Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Is a cyclocross a good fit for my needs?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Is a cyclocross a good fit for my needs?

Old 09-23-15, 02:24 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Is a cyclocross a good fit for my needs?

Looking at picking up a new bike and wondering if I'm on the right track.

Right now I have a hybrid and a 29er. Looking to replace the hybrid with something a bit more road specific and either get rid of the hybrid or turn it into a winter bike.

I live near a local park and get out daily on 8-10 mile rides. Once a week I'll get out for 40-50 miles and once or twice a month I'll get out for 100+ mile rides.

Usually once a month my wife and I will do camping trips which are usually 3-4 days long doing approx 50-70 miles per day.

I also use my bike for most local errands where I don't have to carry anything too big. Looking to start commuting with my bike as well (13 miles each way)

I like the idea of a road bike, but would like the idea of something a little tougher as I like the ability to take shortcuts across the grass or hop curbs. Some of my local trails are gravel as well. Also a lot of the road bikes I looked at won't accept a rack for camping trips.

Looked at touring bikes, but thought that may be overkill for us only doing multi day trips once per month tops.

Thinking a cyclocross bike like the Trek Cross rip LTD would be a good fit for me. Took a test ride and liked it other than the reach was a bit longer than I would like (Easy fix with a shorter stem??)

Rode a trek Crocket and absolutely loved it and thought the fit was perfect, but it won't accept a rack for multi day trips.

So am I on the right track with the Cross rip LTD?


CrossRip LTD - Trek Bicycle
mnsam is offline  
Old 09-23-15, 02:28 PM
  #2  
Life is good
 
RonH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Not far from the Withlacoochee Trail. 🚴🏻
Posts: 18,208

Bikes: 2018 Lynskey Helix Pro

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 522 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 10 Posts
When I was a bike commuter I rode a CX bike. Great for hauling stuff, rugged and can accommodate racks, fenders, etc.
__________________
The Lord is merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love. - Psalm 103:8

I am a cyclist. I am not the fastest or the fittest. But I will get to where I'm going with a smile on my face.
RonH is offline  
Old 09-23-15, 03:28 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
alcjphil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 6,050
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1884 Post(s)
Liked 1,758 Times in 1,020 Posts
Honestly, My touring bike is far and away the most versatile bike I own. I have ridden it off road in the snow, using cyclocross tires and was able to keep up with others on dual suspension mountain bikes. I ride it often in the spring when the roads here are frost heaved and potholes are plentiful. My mudguards ensure that I am not drenched by dirty water on the roads. A touring bike will match any cyclocross bike on the road and will almost always be better at carrying a load. Cyclocross bikes that are good as commuters are usually touring bikes in disguise. Touring bikes have fallen out of fashion, doesn't mean that they are not viable for your needs
alcjphil is offline  
Old 09-23-15, 04:27 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 5,997

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 2007 Dahon Boardwalk, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International, 2006 Felt F65, 1989 Dahon Getaway V

Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1369 Post(s)
Liked 1,699 Times in 837 Posts
It comes down to taste. I mostly commute and this year I bought a Charge Plug from Performance Bicycles. It was a special package for Performance and kinda slots between the Plug 3 and plug 4. I call it a semi-tourer because it's a longer wheelbase than my roadbike, but not quite as long as an LHT or Vaya. It's also a little lighter than a typical steel touring bike, but still steel. My wish was for a steel frame with a longer wheelbase and relaxed geometry for more self-steering, more stability, and less twitchyness than my road bike or my MTB-based commuter. Mission accomplished! However, I still like to occasionally ride on the roadbike when its dry because it's nimble. And the MTB-based commuter is more solid and is more adept at curbs, potholes and unpaved loose stuff, but still quicker to maneuver due to its quick steering. You can almost always add racks and fenders to bikes not designed for them, so it comes down to taste. A traditional touring bike will be more comfortable and less twitchy than a road bike while a cross or gravel bike may be just as sturdy as a tourer, but lighter, more responsive and most likely more sporty.
BobbyG is offline  
Old 09-23-15, 04:39 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,556

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 179 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5937 Post(s)
Liked 3,642 Times in 2,155 Posts
Either a touring bike or a cross bike is a great choice. Personally I'd opt for the cross bike as it will be a bit better for most of the riding you do. Keep the hybrid for touring and/or winter commuting.
bikemig is online now  
Old 09-23-15, 05:24 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 791

Bikes: Many bikes in three states and two countries, mainly riding Moots Vamoots, Lynskey R265 disc and a Spot Denver Zephyr nowadays

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mnsam
Looking at picking up a new bike and wondering if I'm on the right track.

Right now I have a hybrid and a 29er. Looking to replace the hybrid with something a bit more road specific and either get rid of the hybrid or turn it into a winter bike.

I live near a local park and get out daily on 8-10 mile rides. Once a week I'll get out for 40-50 miles and once or twice a month I'll get out for 100+ mile rides.

Usually once a month my wife and I will do camping trips which are usually 3-4 days long doing approx 50-70 miles per day.

I also use my bike for most local errands where I don't have to carry anything too big. Looking to start commuting with my bike as well (13 miles each way)

I like the idea of a road bike, but would like the idea of something a little tougher as I like the ability to take shortcuts across the grass or hop curbs. Some of my local trails are gravel as well. Also a lot of the road bikes I looked at won't accept a rack for camping trips.

Looked at touring bikes, but thought that may be overkill for us only doing multi day trips once per month tops.

Thinking a cyclocross bike like the Trek Cross rip LTD would be a good fit for me. Took a test ride and liked it other than the reach was a bit longer than I would like (Easy fix with a shorter stem??)

Rode a trek Crocket and absolutely loved it and thought the fit was perfect, but it won't accept a rack for multi day trips.

So am I on the right track with the Cross rip LTD?


CrossRip LTD - Trek Bicycle
The CrossRip is not a cyclocross model, though, it is listed by Trek as a fitness bike, meaning an all around road bike.

Cyclocross bikes are often geared quite a bit more narrowly than your standard road bike, commonly 46/36 because the steepest hills in cyclocross you are supposed to carry the bike up.

So the CrossRip may be a perfect fit for you, but not because it's a cyclocross bike, because it's not... the Crockett is though.

The only bad thing I've heard on the CrossRip models is they are a little pricey for the level of componentry they have.
ShortLegCyclist is offline  
Old 09-23-15, 05:44 PM
  #7  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 17

Bikes: 2016 Felt F65X 2013 Speciaized Tarmac Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Check out 2016 Felt f65x just purchased one, great bike, reasonably priced
Rgl3 is offline  
Old 09-24-15, 02:33 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,039
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 75 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Take a look at the Cannondale CAADX, too. I really like mine. It has mounts for a rack and fenders.
Pendergast is offline  
Old 09-24-15, 08:33 AM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
GovernorSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Posts: 1,218

Bikes: Breezer Uptown 8, Jamis Renegade Expert

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Some companies like Jamis and Felt now offer a newer type of road bike called "adventure road". Not quite specific for cyclocross competition, but designed for all-day riding, with clearance for wider tires. Might want to check out those bikes.

Jamis makes the Renegade series, which they just moved out of the "road" category into the "adventure" category on their website.

Felt makes the V- series (eg. V85).
GovernorSilver is offline  
Old 09-24-15, 10:23 AM
  #10  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanks! I'll check those out. Was thinking of buying in the next few days, but now looks like I have more test rides to do

LBS called the cross rip a cyclocross, but looking at the choice of tires and gearing it's pretty obvious it's not. If I went the route of the cross rip, would it be tough enough for easy to intermediate single track? I have my 29er for single track, but would be to have a different bike to take out on easier to intermediate stuff every now and then for a new challenge.
mnsam is offline  
Old 09-24-15, 10:34 AM
  #11  
Señor Member
 
Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,066
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 649 Post(s)
Liked 294 Times in 217 Posts
The only drawback I see with CX bikes is if you are doing heavily loaded touring in a mountainous area, the stock gearing might be a bit too tall.
Wilfred Laurier is offline  
Old 09-24-15, 11:46 AM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
ColaJacket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1,892

Bikes: Fuji Sportif 1.3 C - 2014

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd look at a Gravel Grinder bike, rather than a cyclocross bike (but there may be a little cross-breeding between the two). Do a google search on "gravel grinder bike review".

Here's a good article that lists a few of what they consider to be the best of this line: Buyer's Guide to Adventure and Gravel bikes. These are the type of bikes recommended by GS above.

Here's a specific review on the Specialized Diverge. I'm sure that a lot of aspects of this bike are also true of other Adventure and Gravel bikes.

GH
ColaJacket is offline  
Old 09-24-15, 11:54 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 791

Bikes: Many bikes in three states and two countries, mainly riding Moots Vamoots, Lynskey R265 disc and a Spot Denver Zephyr nowadays

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mnsam
Thanks! I'll check those out. Was thinking of buying in the next few days, but now looks like I have more test rides to do

LBS called the cross rip a cyclocross, but looking at the choice of tires and gearing it's pretty obvious it's not. If I went the route of the cross rip, would it be tough enough for easy to intermediate single track? I have my 29er for single track, but would be to have a different bike to take out on easier to intermediate stuff every now and then for a new challenge.
Yeah, ColaJacket is right on, if you want to do intermediate single track, a gravel bike is the way to go rather than a Trek CrossRip.

A new breed of bikes built for 'gravel grinders' - LA Times
ShortLegCyclist is offline  
Old 09-24-15, 07:06 PM
  #14  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I had recently been searching for a versatile, multi-purpose bike as well. The variety of uses you described are very similar to mine. I ended up buying a Salsa Vaya II. So far (after a few hundred miles) I like it a lot.
mudheadkt is offline  
Old 09-25-15, 11:21 AM
  #15  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,360 Times in 866 Posts
Categories get fuzzy on the edges Hybrid with drop Bars without suspension falls in there .

Full competition Cyclocross Bikes will have No Need for Water-bottles Racks and mudguards

So have No provision to fit any .. the race is only an Hour long at most, and does repeated laps around a course.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 09-25-15, 12:03 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 968
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 113 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
A touring bike is probably going to weigh a little more than a cx bike.
09box is offline  
Old 09-25-15, 03:47 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 290
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd go for a touring bike. A cyclocross just feels a bit heavy and bulky in comparison. I bought a cyclo cross 4 years ago. It has sentimntal value to me, otherwise I would buy a touring tomorrow.
mozad655 is offline  
Old 09-28-15, 10:03 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
 
valleyrider's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Shenandoah Valley
Posts: 78

Bikes: 2014 Trek Crossrip Elite, *mart Mongoose XR-150

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've used my Crossrip on a fair number of singletrack. I have also used in in CX races, and I use it for my daily commute (16 miles). I have also done a few half-century gravel rides (not fit enough for the century yet) with it, including lots of mountains. It is very versatile. However, I would agree with the price vs. components argument. I bought mine half off from a guy on Craigslist, but knowing what I know now I don't think I would've have paid full price for it, but I am also really cheap (I have the Elite with SORA drivetrain). I think the Crossrip would be absolutely perfect for you, if you don't mind the price tag. You can always change the tires and put a shorter stem on (that's what I did). That style of bike is great. I also have some 28c tires for my road rides, and it soars.
valleyrider is offline  
Old 09-28-15, 10:17 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
TenGrainBread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 2,707
Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1137 Post(s)
Liked 659 Times in 341 Posts
I would look at the Kona Sutra, speaking from personal experience. Touring bike with all the goodies (gearing for climbing, braze-ons galore, and big tires/fenders/rear rack/Brooks come stock), but it's essentially the same geometry as their CX model (Rove). I have one now and use it for everything (commuting, bit of off-road, touring, fast rides).
TenGrainBread is offline  
Old 09-28-15, 10:58 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 62

Bikes: Gary Fisher Mamba (circa 1995 or so), 2012 KHS CX300

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I got a KHS CX300 cyclocross bike for riding in town and on some relatively smooth trails. It doesn't have provisions for a rear rack, but that was easy enough to solve--Bontrager makes a rear rack that uses a long skewer to mount the bottom end--the BackRack Lightweight--and all you need to do to mount the top end of the rack is get a seat post clamp with bolt eyelets--Bontrager makes one too, as does other parts manufacturers.
echale3 is offline  
Old 09-28-15, 12:26 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Posts: 27,549
Mentioned: 217 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18463 Post(s)
Liked 4,568 Times in 3,393 Posts
I'm surprised that the Crocket doesn't have the eyelets.

I've mounted a rack on my old Colnago years ago. It has Campy style rear dropouts which take a Blackburn adapter, and then P-Clips at the top, and the rack is as secure as any rack with eyelets (except for the slight angle in the fit, which I may fix sometime).

Anyway, if I was buying a new bike, then I'd get one with the eyelets. However, I wouldn't stress over it if I found a good used bike that was short the eyelets.
CliffordK is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
The 585
Commuting
37
08-19-17 03:17 PM
sgtrobo
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
26
08-29-14 10:27 AM
TelemarkCO
Commuting
16
08-01-14 11:19 PM
siggy2xc
Touring
25
01-29-12 06:41 PM
alphasigmookie
Commuting
34
08-14-10 10:55 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.