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Mounted pump recommendations?

Old 07-11-15, 07:42 AM
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Mounted pump recommendations?

I am looking to replace my Topeak morph pump that I carry on my road bike. It is very difficult to get a tire pumped beyond about 90 psi. Can anyone recommend a good and reliable mounted pump that can pump a road tire to up to 120 psi?
Thanks
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Old 07-11-15, 08:27 AM
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I love my Zefel, Rivendell & Niagra Cycles in NY both still sell the HP-X Frame Pump.

https://www.rivbike.com/v/vspfiles/photos/pu2-2.jpg

BTW the darn things last, so they are not expensive.
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Old 07-11-15, 08:31 AM
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I'm not going to be very helpful. Seems to me a pump is a rescue tool to get you home. 90 psi gets you home. I do like the Lezyne pumps. I doubt if I could get a tire to even 90 psi with a frame pump though. Mostly cause I'm 70 and don't have the strength I used to.
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Old 07-11-15, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by RISKDR1
I'm not going to be very helpful. Seems to me a pump is a rescue tool to get you home. 90 psi gets you home. I do like the Lezyne pumps. I doubt if I could get a tire to even 90 psi with a frame pump though. Mostly cause I'm 70 and don't have the strength I used to.
+1 on Lezyne pumps. 120 psi takes some arm/hand strength-- theoretically achievable, but in practice I don't carry a pressure gauge with me on the bike, so basically I pump until squeezing the tire gives me the same feel as the other tire which didn't flat.
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Old 07-11-15, 08:53 AM
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Lezyne for me, too.
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Old 07-11-15, 10:27 AM
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Lezyne Road Drive, the longest one. It's rated for 160 psi, but that's more than double what I'd need for my 35s—Another plus for fatter tires The Road Drive isn't a frame pump per se, but it comes with a beautifully-machined mount that holds it rock solid next to and under a bottle cage or frame-mounted tool pouch. The flex hose can be replaced with one that has an inline pressure gauge. I want the carbon fiber version, but it's way too much for something I'd rarely use.
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Old 07-11-15, 10:42 AM
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Originally Posted by ddeand
Lezyne for me, too.
Another one for Lezyne here. Had an issue with my pump last week, contacted the customer service number and received incredible customer service from the warranty guy that I spoke with. They were out of stock on the color that I wanted, he is making sure that I do not ride without a pump till the color that I want becomes available again soon. Seems like caring customer service is getting tougher and tougher to find these days.
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Old 07-11-15, 12:12 PM
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The laws of physics can't be violated no matter who makes the pump.

The factor that determines how hard you have to work to pump to 120 psi is barrel diameter. A skinnier barrel will be easier to pump but will take more pumps to reach the same pressure. Those short, compact mini pumps will get you up to operating pressure but might take so many pumps that a fellow my age might not have enough time left to ever get there.

I think that for pure function your Topeak Morph pump is pretty hard to beat. It works like a mini floor pump so you can get your torso into the pumping action and it has a hose so you're less likely to tear off your valve stem in the process. Kind'a clunky looking though.
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Old 07-11-15, 03:05 PM
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+1. ^^^
Agree with Retro Grouch's above post.

O.P.,
You probably have the wrong version of the 'Topeak Morph Pump'. Having problems reaching 90 psi would indicate to me that you have the model aimed towards Low Pressure tires. Purchasing a Topeak Road Morph 'G' should solve your problem.
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Old 07-11-15, 04:05 PM
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What size Lezyne Road Drive is the best? Medium or large?
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Old 07-11-15, 04:30 PM
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Over the years I have developed what I call the "Charleston" method for pumping with a small pump. I place my hands art both ends, crouch and place my knees outside my hands and squeeze my legs along with my arms to get more power to the pump. None of my pumps has an end mounted hose, though. At some point I think I may try a compact pump with a toe or toe holds, though.
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Old 07-11-15, 04:36 PM
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I use the Lezyne micro-floor drive. It has fold-out "legs" to let you use it the same way you would a floor pump, which allows a whole lot more leverage than a typical hand pump. It is still compact and light enough to use as a frame pump.
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Old 07-12-15, 09:40 AM
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I use Topeak Road Morph and it acts like a floor pump. There should be no arm or hand strain because a floor pump is mostly leg strength. If you are using arms and hands as the main thing, then you're doing it wrong.
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Old 07-12-15, 12:07 PM
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Originally Posted by RISKDR1
I'm not going to be very helpful. Seems to me a pump is a rescue tool to get you home. 90 psi gets you home. I do like the Lezyne pumps. I doubt if I could get a tire to even 90 psi with a frame pump though. Mostly cause I'm 70 and don't have the strength I used to.
Agreed, very difficult with most frame pumps to get up to recommended psi. A decent floor pump is a good investment. Even after only 3 days or so the pressure is back down by 20 psi or so on my commuter. The difference in speed, making lights, saved time, etc. is pretty astounding. Makes me wonder about folks touring. Not having tires at the max psi must represent many lost miles over a long haul.
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Old 07-12-15, 12:19 PM
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I used a Blackburn frame fit to keep my 622-40 touring tires topped up to 6bar.

120psi is not going to be easy no matter what pump you buy ..

Bruce Gordon's hand Made Titanium frame fit is made in the manner of the original Silca Impero

Silca's new Owner has pushed the retail cost envelope of their new version Up past $150

Impero Ultimate Frame Pump | SILCA .. but it is a Life time purchase and premium stuff.
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Old 07-12-15, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by RISKDR1
I'm not going to be very helpful. Seems to me a pump is a rescue tool to get you home. 90 psi gets you home. I do like the Lezyne pumps. I doubt if I could get a tire to even 90 psi with a frame pump though. Mostly cause I'm 70 and don't have the strength I used to.
I think that's the way to look at it. I personally have this inexpensive BV model. Barring high pressures, its actually pretty good...but when I was running 110 PSI tires, I wasn't able to get anywhere near that...it was a workout just to get to 90.

I only use it on the road for emergencies or if I notice my kid's tires need topped off, but that's it. By the way, its got a little metal tab that folds out (presumably to steady the pump with your foot and use as a floor pump) but in practice it doesn't provide enough support for the forces involved when pumping to nearly 100psi. My only other complaint is that if you plan to use it to alternate between Presta and Shrader tubes, its a little tedious to switch over the valve.
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Old 07-13-15, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by camasa45
What size Lezyne Road Drive is the best? Medium or large?
I have both. If you want to go over 90 psi, you'll want the large.
--
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Old 07-13-15, 12:31 PM
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I flatted this weekend and used my medium Lezyne Road Drive for the first time. I had to work hard get my tire inflated to 80 PSI. For me weighing 150 lbs that was fine and I was
able to complete my ride. Other mounted pumps I've had in he past I was lucky if I got up to 60 PSI so I'm pleased with the performance of the Lezyne pump.

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Old 07-14-15, 05:09 PM
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Originally Posted by BobbyG
Over the years I have developed what I call the "Charleston" method for pumping with a small pump. I place my hands art both ends, crouch and place my knees outside my hands and squeeze my legs along with my arms to get more power to the pump. None of my pumps has an end mounted hose, though. At some point I think I may try a compact pump with a toe or toe holds, though.
Like a thigh master?
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Old 07-14-15, 10:32 PM
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Yup!
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