Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Stairs.

Old 05-06-20, 03:53 AM
  #1  
Hane
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2020
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Stairs.

I'll be 62 in October. I really want to start riding but I live on the second floor of my apartment building. My dilemma is how to safely and easily take it up and down the stairs.
Hane is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 04:31 AM
  #2  
billas
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 15
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Welcome. Maybe get a light bike that you can bring up/down the stairs. Or even a folding bike might do.
billas is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 04:43 AM
  #3  
cb400bill
Inoxidable Moderator
 
cb400bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Kalamazoo MI
Posts: 18,815

Bikes: Fuji SL 2.1 Carbon, Cannondale Synapse Alloy, Trek 710 531 Steel

Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2190 Post(s)
Liked 2,150 Times in 1,340 Posts
Thread moved from Introductions to General Cycling.
cb400bill is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 05:07 AM
  #4  
subgrade
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Rīga, Latvia
Posts: 822

Bikes: Focus Crater Lake

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked 297 Times in 179 Posts
What exactly is the dilemma? Do you have a medical condition that impedes carrying a bike up and down the stairs, or is the stair well too narrow, or something else? Generally that should not pose much problems. Of course, a lighter bike makes it a bit easier, but one gets used to it either way. Just take it slow and take care to not bang against the walls and/or handrail. The grip used varies with the frame shape and size, but you should be able to figure out easily what is the most comfortable way for you.
subgrade is offline  
Likes For subgrade:
Old 05-06-20, 05:11 AM
  #5  
JenGQ
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 8

Bikes: Giant Escape 3, Giant Expressway, Giant Sedona

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
I use to live in a second story apartment. What I did was hold on to the handlebars and lift the bike vertically so it was standing on it's rear wheel and then kind of let gravity "roll" it down each step. Not sure if that makes sense. Going up I just pushed it normally on two wheels.
JenGQ is offline  
Likes For JenGQ:
Old 05-06-20, 05:11 AM
  #6  
Prowler 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Near Pottstown, PA: 30 miles NW of Philadelphia
Posts: 1,688

Bikes: 2 Trek Mtn, Cannondale R600 road, 6 vintage road bikes

Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 297 Post(s)
Liked 245 Times in 144 Posts
We need a lot more information in order to help. Tell us about the stairs, straight, turns with landings, how much room at the ends. Tell us about the bike. Type, suspension, make and model. Go post some replays to 10 other members (nice useful stuff vs just garbage postings) then come back here and post pictures of the bike and the stairwell. Tell us about you - state of fitness, height, weight, how new to cycling...

At 68, I work part time at an LBS so I lift and carry all sorts of bikes, even up and down stairs. I have to be pretty careful some times. Some bikes are a breeze, and not just tiny carbon bikes. Some are just awful - "give me hazardous duty pay for that one." Lots of variations. Some bikes I can bounce around on one wheel, others need a fork lift. Some are well balanced others are hopelessly clumsy. There are some tips/tricks but sometimes you need to put safety first and then just tough it out to build the strength.

Tell us much more. You may be fine or you may be advised to get another bike. I see LOTS of people these days who have dug "an old bike" out of a shed cuz they now want to try cycling. Many of those old shed bikes are the worst. Many are not worth 1/2 hour's labor cost.

BTW all my own bikes are on the ground floor so the only lifting is onto my car rack. Easy peasy.
Prowler is offline  
Likes For Prowler:
Old 05-06-20, 05:27 AM
  #7  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 6,313

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1170 Post(s)
Liked 934 Times in 510 Posts
Use some variation of the cyclocross carry (pictured below). I started this method in my early teens. It has served me for nearly 50 years. You can do it, too.

Phil_gretz is offline  
Likes For Phil_gretz:
Old 05-06-20, 05:35 AM
  #8  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 24,862

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r

Mentioned: 103 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3722 Post(s)
Liked 851 Times in 592 Posts
sympathies. I have to deal w/ 1 flight into my basement. so not a lot. but sometimes they can be challenging. watch your body & knee position & besure the stairs are free of obstacles
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 06:51 AM
  #9  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 22,195

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 130 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2430 Post(s)
Liked 939 Times in 603 Posts
Wide handlebars are what cause me the most problems carrying bikes up and down stairs.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 07:25 AM
  #10  
Russ Roth
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: South Shore of Long Island
Posts: 1,375

Bikes: 2010 Carrera Volans, 2015 C-Dale Trail 2sl, 2017 Raleigh Rush Hour, 2017 Blue Proseccio, 1992 Giant Perigee, 80s Gitane Rallye Tandem

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 500 Post(s)
Liked 349 Times in 272 Posts
Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
Use some variation of the cyclocross carry (pictured below). I started this method in my early teens. It has served me for nearly 50 years. You can do it, too.
To make it easier there are frame bags that go in the corner of the frame and have a built in shoulder strap, they'll make it gentler on the shoulder for carrying it and are a good option.
Russ Roth is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 07:33 AM
  #11  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 5,147

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International

Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1112 Post(s)
Liked 840 Times in 407 Posts
If you have quick release wheels and a quick release seatpost, two trips may be easier than one (your knees may disagree).

Even removing just the front wheel may lighten things enough, or remove some bulk.

Folding bikes tend to be just as heavy as non-folding bikes, and sometimes heavier.

Also, a couple of types of straps may be helpful:

BobbyG is offline  
Likes For BobbyG:
Old 05-06-20, 07:33 AM
  #12  
catacombs
Member
 
catacombs's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: /home/
Posts: 28

Bikes: Kilo TT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
How narrow are your stairs, OP?
catacombs is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 07:49 AM
  #13  
hillyman 
WALSTIB
 
hillyman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 1,798
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 280 Post(s)
Liked 374 Times in 180 Posts




Montague's fold and some come with a bag or can be purchased separately. Takes up less space and easier to carry especially with bag
__________________
www.bikeleague.org

hillyman is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 08:03 AM
  #14  
Oneder
Banned.
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 822

Bikes: Wahoo of Theseus, others

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 45 Posts
If you can install an I bolt maybe you could lower it on a rope. The issue I'd have with carrying it downstairs is you could trip and kill yourself. OTOH if the stairs are straight down you could possibly ride down slowly.
Oneder is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 08:29 AM
  #15  
Phil_gretz
Journeyman Bike Commuter
 
Phil_gretz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 6,313

Bikes: '71 Jeunet 640, '79 Peugeot PXN10LE, '88 Fuji Saratoga, '13 Motobecane Fantom29 HT, '16 Motobecane Turino Pro Disc, '16 Motobecane Gran Premio Elite, '18 Velobuild VB-R-022

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1170 Post(s)
Liked 934 Times in 510 Posts
Originally Posted by Oneder View Post
If you can install an I bolt maybe you could lower it on a rope. The issue I'd have with carrying it downstairs is you could trip and kill yourself. OTOH if the stairs are straight down you could possibly ride down slowly.
The OP was concerned that he would be unable to carry a bike on stairs. I guess for some, riding down stairs is more controlled that walking down the same stairs.
Phil_gretz is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 08:57 AM
  #16  
Oneder
Banned.
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 822

Bikes: Wahoo of Theseus, others

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 45 Posts
Originally Posted by Phil_gretz View Post
The OP was concerned that he would be unable to carry a bike on stairs. I guess for some, riding down stairs is more controlled that walking down the same stairs.
Depending on the stairs it can be, I do it all the time. Carrying down the stairs is awkward and you are very likely to trip.
Oneder is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 09:34 AM
  #17  
subgrade
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Rīga, Latvia
Posts: 822

Bikes: Focus Crater Lake

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 363 Post(s)
Liked 297 Times in 179 Posts
Originally Posted by Oneder View Post
Depending on the stairs it can be, I do it all the time. Carrying down the stairs is awkward and you are very likely to trip.
You must be descending very steep stairs then. I don't find carrying bike up or down normal (50%) stairs any more awkward than just walking up or down the stairs. Currently I have to cover only two flights of stairs, so I don't bother lifting it up on my shoulder as I would do for longer ascents/descents; I just hold it by the top tube, closer to head tube when going up and closer to seat tube when going down, with the other hand on the handlebars
subgrade is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 10:02 AM
  #18  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 12,672

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 142 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6066 Post(s)
Liked 936 Times in 531 Posts
Tip the bike onto the back wheel and keep one hand on the rear brakes, ... on the way down you can roll it backwards ... assuming over the shoulder doesn't work for you.

Since it is an apartment building I am guessing major mechanical modifications might not be viewed favorably by the management.
Maelochs is offline  
Likes For Maelochs:
Old 05-06-20, 10:11 AM
  #19  
Oneder
Banned.
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 822

Bikes: Wahoo of Theseus, others

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 45 Posts
Originally Posted by subgrade View Post
You must be descending very steep stairs then. I don't find carrying bike up or down normal (50%) stairs any more awkward than just walking up or down the stairs. Currently I have to cover only two flights of stairs, so I don't bother lifting it up on my shoulder as I would do for longer ascents/descents; I just hold it by the top tube, closer to head tube when going up and closer to seat tube when going down, with the other hand on the handlebars
It depends more on how narrow the stairs are. If they are narrow then it would be very awkward unless you lift up the bike overhead which might be hard for someone who is in their 60s. If they are narrow but not too steep then I would just ride down. Or even walk the bike down if very wide. I am not 62 yet only in 40s but should be doable to ride down if there are no turns and it's not too steep.
Oneder is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 11:53 AM
  #20  
Oneder
Banned.
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 822

Bikes: Wahoo of Theseus, others

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Liked 65 Times in 45 Posts
You could also grab the grips and hit the rear wheel break and walk it down from behind while using the rear break to balance the bike. That should work. Edit: whoops did not see maelochs already posted that idea.

Last edited by Oneder; 05-06-20 at 01:00 PM.
Oneder is offline  
Likes For Oneder:
Old 05-06-20, 12:35 PM
  #21  
GlennR
On Your Left
 
GlennR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Long Island, New York, USA
Posts: 7,678

Bikes: Trek Emonda SLR, Sram eTap, Zipp 303

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2507 Post(s)
Liked 1,618 Times in 836 Posts
I rather carry a light road bike than a heavy e-bike.
GlennR is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 01:24 PM
  #22  
Charliekeet
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 485

Bikes: S-Works Stumpjumper HT Disc, Fuji Absolute, '85 Cannondale SR900, Marin Hawk Hill SE, Giant OCR1

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 141 Post(s)
Liked 89 Times in 60 Posts
My #1 tip is don't carry the bike up on your shoulder etc- if you lose balance, you're screwed. Keep its center of gravity lower than that, and don't have its weight up-hill (up the stairs) from you, so if you lose grip, it doesn't tumble back down and knock you down the stairs.
So I try to sort of walk side-by-side with the bike, one hand gripping the headtube/stem are or the front wheel (rather than handlebar/grip) to keep things centered, one on seat-tube or where seat tube meets the top tube for the majority of the lifting.
Charliekeet is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 01:40 PM
  #23  
Wileyrat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Tucson Az
Posts: 1,613

Bikes: 2015 Ridley Fenix, 1983 Team Fuji, 2019 Marin Nail Trail 6, and a few dust collectors

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 321 Post(s)
Liked 166 Times in 109 Posts
I donít know.

Iím 61 and I carry my bike upstairs with the top tube on my shoulder just fine. Anything else seems awkward.
Wileyrat is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 03:08 PM
  #24  
wolfchild
Senior Member
 
wolfchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Mississauga/Toronto, Ontario canada
Posts: 6,490

Bikes: I have 3 singlespeed/fixed gear bikes

Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1980 Post(s)
Liked 747 Times in 389 Posts
I live on the 12 floor and I carried my 30 pound bike while also wearing a loaded backpack when one of our elevators was out of service and I didn't feel like waiting for the second elevator. I am only 50 so a lot younger than OP.
wolfchild is offline  
Old 05-06-20, 05:12 PM
  #25  
catacombs
Member
 
catacombs's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Location: /home/
Posts: 28

Bikes: Kilo TT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
I live on the 12 floor and I carried my 30 pound bike.
Nice. I went to Berlin a few years ago and stayed a nine-story walk up, and I had never felt so winded. I don't know how I'd manage walking up 12 flights with a 30-pound bike.
catacombs is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.