will help to extend the life of your saddle, I oil my Long-John's Brookes B33 3-4 times a year, it helps to stop the leather from cracking, I'm sure that the salt content in sweat is not beneficial to leather.
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Old 03-22-11, 10:16 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by Chop! View Post
I worked in leather for many years, the very best way to 'break-in' any new leather saddle, shoe etc. is to soak it then use it until it dries (cover the saddle with a plastic bag if you don't want a wet bum! But uncovered it will mold & dry much quicker) Soldiers used to either fill their new boots with water or piss in them, leave them overnight, then wear them until they are dry. I think that Proofhide, Hide Food, Neatsfoot Oil etc will help to extend the life of your saddle, I oil my Long-John's Brookes B33 3-4 times a year, it helps to stop the leather from cracking, I'm sure that the salt content in sweat is not beneficial to leather.
I use glycerine (saddle soap) for occasional cleaning, softening the leather too much with neatsfoot oil can lead to it stretching prematurely. Sweat contains no chemicals which are foreign to leather (which is simply processed animal skin), and in my experience cause it no harm. I used to get 2 years out of a saddle before wearing it out, but I rode a lot of miles over those 2 years.

At one time I was an Arm medic working in an Airborne Infantry unit. Boots break in quite quickly without additional work. After a single road march a soldier's boots tend to get soaked through with sweat, and you can see the white salt accumulate on outside of the boots as sweat dries. In my grandfather's day boots were often soaked to help break them in, which was necessary given the lack of half-sizes available at the time. Even boots which were the "correct" size often didn't fit well. Thankfully modern technology has allowed for better boots.

A wider saddle is not necessarily more comfortable than a narrow saddle, unless you are an infrequent rider. On long rides (on a broken-in saddle with a broken-in backside), a narrow saddle allows more circulation and less chafing.

Also keep in mind that a good pair of shorts is equally important to comfort as a good saddle. Not everyone has a backside of iron, so good shorts are a necessity.
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Old 03-22-11, 11:43 PM
  #55  
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seems to go on and on, its not the thinking head end and the words
on a keyboard that you have to sit on..
and folding bikes are no different than other bikes .. your ass sits on a saddle
If it's not s satisfactory perch, you look for another one
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Old 05-22-12, 12:14 AM
  #56  
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Hi - I have been reading through this post as normal saddles tend to greatly irritate my lower regions so I'm looking for a replacement "no-horn" saddle type. To that end I wonder if any of you here know of a (in-depth) review of the various no-horn - or short horn (are they called this? ;-) ) - saddles?

Best regards,

Jesper
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Old 05-22-12, 12:40 AM
  #57  
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Originally Posted by irpheus View Post
Hi - I have been reading through this post as normal saddles tend to greatly irritate my lower regions so I'm looking for a replacement "no-horn" saddle type. To that end I wonder if any of you here know of a (in-depth) review of the various no-horn - or short horn (are they called this? ;-) ) - saddles?
I don't know of any in-depth reviews off the top of my head, but I highly recommend the ISM "Adamo" line of saddles because they're wide enough to be ridden as "no-horn", but also narrow enough to be ridden like a regular "horned" saddle.

You see, the problem (in my experience) with most "no-horn" saddles is that it's impossible to use your thighs to help control and balance the bike, but the Adamo saddles give the best of both worlds depending on how far forward or backward you place your butt on the saddle: control when you need it and safe ergonomics (including proper blood flow, etc in addition to comfort) when you don't.


Sorry if this sounds like an advertisement, but I use these saddles on all my bikes and, frankly, I don't want to see them discontinued in case I ever need replacements because, as much as I love these saddles, I doubt the 3-4 saddles I'll buy in my lifetime are going to keep the manufacturer in business:
https://www.ismseat.com/

Last edited by chucky; 05-22-12 at 12:45 AM.
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Old 05-22-12, 07:29 AM
  #58  
BassNotBass
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It's good to read various points of view and the results of studies but they mean very little when the fact is that my Brooks saddles are the most comfortable ones I've ridden with no ill effects. I hope everyone here finds their favorite.
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Old 05-23-12, 09:03 AM
  #59  
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Hi both,

First greetings from a very summerly Denmark After a longer and colder than normal spring summerly temperatures and weather have now arrived ... Great!

About the saddles I know that it's very individual which saddles fit me/others. I've just owned like many (including two Brooks saddles) and never really felt comfortable with any of them so in searching for a review of the no-horn saddles I hope to get an overview - and maybe a short-list - of which saddles to consider.

Saddles are not easily tried out here in Denmark and personally I find it to be too expensive to buy saddle(s) that I may end up not using.

Best regards,

Jesper
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