Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Effects of headwind exponential in cold air?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Effects of headwind exponential in cold air?

Old 11-13-16, 11:45 PM
  #1  
Dreww10
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 318
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 167 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Effects of headwind exponential in cold air?

I think most cyclists are aware of how the air density in cold temperatures effects aerodynamics and in turn their speed for a given effort, but what I haven't seen is discussion of whether this causes the wind to have a multiplied effect on a rider. I've often felt that below 60 degrees F or thereabouts, a given wind speed becomes noticeably more difficult to ride into, independent of the diminished speed already caused by the increased air density. For example, when it's in the 30's, an 8-10 mph headwind seems to have the slowing effect of a 20 mph wind in the summer, but still has the normal effect of a 10 mph wind when at your back and your side.
Dreww10 is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 12:46 AM
  #2  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 9,275

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 102 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2718 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1,183 Times in 810 Posts
You've got me interested. I see two different (but not entirely unrelated) factors. Air density which plays directly into form drag and viscosity which governs skin friction. Now viscosity, speed and object length dictate the characteristics of the flow over an object which can cause big differences in both form drag and skin friction.

Density changes linearly with temperature. I'm guessing viscosity does too but I never thought about it, just looked it up. Viscosity changes could alter the Reynolds number, a dimensionless number that describes fluid flow. The effects of viscosity and its effect on the overall air flow will be the same for any two objects with the same Reynolds number. (You can test both ship's rudders and airplane wings using 10" models in an aquarium sized test area with up to 100 mph water flow through it.)

Might have to pull out my old text books or go online to see if I can see a chart of air viscosity vs temp.

Remember also that your surface area in 30 degrees is a lot higher than it was last summer. All those clothes. Also that wind speed is exactly the same as wind resistance from your speed. All that matters is the "relative wind": ie what a wind indicator on our helmet would read. So going 10 miles per hour into a 20 mph headwind is exactly like ridng at 30 mph in no wind. (Well not really. The road and other objects will be slowing the wind above it down - that same skin friction mentioned above and other factors. There will also be turbulence which either help or hurt you.

Fluid dynamics - the more you know, the more you know you don't know.

Ben
79pmooney is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 01:21 AM
  #3  
markjenn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1,157
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 153 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 9 Posts
Colder air is more dense and aero drag is directly proportional to density. So aero drag increases proportionally with a drop in temperature. But the effect isn't huge - for example, you'll get about 12% more aero drag bicycling at 32-deg (F) than you would at 75-deg. If you're also bicycling into a headwind then a temperature drop will amplify the affect of the headwind - for example, if the the headwind causes X drag at 75, then it will cause 1.12X drag at 32. I don't know if this is the "multiplied effect" you refer to.

- Mark

Last edited by markjenn; 11-14-16 at 01:26 AM.
markjenn is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 03:41 PM
  #4  
Abu Mahendra
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bali
Posts: 2,244

Bikes: In service - FSIR Spin 3.0, Bannard Sunny minivelo, Dahon Dash Altena folder. Several others in construction or temporarily decommissioned.

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 896 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 12 Posts
What effects, if any, does air humidity play in this? Colder air will be drier. Anything here?
Abu Mahendra is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 03:54 PM
  #5  
pdlamb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: northern Deep South
Posts: 6,507

Bikes: Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee

Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1439 Post(s)
Liked 561 Times in 374 Posts
After you've dealt with the physical, fluid dynamics questions (aerodynamic drag), and the effects of clothing (flapping jacket), then you get down to the psychological questions.


How much does your face hurt when you're cycling into a headwind at freezing? How bad do your feet and hands feel? How hard is it to turn the cranks when you've got knee warmers wrapping around cold knees? Are your tires more stiff/less forgiving in cold weather?


It's probably not exponential, except perhaps converging to how you feel with every bit of winter gear you own on as you crank away in the coldest weather you've every cycled in.
pdlamb is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 03:56 PM
  #6  
TKJava
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: North Eastern U.S.
Posts: 131

Bikes: Canyon Endurace, Kestrel RT1000 Ultegra

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 11 Posts
This was an interesting question, this article has an interesting explanation regarding air density and also to some degree cold muscles.
Technical FAQ: Why is riding in the cold so hard? | VeloNews.com
TKJava is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 04:17 PM
  #7  
Champlaincycler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Adirondacks
Posts: 249

Bikes: 2018 Diverge Comp, 2016 Specialized SL4 Comp,

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
You guys are a lot smarter then me. Cold air being denser explains a lot. Now, we've been having an extended season here in northern NY, temps in the 40's by 10 am, rising to low 50's by noon all week. I've been telling my wife that 45-50 degrees feels so much colder in late fall then it does in late April/early May. Don't know why it is but I'm wearing lots more clothing now then I would be in the spring. Sun is lower, leaves and greenery gone is all I can come up with. Is this real, or imaginary?
Champlaincycler is online now  
Old 11-14-16, 04:33 PM
  #8  
Camilo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,838
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 348 Post(s)
Liked 134 Times in 89 Posts
The effects I see at cold temps on my real road bike are.... none of them are earth shattering, but I feel them ad they're significant at least in a practical riding sense, not necessarily an engineering sense.

Wearing more clothes. Like it or not, you will tend to have more friction, binding, resistance from wearing more clothes, even properly fitting, high quality ones.

The wind chill effect - makes you less likely to hammer your speed up going downhill especially, coast more. Also tightens you up in general, even if you're warmed up.

TIRES!!. your tires are harder, less supple. They ride rougher and are therefore less efficient (in mho). They are less comfortable exacerbating the general lessened fun and comfort compared to warm weather cycling. Less comfortable, harsher = less speed, less endurance, less motivation to push it.

I can see the air density issue, but not being an engineer, that factor doesn't really cross my mind. What does cross my mind are the above reasons why, although I ride down to about 20F, I just don't go as fast or feel as fast as when it's above 60F.
Camilo is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 04:41 PM
  #9  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 39,739

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2493 Post(s)
Liked 1,611 Times in 811 Posts
Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
What effects, if any, does air humidity play in this? Colder air will be drier. Anything here?
Not necessarily. Depends on the climate. Here in the Sacramento Valley we have very hot, dry summers. In the fall and winter we get tule fog, which occurs when the damp ground warms up during the day, releasing water vapor into the air. At night, the air cools, the water vapor condenses into a very thick, low lying fog. A typical fall ride could be low 40sF (5-6C) and 100%RH.
caloso is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 04:45 PM
  #10  
wphamilton
Senior Member
 
wphamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Posts: 15,181

Bikes: Nashbar Road

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2870 Post(s)
Liked 262 Times in 175 Posts
not exponential, linear with respect to air density.

Less humid, counter-intuitively is more dense and harder to push through.

Cold air affects me more than the higher density should. I just have a hard time warming up, harder time breathing, and I suspect my circulation isn't as efficient.
wphamilton is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 04:53 PM
  #11  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 39,739

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2493 Post(s)
Liked 1,611 Times in 811 Posts
Here's some anecdata. My training partner and I have a standard out-and-back 2x30' tempo ride we do often. It's on a bike trail that parallels a river so it can be quite cool and damp in the winter. I looked at a ride from February and compared it with a ride in June.

2/9/16
46F
266w avg. power
19.7mph

6/6/16
67F
263w avg. power
21.1mph

So, 21 degrees warmer meant that for the same power, I went 7% or nearly a mile and a half per hour faster.
caloso is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 05:03 PM
  #12  
andr0id
Senior Member
 
andr0id's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,522
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1421 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
not exponential, linear with respect to air density.

Less humid, counter-intuitively is more dense and harder to push through.
Water vapor molecules are spaced farther apart than the mostly N2 O2 components of air.

Also keep in mind when you do any air density, gas law equations, temperature is Kelvin where room temperature is a cozy 293K and freezing is 273K.
andr0id is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 05:46 PM
  #13  
wphamilton
Senior Member
 
wphamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Posts: 15,181

Bikes: Nashbar Road

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2870 Post(s)
Liked 262 Times in 175 Posts
Originally Posted by andr0id View Post
Water vapor molecules are spaced farther apart than the mostly N2 O2 components of air.

Also keep in mind when you do any air density, gas law equations, temperature is Kelvin where room temperature is a cozy 293K and freezing is 273K.
Yep. Converting @caloso to kelvin gets his 19.7 mph to about 20.6 due to air temperature alone. The other .5 mph, maybe atmospheric pressure was different, or perhaps the tires harder at 46° as someone mentioned
wphamilton is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 05:48 PM
  #14  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 39,739

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2493 Post(s)
Liked 1,611 Times in 811 Posts
Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
Yep. Converting @caloso to kelvin gets his 19.7 mph to about 20.6 due to air temperature alone. The other .5 mph, maybe atmospheric pressure was different, or perhaps the tires harder at 46° as someone mentioned
Clothing, probably.
caloso is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 06:26 PM
  #15  
asgelle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 4,142
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 741 Post(s)
Liked 231 Times in 143 Posts
Originally Posted by andr0id View Post
Water vapor molecules are spaced farther apart than the mostly N2 O2 components of air.
Where do you get ideas like this?
asgelle is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 06:31 PM
  #16  
jorglueke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Woodbury, MN
Posts: 431

Bikes: 2006 Trek Pilot 1.2, 1972 Schwinn SS

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by TKJava View Post
This was an interesting question, this article has an interesting explanation regarding air density and also to some degree cold muscles.
Technical FAQ: Why is riding in the cold so hard? | VeloNews.com
Great link. I knew it was harder to bike in the cold I just didn't really know why
jorglueke is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 06:45 PM
  #17  
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Posts: 11,718

Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, Catrike Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1230 Post(s)
Liked 333 Times in 221 Posts
Originally Posted by Champlaincycler View Post
You guys are a lot smarter then me. Cold air being denser explains a lot. Now, we've been having an extended season here in northern NY, temps in the 40's by 10 am, rising to low 50's by noon all week. I've been telling my wife that 45-50 degrees feels so much colder in late fall then it does in late April/early May. Don't know why it is but I'm wearing lots more clothing now then I would be in the spring. Sun is lower, leaves and greenery gone is all I can come up with. Is this real, or imaginary?
The sun is warmer in early May than it is in November because May is just past the vernal equinox, whereas November is halfway to the winter solstice, on the far side of the autumnal equinox. (The sun is higher and has more warming power in May than it is in November.)
BlazingPedals is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 06:54 PM
  #18  
andr0id
Senior Member
 
andr0id's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,522
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1421 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by asgelle View Post
Where do you get ideas like this?
Let's suppose we have a bucket of a given size into which you can place molecules.

Suppose for our experiment H20 weighs 18. O2 weighs 32, and N2 weighs 28.

It starts out full of only O2 and N2. Now take some of those out and put in some H2Os. The bucket is lighter and therefore less dense. I guess spread out may be imprecise, but a water molecule is less dense for its 3 atoms than 2 atoms of either of the other gases.
andr0id is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 07:00 PM
  #19  
wphamilton
Senior Member
 
wphamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Posts: 15,181

Bikes: Nashbar Road

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2870 Post(s)
Liked 262 Times in 175 Posts
Originally Posted by andr0id View Post
Let's suppose we have a bucket of a given size into which you can place molecules.

Suppose for our experiment H20 weighs 18. O2 weighs 32, and N2 weighs 28.

It starts out full of only O2 and N2. Now take some of those out and put in some H2Os. The bucket is lighter and therefore less dense. I guess spread out may be imprecise, but a water molecule is less dense for its 3 atoms than 2 atoms of either of the other gases.
Close enough I'd think in terms of partial pressures, but the gist is that water vapor makes it less dense. Which can be confusing because of course liquid water is more dense than air.
wphamilton is offline  
Old 11-14-16, 07:01 PM
  #20  
asgelle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 4,142
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 741 Post(s)
Liked 231 Times in 143 Posts
Originally Posted by andr0id View Post
Let's suppose we have a bucket of a given size into which you can place molecules.

Suppose for our experiment H20 weighs 18. O2 weighs 32, and N2 weighs 28.

It starts out full of only O2 and N2. Now take some of those out and put in some H2Os. The bucket is lighter and therefore less dense. I guess spread out may be imprecise, but a water molecule is less dense for its 3 atoms than 2 atoms of either of the other gases.
In other words, by your own example, the distance between molecules is exactly the same. It's good to know you believe in the ideal gas law.
asgelle is offline  
Old 11-15-16, 10:17 AM
  #21  
wphamilton
Senior Member
 
wphamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Alpharetta, GA
Posts: 15,181

Bikes: Nashbar Road

Mentioned: 70 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2870 Post(s)
Liked 262 Times in 175 Posts
Originally Posted by caloso View Post
Clothing, probably.
Yeh I forgot about that. Even just some extra layers seems to be costly so I can see a half mph or more from that.
wphamilton is offline  
Old 11-16-16, 09:48 AM
  #22  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,598

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3902 Post(s)
Liked 1,337 Times in 824 Posts
Originally Posted by Abu Mahendra View Post
What effects, if any, does air humidity play in this? Colder air will be drier. Anything here?
Water decreases the density of air.

Originally Posted by andr0id View Post
Let's suppose we have a bucket of a given size into which you can place molecules.

Suppose for our experiment H20 weighs 18. O2 weighs 32, and N2 weighs 28.

It starts out full of only O2 and N2. Now take some of those out and put in some H2Os. The bucket is lighter and therefore less dense. I guess spread out may be imprecise, but a water molecule is less dense for its 3 atoms than 2 atoms of either of the other gases.
You are on the right track but have gone off the rails just a little and made it more complicated than it needs to be. It all has to do with the molar mass of the water and the air. On average, dry air has a molar mass of about 29 g/mol. Water has a molar mass of 18 g/mol. At a given temperature and pressure, the number of molecules in a volume of gas is constant. If you add water to a mass of dry air, the number of dry air molecules decreases to keep the pressure from increasing and the density of the mass of air decreases.

In layman's terms, some of the oxygen and nitrogen has to skooch over to make room for the water. The distance between the molecules doesn't change.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 11-16-16, 10:00 AM
  #23  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 23,598

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3902 Post(s)
Liked 1,337 Times in 824 Posts
Originally Posted by Dreww10 View Post
I think most cyclists are aware of how the air density in cold temperatures effects aerodynamics and in turn their speed for a given effort, but what I haven't seen is discussion of whether this causes the wind to have a multiplied effect on a rider. I've often felt that below 60 degrees F or thereabouts, a given wind speed becomes noticeably more difficult to ride into, independent of the diminished speed already caused by the increased air density. For example, when it's in the 30's, an 8-10 mph headwind seems to have the slowing effect of a 20 mph wind in the summer, but still has the normal effect of a 10 mph wind when at your back and your side.
While aerodynamics plays a bit of a role in the speed reduction, I would say that is its minor compared to other factors listed in the VeloNews article above. Above about 60°C, we tend to wear less clothing and have fewer restrictions. Our heart doesn't have to work against the cooling of the skin...if anything the heart works more efficiently at higher temperatures because the skin is shedding heat as rapidly as possible so the capillaries are wide open.

When it is warmer, we are using more energy to power the vehicle than to simply keep the engine warm (so to speak). Simply taking in air requires a significant amount of energy to warm it.

There is also a psychological component to riding in the cold. Frankly we are little monkeys from a very warm part of the world. We don't really like cold all that much and would rather be somewhere warm.

But we are also stubborn...and not a little dumb... so we just keep pushing through the cold when all the smart animals are sleeping the winter away. Way back in the back of your head there is a voice that is saying "The bears have it right. What the hell am I doing out here?" But we just keep suffering. That's not usually good for performance.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 11-16-16, 10:10 AM
  #24  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4361 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 21 Times in 21 Posts
The best predictor of air drag is the barometer reading. This correctly measures air density, factoring temperature, humidity (which lowers density, which is why a low barometer is a predictor of rain), and altitude.

So winter or summer, we live in a world where the normal barometer range is between 29 and 31" of mercury (at sea level), and can see swings in drag in the 10% range.

Once the increased drag from higher density is factored, that percentage difference remains the same at all speeds. However, a 10% difference in drag becomes more meaningful with increased speed because air drag is a larger percentage of total drag.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 11-16-16, 01:05 PM
  #25  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 39,739

Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper

Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2493 Post(s)
Liked 1,611 Times in 811 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
While aerodynamics plays a bit of a role in the speed reduction, I would say that is its minor compared to other factors listed in the VeloNews article above. Above about 60°C, we tend to wear less clothing and have fewer restrictions. Our heart doesn't have to work against the cooling of the skin...if anything the heart works more efficiently at higher temperatures because the skin is shedding heat as rapidly as possible so the capillaries are wide open.

When it is warmer, we are using more energy to power the vehicle than to simply keep the engine warm (so to speak). Simply taking in air requires a significant amount of energy to warm it.

There is also a psychological component to riding in the cold. Frankly we are little monkeys from a very warm part of the world. We don't really like cold all that much and would rather be somewhere warm.

But we are also stubborn...and not a little dumb... so we just keep pushing through the cold when all the smart animals are sleeping the winter away. Way back in the back of your head there is a voice that is saying "The bears have it right. What the hell am I doing out here?" But we just keep suffering. That's not usually good for performance.
Interesting. Power meter data, like what I posted above, only measures the energy that is transmitted to the cranks (or hubs or pedals), so it doesn't take that into account.
caloso is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.