Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

So how easy or difficult is to repair a roadbike tire with those Co2 thingies?

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

So how easy or difficult is to repair a roadbike tire with those Co2 thingies?

Old 08-04-20, 01:41 AM
  #76  
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: Wellington
Posts: 32

Bikes: Specialist Roubaix 2016

Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Hi
There is always a lot of broken glass on my 16km commute. The first time I used a CO2 inflator was on the side of the 4-lane road in rush hour, in the rain and in the dark. I didn't feel the cartridge touching my finger, and now I have a deep cold burn. I had 3 punctures that day. I had to get picked up.

I now check my tyres each day. I have just super-glued five non-puncturing cuts in my front tyre.

I now carry two CO2 canisters and a hand pump.
Dazz

Last edited by dazz100; 08-04-20 at 01:46 AM.
dazz100 is offline  
Old 08-04-20, 09:05 AM
  #77  
Senior Member
 
Craptacular8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 648
Liked 38 Times in 32 Posts
I went for literally years, and thousands of miles with no flats. Then, I re-named myself Flatsalot....holy bejeebus, I've been forced to become quite familiar with all of my road-side flat kit, lol. On the bike I choose to tour on, along with it's all-around duties, I've always had a Topeak Road Master Blaster mounted as a frame pump. Love it. Carry a couple of other mini pumps on my other road bikes. The Rema Tour patch kit seems to work much better for me that the Park Tools. I have a couple of Park Tools patch kits in my various bags, have tried them, thought they would be the bomb, but they were not definitely not in the same league as the Rema in my experience. I've only got the fatty setup tubeless so far, and I can't imagine flatting on one of my -15 f or worse rides...thankfully, I've not ever had to find out. I'd be calling for a ride, and donning my oh ***** emergency wear I keep on the bike and walking otherwise. I can't imagine how if I had a failure at that time of year, that it would be resolved with anything other than a tube....and that would be brutal.
Craptacular8 is offline  
Old 08-04-20, 10:27 AM
  #78  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 10
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
That`s a great question, sir
Kittyklaw789 is offline  
Old 08-04-20, 10:59 AM
  #79  
Senior Member
 
woodcraft's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Nor Cal
Posts: 6,016
Likes: 0
Liked 923 Times in 569 Posts
Originally Posted by y2zipper
IMO using a frame pump is miserable.

I agree with all the recommendations for a CO2 inflator that has a control mechanism for the flow of air and is threaded so you screw it into the inflator head. That's exactly what I use and the pro tools ones that get sold on Amazon are pretty good.

I would recommend doing a rehearsal or 2 at home, and I would also advise that CO2 is only used for the purpose of getting home. On any ride where I use a CO2 canister to finish because I get a flat, the first thing that I do when I get home is I but all of the CO2 out of the tire that inflated with regular air again because CO2 is meant to sit in your bicycle tires like regular air is.

The total of what I take with me is two tubes to CO2 canisters and my inflator head in my inflator sleeve with tire levers and a multi-tool.




Using a 6" mini pump, such as I carry, is miserable.

A frame pump is hardly more work than a track pump- all I used for years at one time.


CO2 is at it's best for fast group rides, to minimize the collective impatience of a waiting group.
woodcraft is offline  
Old 08-04-20, 11:17 AM
  #80  
Junior Member
 
Grouperdawg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 77
Liked 20 Times in 14 Posts
Another rider had a flat today during my ride, it was the worst I’ve ever seen I rode back to my car and gave him a spare tire I had

Handed him my mini frumpa and he and his buddy ordered one in the parking lot after the ride. I’m done with co2
Grouperdawg is offline  
Old 08-04-20, 01:03 PM
  #81  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 6,432
Liked 44 Times in 38 Posts
Had a few times there was no practical way to fix things...
Had a 70's steel frame rust out (or the weld went back) at the bottom bracket...
Had a ulock refuse to unlock...
There's just a few things that a cell phone and uber/lyft/friends/family are the only decent options if you don't want to walk for miles looking for help.

What I do carry I want to be brain-dead simply and work, so I keep a minipump on each of my bikes - can't forget it, it doesn't run out air if I mess up using it, don't have to try to remember to replace spent cartridges at the end of the ride, it's as reliable as you can get. With a road morph mini I don't wear out my arms either as the end sits on the ground and I just push down. It's drawback is that it only gets the tire up to about 60psi but that's plenty to finish the ride and get home.

If I was one of those super fast guys trying to save 20 grams perhaps I'd use CO2, but I lean more towards things that are easy and reliable to use in my backup kit.
PaulRivers is offline  
Old 08-04-20, 01:18 PM
  #82  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 6,432
Liked 44 Times in 38 Posts
Originally Posted by John_V
After reading some of these posts, I'm interested in knowing if those of you that carry multiple tubes and a mini or frame pump also carry a patch kit with you? And if so, which type of patches do you carry? I'm asking because the peel and stick patches I've used (multiple brands) don't seem to hold well unless I use a hair dryer to heat them after they're applied. The glued patches I've used leak if I don't let the glue dry completely. So what do you guys do if you have a third flat because in that situation, neither a C02 system or pump won't do you any good if you don't carry patches with you as well. I carry one spare tube, two cartridges and several peel and stick patches. Luckily I hardly ever get a flat on my Gatorskins but it's good to know what other people are doing.
I carry the peel-and-stick patches...you can fit like 10 in the postage-stamp sized container...I almost never need them but when I do they work fine for the rest of the ride...then I replace the entire tube when I get home.
I gave up on the glue patches as the kit tended to be single use...the glue tube often glues itself shut after it's first use.
PaulRivers is offline  
Old 08-04-20, 06:59 PM
  #83  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Be aware that a CO2 filled tire will be flat in 12 to 24 hours. The CO2 dissolves through the rubber and the tire will need to be filled with air.
That makes sense now. I did a gravel ride back in February and got a flat on my rear tire. I used a CO2 cartridge for the first time and was able to fill the tire enough to finish the ride. A few days later, I noticed my back tire was completely flat again. I pumped it back up with air and it's been fine since. Now I know why. Thanks for sharing that.
Todd NC is offline  
Old 08-04-20, 07:11 PM
  #84  
On Your Left
 
GlennR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Long Island, New York, USA
Posts: 8,373

Bikes: Trek Emonda SLR, Sram eTap, Zipp 303

Liked 2,434 Times in 1,187 Posts
"Be aware that a CO2 filled tire will be flat in 12 to 24 hours. The CO2 dissolves through the rubber and the tire will need to be filled with air."
Not sure "dissolves" is the best term. The CO2 molecules and smaller and will pass through the rubber inner tube. It's like putting helium in a latex balloon, it will deflate faster than if you blow it up with your mouth,
GlennR is offline  
Old 08-04-20, 09:00 PM
  #85  
Senior Member
 
alcjphil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 6,124
Liked 1,799 Times in 1,049 Posts
Just to be clear: A CO2 cartridge does not repair a flat tire. All that it does is to inflate an already repaired or replaced inner tube. A pump will do the same job, albeit more slowly. The ease of flat repair does not solely depend on the method of inflation
alcjphil is offline  
Likes For alcjphil:
Old 08-05-20, 09:17 AM
  #86  
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 27,584

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Liked 4,419 Times in 2,465 Posts
Originally Posted by GlennR
"Be aware that a CO2 filled tire will be flat in 12 to 24 hours. The CO2 dissolves through the rubber and the tire will need to be filled with air."
Not sure "dissolves" is the best term. The CO2 molecules and smaller and will pass through the rubber inner tube. It's like putting helium in a latex balloon, it will deflate faster than if you blow it up with your mouth,
Yes, “dissolves” is the perfect term. Carbon dioxide molecules are not small. Nitrogen gas is slightly larger molecule but only just and it doesn’t pass through the rubber. Oxygen is a significantly smaller molecule than both and it doesn’t pass through rubber. Both diffuse thorough the rubber but they do so at a slower rate. Helium is a very small molecule so diffusion is faster.

However, carbon dioxide isn’t just “diffusing” through the rubber. This article explains the physical changes nicely, specifically this quote:

...absorbed CO2 may act on the molecular level as a lubricant (or plasticizer), reducing molecular interactions between polymer chain and allowing the molecules to move past each other more easily. This allows easier deformation on the macroscale (and so a reduction in stiffness). Secondly, the accumulation of CO2 can swell the volume of the structure, meaning that less polymer is present per macroscopic unit volume. Therefore, as there is less polymer material per unit volume to resist deformation, the structure is inherently less stiff and also more permeable to gases or liquids.
In a nut shell, the CO2 softens and swells the rubber by dissolving into the rubber, making it easier for the gas to pass through.

This is a really weird phenomena because we aren’t used to gases dissolving into solids. Most people can grasp liquid/liquid solutions because they use them all the time...sugar in coffee, salt in pasta water, etc. But we really don’t think of the other solutions that can happen like solids in solids (metal alloys are the best example) and gases in both liquids and solids.
__________________
Stuart Black
Plan Epsilon Around Lake Michigan in the era of Covid
Old School…When It Wasn’t Ancient bikepacking
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!




Last edited by cyccommute; 08-05-20 at 09:20 AM.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 08-05-20, 09:29 AM
  #87  
On Your Left
 
GlennR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Long Island, New York, USA
Posts: 8,373

Bikes: Trek Emonda SLR, Sram eTap, Zipp 303

Liked 2,434 Times in 1,187 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
Yes, “dissolves” is the perfect term. Carbon dioxide molecules are not small. Nitrogen gas is slightly larger molecule but only just and it doesn’t pass through the rubber. Oxygen is a significantly smaller molecule than both and it doesn’t pass through rubber. Both diffuse thorough the rubber but they do so at a slower rate. Helium is a very small molecule so diffusion is faster.

However, carbon dioxide isn’t just “diffusing” through the rubber. This article explains the physical changes nicely, specifically this quote:



In a nut shell, the CO2 softens and swells the rubber by dissolving into the rubber, making it easier for the gas to pass through.

This is a really weird phenomena because we aren’t used to gases dissolving into solids. Most people can grasp liquid/liquid solutions because they use them all the time...sugar in coffee, salt in pasta water, etc. But we really don’t think of the other solutions that can happen like solids in solids (metal alloys are the best example) and gases in both liquids and solids.
Does your brain hurt after you post something like this?
GlennR is offline  
Old 08-05-20, 09:34 AM
  #88  
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 27,584

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Liked 4,419 Times in 2,465 Posts
Originally Posted by GlennR
Does your brain hurt after you post something like this?
Nope. I’m a chemist and like teaching people about chemistry. I also like bikes and like to teach people about them as well. The Bike Forums is a great vehicle for teaching about both.
__________________
Stuart Black
Plan Epsilon Around Lake Michigan in the era of Covid
Old School…When It Wasn’t Ancient bikepacking
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!



cyccommute is offline  
Old 08-05-20, 09:42 AM
  #89  
Klaatu..Verata..Necktie?
 
genejockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 18,824

Bikes: Litespeed Ultimate, Ultegra; Canyon Endurace, 105; Battaglin MAX, Chorus; Bianchi 928 Veloce; Ritchey Road Logic, Dura Ace; Cannondale R500 RX100; Schwinn Circuit, Sante; Lotus Supreme, Dura Ace

Liked 12,678 Times in 6,508 Posts
Originally Posted by woodcraft
Using a 6" mini pump, such as I carry, is miserable.

A frame pump is hardly more work than a track pump- all I used for years at one time.


CO2 is at it's best for fast group rides, to minimize the collective impatience of a waiting group.
The club I used to ride with had a pair of older Italian guys. Once I flatted on a group ride and before I knew it, these two were acting as pit crew. Fastest tube change I've ever seen
__________________
"Don't take life so serious-it ain't nohow permanent."

"Everybody's gotta be somewhere." - Eccles
genejockey is online now  
Old 08-05-20, 11:01 AM
  #90  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 3,550
Liked 2,377 Times in 1,332 Posts
I got my first flat in a while. I was riding on Sunday and went to accelerate and squishy feeling in front. I have never used a CO2 thingy but now I am considering it. Changing tubes or patching is no big deal but pumping the tire with a frame pump in hot weather was not fun. I got so sweaty I had to ride fast to cool down!
Kabuki12 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.