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An angled stem

Old 06-17-16, 10:32 AM
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An angled stem

I want to raise my handle bars up just a bit maybe an inch tops. My own calculations indicate that I can achieve this goal with a 17-20 degree stem. While in a LBS discussing a fit the tech says to me if your putting on an angled stem of 20-30 degrees it means "your own the wrong bike". I just wanted to reach out to the forum for any opinions. Is it somehow "wrong" to use angled stems to get you to a position of comfort?
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Old 06-17-16, 10:35 AM
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It depends. What is on the bike right now? And how did you come up with this calculation?
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Old 06-17-16, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by TKJava
I want to raise my handle bars up just a bit maybe an inch tops. My own calculations indicate that I can achieve this goal with a 17-20 degree stem. While in a LBS discussing a fit the tech says to me if your putting on an angled stem of 20-30 degrees it means "your own the wrong bike". I just wanted to reach out to the forum for any opinions. Is it somehow "wrong" to use angled stems to get you to a position of comfort?
It will work fine, look less traditional, and mean spending less money at your LBS.
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Old 06-17-16, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by TenSpeedV2
It depends. What is on the bike right now? And how did you come up with this calculation?
This.

OP, a 90mm 17* stem on a 52cm bike with the stem slammed to the headset....and a 130mm 17* stem on a 52cm bike with 5" of spacers underneath it are two different things. There's also your own fitness.
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Old 06-17-16, 10:50 AM
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There's a 110mm 7 degree stem on the bike now I have it angled up. It's a "62cm" endurance bike. I used Visio and did a to scale drawing, laying out a 110mm 7 degree line and putting a 17 and 20 degree line intersecting at the base of the original. You can measure the rise and change in reach this way. A 110 mm 17 degree goes up about .8" and gets about .2" closer to you in reach. 20 degrees is right at the 1" mark. If I use a 120mm angled stem it actually can be just a bit further away in reach and even higher than the 110.
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Old 06-17-16, 11:07 AM
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Originally Posted by TKJava
Is it somehow "wrong" to use angled stems to get you to a position of comfort?
It's not wrong at all. Some might think it's "wrong" to take a racing style bike and make it more comfortable, less competitive, but I don't.
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Old 06-17-16, 11:13 AM
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This is pretty useful when trying to see what changes in stem or spacer height does: Stem Comparison Tool | yojimg.net


If a stem angled that much to get you the position you want is what's needed, I wouldn't say using it is wrong, but the bike tech is right in the sense that a bike with different geometry probably would have been a better starting point.
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Old 06-17-16, 12:38 PM
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FWIW, there are adjustable stems. They are kinda heavy, but this might be what you need.
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Old 06-17-16, 02:13 PM
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Originally Posted by tyrion
Some might think it's "wrong" to take a racing style bike and make it more comfortable, less competitive, but I don't.
+1
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Old 06-17-16, 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Pendergast
If a stem angled that much to get you the position you want is what's needed, I wouldn't say using it is wrong, but the bike tech is right in the sense that a bike with different geometry probably would have been a better starting point.
Possibly, but the same bike with a taller head tube to raise the handlebar will probably also have a longer top tube to move the handlebar farther forward. Stand over height might be affected too.

The real question is: What should the OP do now? My answer would be to install the angled stem, position the handlebars so they suit you, and to ignore the scoffers.
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Old 06-17-16, 03:06 PM
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I dont care what you do to your bike , 'right' or 'wrong', because its not My Bike.. Suit Your self.

73 degree head tube? a threadless, 17 degree stem looks level, to the horizon, but it looks up angled just by flipping it over ..
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Old 06-17-16, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by TKJava
I want to raise my handle bars up just a bit maybe an inch tops. My own calculations indicate that I can achieve this goal with a 17-20 degree stem. While in a LBS discussing a fit the tech says to me if your putting on an angled stem of 20-30 degrees it means "your own the wrong bike". I just wanted to reach out to the forum for any opinions. Is it somehow "wrong" to use angled stems to get you to a position of comfort?
No, it's not wrong. And it doesn't necessarily mean you're on the wrong bike. I routinely these days raise and shorten the stem to suit my, aging, preference for a more upright riding style without sacrificing the frame size and geometry I prefer.
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Old 06-18-16, 07:02 AM
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Stems are inexpensive. Swap away and experiment to see what works best for you.

Originally Posted by tyrion
It's not wrong at all. Some might think it's "wrong" to take a racing style bike and make it more comfortable, less competitive, but I don't.
If one is that uncomfortable with low bars, raising them could make the cyclist more competitive... if that's a concern.
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Old 06-18-16, 11:42 AM
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Do what you like. I've personally modified dozens of race bikes into upright hybrid fitness bikes. Toss the old stem & try something new. Don't let the bike snobs get you down.
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Old 06-18-16, 12:33 PM
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There's nothing wrong with an angled stem. I never understood the obsession with a flat and slammed stem. Too many people like to pretend they're in the pro peloton I suppose. You should just go with whatever is most comfortable IMO.

Get the rear-end of your bike perfected before touching the front though (saddle position relative to the cranks). Then it's a fine balance between stem length/stem angle/spacer height. Best of luck.
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Old 06-22-16, 08:56 AM
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Thanks much and for all the opinions here
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