Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Disk Brakes

Old 05-11-20, 11:12 AM
  #1  
Chasboy
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 21
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Disk Brakes

Hi folks, Iíve been noticing the development of disk brakes for bikes and I admit I was pretty skeptical since the discs are so small compared to the actual rim. Can anyone tell me why the disks are effective? I understand that the swept area is larger but isnít the leverage at a disadvantage with the disc being so close to the hub? I looked for answers online and got no where.

In addition, are the mechanical disk brakes as effective as the hydraulics?
Thanks a lot.
Chasboy is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 11:29 AM
  #2  
Kapusta
Cyclochondriac
 
Kapusta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,698
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2042 Post(s)
Liked 1,423 Times in 815 Posts
In short the smaller size of the disc is offset by the higher clamping force of the caliper, and the discís ability to withstand it.
Kapusta is offline  
Likes For Kapusta:
Old 05-11-20, 11:51 AM
  #3  
AndreyT
Senior Member
 
AndreyT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: CA
Posts: 400
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked 32 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by Chasboy View Post
Can anyone tell me why the disks are effective? I understand that the swept area is larger but isn’t the leverage at a disadvantage with the disc being so close to the hub?
You are absolutely right. Disc brakes are at mechanical disadvantage compared to rim brakes. Disc brakes have to compensate for that by generating more braking force between the disc and the pads, i.e. by exerting more clamping force. They do it. And they do it successfully.

Originally Posted by Chasboy View Post
In addition, are the mechanical disk brakes as effective as the hydraulics?
Bicycle brake efficiency is capped by such objective limits as 1) wheel losing traction and beginning to skid, or 2) bicycle flipping over the front wheel. So, if your braking system can provide enough braking force to reach these objective limits, your braking system is obviously as efficient as any braking system can possibly be. Mechanical disc brakes easily reach these limits, which means that they are equally as effective as hydraulic ones.

The parameter that might differ here is not the efficiency, but rather the precision of the braking system, a.k.a. "modulation". I.e. how easy it is to precisely control intermediate braking forces from the braking lever. Hydraulic brakes usually offer better modulation than mechanical ones.

Another parameter that might differ is heat resistance. Mechanical brakes usually resist overheating better than hydraulic ones.

Last edited by AndreyT; 05-11-20 at 11:55 AM.
AndreyT is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 11:52 AM
  #4  
tomato coupe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,381

Bikes: Colnago, Van Dessel, Factor, Cervelo, Ritchey

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1460 Post(s)
Liked 2,179 Times in 906 Posts
Originally Posted by Chasboy View Post
Hi folks, Iíve been noticing the development of disk brakes for bikes and I admit I was pretty skeptical since the discs are so small compared to the actual rim. Can anyone tell me why the disks are effective?.
The diameter of the disc rotors is not a limiting factor in the design.
tomato coupe is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 11:57 AM
  #5  
Paul Barnard
For The Fun of It
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Louisissippi Coast
Posts: 4,897

Bikes: Lynskey Backroad, Litespeed T6, Lynskey MT29, Burley Duet

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1560 Post(s)
Liked 839 Times in 430 Posts
Originally Posted by AndreyT View Post
You are absolutely right. Disc brakes are at mechanical disadvantage compared to rim brakes. Disc brakes have to compensate for that by generating more braking force between the disc and the pads, i.e. by exerting more clamping force. They do it. And they do it successfully.



Bicycle brake efficiency is capped by such objective limits as 1) wheel losing traction and beginning to skid, or 2) bicycle flipping over the front wheel. So, if your braking system can provide enough braking force to reach these objective limits, your braking system is obviously as efficient as any braking system can possibly be. Mechanical disc brakes easily reach these limits, which means that they are equally as effective as hydraulic ones.

The parameter that might differ here is not the efficiency, but rather the precision of the braking system, a.k.a. "modulation". Hydraulic brakes usually offer better modulation than mechanical ones.

Another parameter that might differ is heat resistance. Mechanical brakes usually resist overheating better than hydraulic ones.

I was getting ready to type out a response, but you said it better than I would have. I prefer mechanicals only because for me they are easier to work on. I have ridden rim brakes and various mechanical and hydraulic disc brakes. The only time I had an issue I couldn't resolve myself was with hydraulics.
Paul Barnard is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 01:53 PM
  #6  
Chasboy
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 21
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Hypothetically, if the disk and caliper were located out near the rim, (the disk would be about 26Ē in diameter), wouldnít less clamping pressure be required, leaving everything else the same?
Chasboy is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 02:14 PM
  #7  
Tacoenthusiast
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 232
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 127 Post(s)
Liked 220 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by Chasboy View Post
Hypothetically, if the disk and caliper were located out near the rim, (the disk would be about 26Ē in diameter), wouldnít less clamping pressure be required, leaving everything else the same?
Yeah but the disk would be big and heavy.....


Google Buell motorcycle if you want to see what that looks like
Tacoenthusiast is offline  
Likes For Tacoenthusiast:
Old 05-11-20, 02:17 PM
  #8  
Kapusta
Cyclochondriac
 
Kapusta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,698
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2042 Post(s)
Liked 1,423 Times in 815 Posts
Originally Posted by Chasboy View Post
Hypothetically, if the disk and caliper were located out near the rim, (the disk would be about 26Ē in diameter), wouldnít less clamping pressure be required, leaving everything else the same?
Yes, a 26Ē rotor would require much less clamping force than a 6Ē rotor.

Is there a point?
Kapusta is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 02:21 PM
  #9  
surak
Senior Member
 
surak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,590

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix, Canyon Inflite AL SLX, Priority Continuum Onyx, Santana Vision, Kent Dual-Drive Tandem

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 687 Post(s)
Liked 529 Times in 304 Posts
I've been kicked off an MTB with 203mm front rotor without exerting much force. As others have said, there's no need to go larger. The advantage to smaller rotors are weight and ground clearance -- the latter results in less contamination from ground spray.
surak is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 02:25 PM
  #10  
Koyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 4,006
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3916 Post(s)
Liked 5,177 Times in 2,290 Posts
My mechanical disc brakes stop about as effectively as a good set of rim brakes. And they are all perfectly adequate.

My hydro disc brakes generate muuuuch more stopping power than that, which allows me to more easily modulate my speed on some of the very steep descents around here -- I can do it without having to death grip the brake levers.
Koyote is offline  
Likes For Koyote:
Old 05-11-20, 02:50 PM
  #11  
Troul 
:D
 
Troul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mich
Posts: 4,360
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 1,107 Times in 795 Posts
the pad's surface to the rotor impacts the longevity for braking. Too small of a pad can lead to glazing while sacrificing the ability to stop as intended.
__________________
-Oh Hey!
Troul is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 03:17 PM
  #12  
alo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 1,059
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 528 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 254 Times in 185 Posts
Bike wheels often develop slight wobbles. If rim brakes were really close to the rim, they would rub. So rim brakes are set up with a fairly large gap between the rim and the brakes. When you apply the brakes, there is a fairly large distance for the brake to travel before it contacts the rim. Because rim brakes are designed for this large movement, less force is applied to the brakes.

With disc brakes, the pads can be less than half a millimetre from the disk. Because there is much less movement in disc brakes, the same amount of force on the brakes lever results in much more pressure on the disc pads.
alo is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 03:51 PM
  #13  
Koyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 4,006
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3916 Post(s)
Liked 5,177 Times in 2,290 Posts
Originally Posted by alo View Post
Bike wheels often develop slight wobbles. If rim brakes were really close to the rim, they would rub. So rim brakes are set up with a fairly large gap between the rim and the brakes. When you apply the brakes, there is a fairly large distance for the brake to travel before it contacts the rim. Because rim brakes are designed for this large movement, less force is applied to the brakes.
Iím not sure what this means, but Iím pretty sure itís wrong.
Koyote is offline  
Likes For Koyote:
Old 05-11-20, 04:05 PM
  #14  
Chasboy
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 21
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
Yes, a 26Ē rotor would require much less clamping force than a 6Ē rotor.

Is there a point?
yes, Iím just trying to get it clear in my mind that for the disk more pressure is required, contact patch is increased and the technology to exert the pressure needed is available in the caliper design, which apparently it is. Rim brakes donít exert that much pressure and the rim contact patch as well as itís stability is not as good as the disk.
Chasboy is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 04:32 PM
  #15  
Kapusta
Cyclochondriac
 
Kapusta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,698
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2042 Post(s)
Liked 1,423 Times in 815 Posts
Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
Iím not sure what this means, but Iím pretty sure itís wrong.
Maybe not well articulated, but Alo is basically correct (if I am reading him correctly).

On rim brakes, since the brake pads need to cover more distance before hitting the rim, the mechanical advantage of the lever over the pads needs to be less less (so that more pad travel distance can be covered as you pull the lever).

Part of the reason that disc allows more mechanical advantage of the levers over the pads is that the pads can be set up very close to the rotor, so you can set up the system with the lever having more mechanical advantage over the pads without spending a whole bunch of lever throw just reaching the rotor.

Not sure If I explained that any better, but there you go.
Kapusta is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 05:07 PM
  #16  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 24,328

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4306 Post(s)
Liked 1,811 Times in 1,102 Posts
Originally Posted by AndreyT View Post
Bicycle brake efficiency is capped by such objective limits as 1) wheel losing traction and beginning to skid, or 2) bicycle flipping over the front wheel. So, if your braking system can provide enough braking force to reach these objective limits, your braking system is obviously as efficient as any braking system can possibly be. Mechanical disc brakes easily reach these limits, which means that they are equally as effective as hydraulic ones.
Just to be clear, the wheel that loses traction is the rear wheel. The front wheel canít skid on a bicycle. The rider will flip over the front wheel before that happens. Rim brakes can easily reach the same limit as any rim mounted disc brake.

Originally Posted by AndreyT View Post
The parameter that might differ here is not the efficiency, but rather the precision of the braking system, a.k.a. "modulation". I.e. how easy it is to precisely control intermediate braking forces from the braking lever. Hydraulic brakes usually offer better modulation than mechanical ones.

Another parameter that might differ is heat resistance. Mechanical brakes usually resist overheating better than hydraulic ones.
Your definition of modulation is correct but itís not something that I have ever experienced with hydraulics. Hydraulics have always been powerful in my experience but itís just raw power. Trying to control it in those places where intermediate braking is needed is not easy. Every hydraulic Iíve used has been grabby with control always on the edge of disaster. Mechanical (and rim brakes, for that matter) provide exactly the intermediate control as you describe it.

Originally Posted by Chasboy View Post
Hypothetically, if the disk and caliper were located out near the rim, (the disk would be about 26Ē in diameter), wouldnít less clamping pressure be required, leaving everything else the same?
Hint, look at a rim and rim brake caliper. Look at a hub mounted disc and the caliper. Notice something? They are exactly the same. Same principle and very similar mechanism. They only differ in pad material. That is why hub mounted discs are somewhat better (but only somewhat). A rim brake could be made that is just as effective as a hub mounted disc if we were willing to use steel rim and sintered metal pads.

Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
My mechanical disc brakes stop about as effectively as a good set of rim brakes. And they are all perfectly adequate.

My hydro disc brakes generate muuuuch more stopping power than that, which allows me to more easily modulate my speed on some of the very steep descents around here -- I can do it without having to death grip the brake levers.
I havenít ever had ďa death gripĒ on any brake lever. Iíve mountain bike and ridden heavily loaded touring bikes...both road and off-road...with nearly every brake system around. Even with old center pull Weinmannís, never had a death grip. The only brake that Iíve ever had to be cautious with is hydraulic. I never found them to have a middle ground...only on and off.

Originally Posted by alo View Post
Bike wheels often develop slight wobbles. If rim brakes were really close to the rim, they would rub. So rim brakes are set up with a fairly large gap between the rim and the brakes. When you apply the brakes, there is a fairly large distance for the brake to travel before it contacts the rim. Because rim brakes are designed for this large movement, less force is applied to the brakes..
If the wheels wobble, fix the wobble. Hub mounted rotors can just as easily develop a wobble and rub. Removing the wobble is much harder than taking it out of a rim. Spokes are easier to minor adjustments because itís just a simple tension adjustment. Rotors require bending that is far less precise.

You also have the distance argument wrong. Rim brakes donít need to have a huge gap between the rim and the pad. They are often set up with a huge gap between the rim and the pad. Most bikes are adjusted so that the pad doesnít hit the rim until about the lever has moved about half way to the bar. I donít care what Sheldon Brown says, that makes for very mushy brakes and what many people experience when they use poorly set up rim brakes.

Originally Posted by alo View Post
With disc brakes, the pads can be less than half a millimetre from the disk. Because there is much less movement in disc brakes, the same amount of force on the brakes lever results in much more pressure on the disc pads.
And here is the reason that many people dislike rim brakes. If the rim brake is set up so that the brake actuates much earlier in the pull, the brakes feel more powerful and the braking feels better. You can detune disc brakes to the same half lever pull and the best hub mounted disc will be the worst brake you have ever used.

Originally Posted by Chasboy View Post
yes, Iím just trying to get it clear in my mind that for the disk more pressure is required, contact patch is increased and the technology to exert the pressure needed is available in the caliper design, which apparently it is. Rim brakes donít exert that much pressure and the rim contact patch as well as itís stability is not as good as the disk.
A well set up rim brake will exert enough braking force to send a rider over the bars. Thatís the limit of braking for bicycle under any brake.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 05-11-20, 05:14 PM
  #17  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 24,328

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4306 Post(s)
Liked 1,811 Times in 1,102 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
Maybe not well articulated, but Alo is basically correct (if I am reading him correctly).

On rim brakes, since the brake pads need to cover more distance before hitting the rim, the mechanical advantage of the lever over the pads needs to be less less (so that more pad travel distance can be covered as you pull the lever).

Part of the reason that disc allows more mechanical advantage of the levers over the pads is that the pads can be set up very close to the rotor, so you can set up the system with the lever having more mechanical advantage over the pads without spending a whole bunch of lever throw just reaching the rotor.

Not sure If I explained that any better, but there you go.
There is nothing that limits a rim brake from being set up close to the rim. Again, if the rim wobbles, thatís something that can, and should, be fixed. Iíve run my brakes so that the wheel is locked at about half travel of the lever which is similar to how hub mounted discs have to be set up. I currently have bikes with hub mounted discs, dual pivot rim brakes, mixed front disc/rear linear and cantilevers...Oh! The humanity! The cantilevers are actually on the bike that requires the most braking power...a loaded touring bike. Iíve even ridden that one down New Found Gap in North Carolina in a driving rain at around 50mph. I had no problem slowing nor stopping.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 05:25 PM
  #18  
Chasboy
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Posts: 21
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
thank you all. It’s been enlightening and my questions were answered and then some.
Chasboy is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 05:28 PM
  #19  
restlessswind
Senior Member
 
restlessswind's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 400

Bikes: 2017 Surly Cross-Check. 2020 Specialized Turbo Vado 3.0, 2002 GT Dyno Roadster, 2020 Giant Fathom 2, 2011 Trek Pure Sport

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 151 Post(s)
Liked 56 Times in 38 Posts
Rim brakes are my preferred brake in dry road conditions. When dry, they are solid and easy to deal with. Disc brakes are at an advantage for MTB as the rim gets in the mud. Disc's stay clean. Discs also work well when wet...just like cars. Mechanical discs seem to be harder to keep adjusted, and always dealing with the rotor rub, or brushing that can be annoying. Some mechanical disc calipers are about useless too. I crashed into someone due to a weak braking system. Hydraulic brakes are much more sensitive and require less effort to squeeze. My wife has arthritis, and this is a benefit for her hands. New hydraulic brake hoses can be very costly to replace or lengthen They all have pros and cons, but some mechanical disc calipers are no good for anything.
restlessswind is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 06:22 PM
  #20  
Kapusta
Cyclochondriac
 
Kapusta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,698
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2042 Post(s)
Liked 1,423 Times in 815 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
There is nothing that limits a rim brake from being set up close to the rim. Again, if the rim wobbles, that’s something that can, and should, be fixed. I’ve run my brakes so that the wheel is locked at about half travel of the lever which is similar to how hub mounted discs have to be set up. I currently have bikes with hub mounted discs, dual pivot rim brakes, mixed front disc/rear linear and cantilevers...Oh! The humanity! The cantilevers are actually on the bike that requires the most braking power...a loaded touring bike. I’ve even ridden that one down New Found Gap in North Carolina in a driving rain at around 50mph. I had no problem slowing nor stopping.
You completely missed my point. Like... completely**. And I think you missed Alo's as well.

Are you claiming that you set your rim brake pads as close to your rim as your disc pads to your rotor? Please think hard before you answer this.

**EDIT: A better way to say that would have been "I don't think we are not talking about the same thing". From your response you seem to think my post is weighing in the relative merits of disc brakes vs rim. It is not.

Last edited by Kapusta; 05-11-20 at 09:04 PM.
Kapusta is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 06:52 PM
  #21  
Koyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 4,006
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3916 Post(s)
Liked 5,177 Times in 2,290 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
Maybe not well articulated, but Alo is basically correct (if I am reading him correctly).

On rim brakes, since the brake pads need to cover more distance before hitting the rim, the mechanical advantage of the lever over the pads needs to be less less (so that more pad travel distance can be covered as you pull the lever).

Part of the reason that disc allows more mechanical advantage of the levers over the pads is that the pads can be set up very close to the rotor, so you can set up the system with the lever having more mechanical advantage over the pads without spending a whole bunch of lever throw just reaching the rotor.

Not sure If I explained that any better, but there you go.
Here is what I meant: as long as it is impossible to pull the lever all the way to the handle bar, I think you can develop the same amount of force on the brakes whether the pads are very close to the rims (so donít need to pull the lever very far), or the pads are just a bit further away (and hence you have to pull the lever is a bit further).

Iím willing to be corrected if Iím wrong...But even if thatís the case, I donít think there is any advantage in having so little brake lever travel.
Koyote is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 07:03 PM
  #22  
Steve B.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 5,152

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Cannondale Topstone, Miyata City Liner, Specialized Chisel

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2013 Post(s)
Liked 739 Times in 456 Posts
And in case anybody wondered, and as the OP asked about “Disk” brakes, with a “K”, generally the British use the spelling of “Disc”, while the U.S. it’s typically “Disk”.

I was curious so though I should look it up.
Steve B. is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 07:15 PM
  #23  
Kapusta
Cyclochondriac
 
Kapusta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,698
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2042 Post(s)
Liked 1,423 Times in 815 Posts
Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
Here is what I meant: as long as it is impossible to pull the lever all the way to the handle bar, I think you can develop the same amount of force on the brakes whether the pads are very close to the rims (so donít need to pull the lever very far), or the pads are just a bit further away (and hence you have to pull the lever is a bit further).

Iím willing to be corrected if Iím wrong...But even if thatís the case, I donít think there is any advantage in having so little brake lever travel.
OK, you and Cylclo seem to be on some other subject entirely from what I (and I believe Alo) are talking about. He was not wrong, you just don't get what he is talking about.

Kapusta is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 07:27 PM
  #24  
Koyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 4,006
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3916 Post(s)
Liked 5,177 Times in 2,290 Posts
Originally Posted by Kapusta View Post
OK, you and Cylclo seem to be on some other subject entirely from what I (and I believe Alo) are talking about. He was not wrong, you just don't get what he is talking about.
I understand what the two of you are talking about… I just think you’re both wrong.

Please note that you have now told two of us that we don’t understand your arguments. So, perhaps the problem is not with us...?
Koyote is offline  
Old 05-11-20, 07:46 PM
  #25  
SClaraPokeman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 298
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 9 Posts
For road bikes I feel that discs are a solution in search of a problem. I'm a big guy and rode in the the Santa Cruz mountains for 30 years and never felt my brakes lacked modulation or stopping power. Occasionally rims overheating could be a concern and I would pull off the road to let them cool. But that was pretty rare. The biggest advantage to discs from my experience is that they don't care what size tire you're running and they're self adjusting. Rim brakes are best up to 28m tires and require much more frequent adjustment for me. I don't like adding complexity to a bike and if I was in the market for a new road bike I would be willing continue going with rim brakes. A cross or mountain bike--yes definitely want discs. The worst brakes I had were cantilevers on a touring and mountain bike--maybe I'm not a good mechanic, but I could never get them tuned so they didn't howl and they provided lousy stopping power.
SClaraPokeman is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.