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Would this be a waste of money?

Old 10-21-18, 09:59 PM
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SteelThisBike
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Would this be a waste of money?

I have an upgrade question. My two bikes are an early 2000s Bianchi Eros (Steel everything, Campy 9sp Mirage/Veloce mix) and a 2014 Bianchi Intenso 105 10sp. My question regards the Intenso. It is not that much lighter than my steel bike, maybe two pounds. However, I have some nerve damage in my neck and arm that makes it so hauling my bikes around my building can be a bit painful. I really notice the slight weight savings on the Intenso. Roughing out the specs, I believe I can shave another two pounds off this bike by swapping in a Sram Force 22 groupset and a set of lighter wheels. (I choose the Sram because of the quality level, low weight, and there are some good online deals around.)

I bought the Intenso used a couple of years ago. This upgrade would cost about $1,100 in parts, with new tires. So, I'd have $2k into a 2014 bike. Is this crazy? Would a future buyer appreciate the upgrade enough to pay more for the bike than the blue book on a 105 bike? I only know motorcycles, where the answer is usually "no, he'll pay less". I really like the Intenso but wish I'd gone with the higher spec model. It seems like a great frame with some clunky/heavy parts in this build.
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Old 10-21-18, 10:50 PM
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If you were to resell the bike after the upgrades, you wouldn't get much more than if you hadn't upgraded the bike. Your best bet would be to part it out and sell the upgraded parts separately.

Also note that bicycle blue book is not a good source for bike values. Their is no database to track used bike sales and they use an algorithm for value. The best determiner is eBay sold listings and factor in your used bike market.
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Old 10-21-18, 11:03 PM
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Thanks, that sounds like good advice. Ebay sold is a good bottom line reference.
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Old 10-21-18, 11:26 PM
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If your intention is too sell the bike after a while, I agree with katsup, it is a bad investment. If you plan to keep the bike for a very long time then upgrading is a great idea.

I am more concerned with your mention of nerve damage and the pain in causes wheeling your bike around your building. Does this nerve damage affect your riding? The reason I ask is because lighter doesn't always mean more comfortable and maybe another bike would be a better fit.
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Old 10-22-18, 12:01 AM
  #5  
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"I am more concerned with your mention of nerve damage and the pain in causes wheeling your bike around your building. Does this nerve damage affect your riding? The reason I ask is because lighter doesn't always mean more comfortable and maybe another bike would be a better fit."

Sorry, I should have been more precise. It doesn't hurt when riding my bikes, which is one reason I got back into riding bicycles after years of "motorcycle only". The nerve damage is mainly evident when lifting, extending my arm when carrying weight and even the impact of walking carrying weight. Bicycling around is a perfect solution since it is smooth. I also have hip problems that keep me off most sport motorcycles these days, but my Bianchis suit this well. The geometry of my hips, thighs, knees align well for riding them, so I haven't had pain there. I keep it lower wattage.

I'm pretty sure these bikes fit me, since I never feel beaten up after rides. My steel bike stretches me out nicely, while the carbon bike is more rangy feeling, upright, better for climbing hills. I love it but I do believe that at least a wheel upgrade would help a lot. I don't love the 105 gear so much, though it works fine. Actually the low-end Campy on my steel bike is somehow more pleasing. I really feel that the Intenso deserves better components -- but that's just a feeling; I don't have the experience to know for sure. It just seems like the frame is better than the running gear, which I guess is literally true since mine is the lower-spec version of the Intenso.

It will probably be never (well, perhaps sooner if a sudden need for money arises) before I would sell either bike. I really lucked out since they are both so pleasing to me. Very different bikes but both very satisfying. Also, so nice to look at in my living room. Very little wear and tear when I bought them, so no I have no desire to sell either one anytime soon. It's mainly an upgrade vs live with it vs buy a used version of the upgraded bike question. The latter being least desirable since the time involved isn't worth it. I'd more enjoy spending the time on a hot-rod project.
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Old 10-22-18, 12:14 AM
  #6  
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I agree with the others. Adding a very expensive groupset won't make your bike more valuable on the used market, perhaps with a few exceptions.

However, say you like the Bianchi now, but choose to upgrade to a different frame later, you could simply move your dream parts from one bike to another. Having a shop "build" the bike could prove to be expensive. However, if you do the work yourself, you really are out say $20 worth of cables, housings, and etc to move the parts from one bike to another.

Noting, of course, that we may see evolution in groupsets in the future (disc brakes, 12 speed, etc). So, moving an 11/22 groupset to another future frame might seem like you're stuck in time.

If you keep an eye open on E-Bay, you may be able to find a SRAM RED groupset for a similar price to your Force Groupset.
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Old 10-22-18, 01:00 AM
  #7  
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Thanks CliffordK, my neighbor did that with his high end Shimano gear. In his case, the drivetrain is fancier than the bike, but he's happy. I haven't seen Red for anywhere near the price of Force, at least not new.
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Old 10-24-18, 05:06 AM
  #8  
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I've been a motorcycle rider since 1975 and know the upgrade dilemma all too well. Since 1997 I've been riding Ducati so, again, money lost on upgrades. Not sure what your Bianchi Intenso weighs but I'm thinking it might be possible to buy a new/newer bike that will be lighter and have "better" components than what you have now. Some research needed but I'd do the research before I started upgrading.
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Old 10-24-18, 05:20 AM
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Just did a little research on the newest version of the Intenso w/105. It weighed in at 18.4 lbs. The retail price is $2200. I'm betting you could find a leftover for a bit less.
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Old 10-24-18, 07:18 AM
  #10  
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The SRAM Force is a really nice groupset. I'm curious, though: if you like the Campy groupset why you haven't thought about getting that for your Intenso?
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Old 10-24-18, 09:00 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by jgwilliams View Post
The SRAM Force is a really nice groupset. I'm curious, though: if you like the Campy groupset why you haven't thought about getting that for your Intenso?
Price. Guaranteed.

OP - I'd suggest getting a new wheelset first and see if that is good enough for what you're looking to do. You can always add the Force group later. (And I agree with you, 105 is heavy and clunky)
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Old 10-24-18, 09:42 AM
  #12  
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Or sell the Bianchi as-is, and put the money into a new lighter bike.
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Old 10-24-18, 09:44 AM
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Can you rig up a shoulder strap or alternate way of carrying that is less painful ?
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Old 10-24-18, 11:42 AM
  #14  
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I'm in the camp of it being worthwhile as long as you really like the way the bike fits and rides and intend to keep the bike for some time. I've done swaps like this and have swapped several bikes from downtube shifters to Campy or SRAM equipment. As long as you can do the work yourself (I find it easy, YMMV) then it's only a small investment in time to swap a bike over to new parts.

I'd also recommend looking for used parts on eBay. It may require some research to verify weights, but there is usually a big savings in price that my make this project much more desirable.
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Old 10-24-18, 11:53 AM
  #15  
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As another poster suggested you may be able to save the same or more weight by replacing the existing wheels, tires, and tubes with lighter versions.

You would need to weigh your existing equipment to make sure that this is worth doing - and verify the weights of the new stuff. But, you would probably spend less than the cost of replacing all the other components you mentioned in your original post. Plus, it's easier to do.
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Old 10-24-18, 01:42 PM
  #16  
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Thanks all for your insights. I'm liking the idea from shoota and jlaw of simply buying some lighter wheels and tires. Looking at the specs for mine, and some not-too-expensive upgrades, it looks like a half pound of weight could be removed. Probably not a huge deal for lifting the bike, but better road feel. Also, that's weight at the extreme ends of the load, so maybe it would help with carrying. My 105 components really do work fine. A bit less refined than my Campy but they are still good gear; I shouldn't kick them out of bed with so little wear on them. With the garbage I had to ride when I was younger and had zero money, man the 105 would have been like a Rolls Royce.

"I've been a motorcycle rider since 1975 and know the upgrade dilemma all too well. Since 1997 I've been riding Ducati so, again, money lost on upgrades."

I ride Moto Guzzis, so I know your situation. Some of the upgrade gear is so nice, though. Art for the eyes, ears and seat of pants lol.

"Can you rig up a shoulder strap or alternate way of carrying that is less painful ?"

I get jolts of pain doing nearly anything, so it's just part of life. I find that having any weight freely in hand is best, since usually a small adjustment in how I'm carrying a load helps. These bikes are still light at 19-23 pounds. It's just a big, awkward load that has to be maneuvered around things carefully (watch the spokes! OMG the carbon frame!).

"I'd also recommend looking for used parts on eBay."

Yes, there are some great deals I see, but other than looking for scuffs on housings and whatnot I can't really tell from pictures how much wear is on the gear. I know there's lots of guys who like to swap and build all the time, so there are no doubt lots of deals on lightly used gear.

This is a really fun hobby. Beauty, fitness, highly engineered parts and you don't have to pay for parking or insurance.
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Old 10-24-18, 01:59 PM
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I can't offer specific advice as I'm not familiar with any of the bikes mentioned. But me personally, I would only upgrade a bike if I was dead set on keeping it around for a very long time. OR perhaps you can use the upgrade groupset on a future frame purchase. It's just not worth the fuss unless you enjoy wrenching. I happen to enjoy it and spend excessive amounts of time swapping parts around from bike to bike (I have 5 bikes and they're all 9-speed on purpose).
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Old 10-24-18, 02:07 PM
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"The SRAM Force is a really nice groupset. I'm curious, though: if you like the Campy groupset why you haven't thought about getting that for your Intenso?"

I have looked at Campy, but the SRAM force offers the best in low weight/low cost in a highly recommended groupset. I really like the way my Campy Mirage/Veloce combo looks and works, and could probably do that for not much less money, but it is rather heavy. The lighter-weight Campy stuff is usually quite a bit more spend than the SRAM Force.

"It's just not worth the fuss unless you enjoy wrenching."

I do enjoy some wrenching, but don't have too much time for it. The more I get into bikes the more drawn I am to fantasy projects involving older steel frames and new gear. Or just old bikes. I have an old Trek mountain bike with Suntour drivetrain I've been meaning to give some love.
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Old 10-24-18, 05:05 PM
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Originally Posted by SteelThisBike View Post
"......I am to fantasy projects involving older steel frames and new gear. Or just old bikes. I have an old Trek mountain bike with Suntour drivetrain I've been meaning to give some love.
Yes, rehab projects with vintage steel bikes really are fun. Simply searching Craigslist for an unappreciated treasure is a great way to spend an hour or two. But you're right about it being easy to spend $$$$ quickly. Some projects are worth the money if the bike is a 'keeper'.
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Old 10-24-18, 10:44 PM
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Originally Posted by jlaw View Post
Yes, rehab projects with vintage steel bikes really are fun. Simply searching Craigslist for an unappreciated treasure is a great way to spend an hour or two. But you're right about it being easy to spend $$$$ quickly. Some projects are worth the money if the bike is a 'keeper'.
Agreed. It has to be a labor of love and not with the intention of flipping. Too easy to get upside down in these situations.
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Old 10-25-18, 03:16 AM
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Originally Posted by SteelThisBike View Post
I have looked at Campy, but the SRAM force offers the best in low weight/low cost in a highly recommended groupset. I really like the way my Campy Mirage/Veloce combo looks and works, and could probably do that for not much less money, but it is rather heavy. The lighter-weight Campy stuff is usually quite a bit more spend than the SRAM Force.
Yes, I actually came to the same conclusion and bought a bike with SRAM Force 22 groupset fitted. I like the fact that it all operates from a single lever. My old Campy 9-speed works very well indeed but having to move my thumb to operate one lever means that I often mess up, even after eighteen years of riding the same groupset. Ultegra is really good value for money but I find the chainset hideous and I don't like the fact that the brake levers move sideways.

It's hard to buy anything other than Shimano over here on new bikes. You'd think that being part of Europe (at the moment) Campagnolo would be reasonably available, but it seems not. Quite why so few bikes come with SRAM groupsets, though, is something of a mystery. It's mostly smaller, independent manufacturers who do it, at least at the low to medium end. SRAM Red e-tap is quite popular, though, but I prefer not to have something that I have to keep charged up simply for the bike to work.

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Old 10-25-18, 07:18 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by SteelThisBike View Post
"...I get jolts of pain doing nearly anything, so it's just part of life. I find that having any weight freely in hand is best, since usually a small adjustment in how I'm carrying a load helps. These bikes are still light at 19-23 pounds. It's just a big, awkward load that has to be maneuvered around things carefully
Would it be practical or possible to remove one or both wheels? That would necessitate two or more trips, and if you are in an apartment that may mean locking a wheel or wheels while transporting the frame.

Also, there is the Japanese rinko system where full-size bikes are fitted with couplers to quickly disassemble them for train travel. This may add a small amount of weight, but each section would weigh less.

I realize this may be an impractical suggestion, but it was just a thought.
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Old 10-25-18, 08:26 AM
  #23  
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"I realize this may be an impractical suggestion, but it was just a thought."

I appreciate it. The issues with the carbon bike have to do with it being a more delicate thing, and a compact frame. The steel bike I just sling over my shoulder. The carbon bike is more awkward to carry that way, plus I'm paranoid about bumping into things. Anyway, I play through the occasional pain. Getting exercise is too important.

"It's hard to buy anything other than Shimano over here on new bikes. You'd think that being part of Europe (at the moment) Campagnolo would be reasonably available, but it seems not."

Same here; I don't see much Campy. It's a shame, really, especially on Italian brand bikes that already have their frames made in Taiwan. C'mon, throw us a bone, Bianchi!. I'm surprised there's not more Campy in your shops, though. I'm going to treasure my Campy 9 speed. I like the way it works and really like the way it looks. It's good to hear from a Sram Force 22 user. Not many OEMs are using Sram, either. Shimano is just crushing everyone with the OEM sales.
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