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Frame Material Preference Poll

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View Poll Results: Frame Material Preference
Carbon Fiber
39
30.71%
Aluminum
10
7.87%
Steel
61
48.03%
Titanium
17
13.39%
Voters: 127. You may not vote on this poll

Frame Material Preference Poll

Old 11-10-22, 12:06 PM
  #26  
phughes
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I was wondering where that concept of heavy touring came from.

The comment was made to illustrate the point that the OP did not specify the type of frame they are looking for, or the intended purpose of said frame. Without that criteria, there is no way anyone can answer the question. In other words, it is a garbage pole with no chance of compiling any accurate results. It is completely pointless without knowing the frame's intended use.
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Old 11-10-22, 12:09 PM
  #27  
GamblerGORD53
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Building a very low maintenance ultra fast super commuter

Here. Read these 6 pages. This guy got titanium, Alfine11 with hydo disc brakes and belt drive.
Lots of discussion about my fave drum brakes.

Hey, Bob .... IF and when I see anybody going 20 miles with a 5 lb grocery bag on both sides of a CF racer handlebar, then I'll consider them not useless. LOL.

Last edited by GamblerGORD53; 11-10-22 at 12:19 PM.
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Old 11-10-22, 12:11 PM
  #28  
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I think frame materials are great especially ones that can build a frame that does what you want it to do. Some frames are made of different materials so you can have a choice of materials and frames. If you like frame materials you should get a frame built from those materials so you can ride it. Riding on frames made of materials is the best : )
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Old 11-10-22, 12:39 PM
  #29  
Eric F
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Of the 7 bikes currently in my stable. 5 are CF, 1 is steel, and 1 is aluminum. Of those, the bikes I ride most are CF, largely because they are the newest, lightest, and excite me the most.

What I have suits the way I ride, and my personal preferences, which may not be anything like your preferences and the way you ride.
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Old 11-10-22, 01:27 PM
  #30  
CliffordK
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Originally Posted by phughes View Post
The comment was made to illustrate the point that the OP did not specify the type of frame they are looking for, or the intended purpose of said frame. Without that criteria, there is no way anyone can answer the question. In other words, it is a garbage pole with no chance of compiling any accurate results. It is completely pointless without knowing the frame's intended use.
This was posted in the General Forum. So, yes, it covers just about everything.

Had it been put in a specific subforum, then it would have led the answers better.
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Old 11-10-22, 03:53 PM
  #31  
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Steel. For aesthetic reasons mostly, but affordability (vs CF) and other reasons too.
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Old 11-10-22, 04:33 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by 1989Pre View Post
It depends on the type of riding and a couple dozen other factors.
That's what I like most about my steel frames. They're suitable for any type of riding. Gravel riding, longer distance road riding, singletrack and mountain bike trails, bikepacking, loaded touring, commuting and utility riding, recreational riding, steel frames can do it all and they are a lot more durable than carbon or aluminum.
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Old 11-10-22, 05:21 PM
  #33  
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You didn't say what kind of bike the frame material was for. If a road bike, I have had all sorts of frame material, and steel was the best, and I still have several steel bikes. That was until I got a titanium bike, that bike rides like it's on air...fine, not like it's on air but it is noticeably smoother than steel.

But it does depend on how the bike is going to be used. In 2019 I bought a steel touring bike, why steel if I love TI so much? due to cost for one, but when a steel touring bike is loaded up, along with its larger tires, it rides very smoothly, so there is no need to go with a TI touring bike.

If you're going to be racing a road bike above CAT 3 you probably want a CF bike because it's lighter and responsive, but having said that if you're going to be road racing CAT 3 or below, I would only use an aluminum frame bike because crashes happen a lot in racing, and more so in the beginning categories, and an AL frame is a lot less expensive to replace vs a CF frame. Also, above CAT 3 levels you usually get at least a huge discount on bikes, but most of the time you will get a free bike, so a CF bike is the way to go then.

Let me clear the air because I know how people get when it comes to frames, these are just my thoughts, nothing political going on with my response.
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Old 11-10-22, 05:25 PM
  #34  
livedarklions
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I carved my frame from a big block of soap.
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Old 11-10-22, 05:56 PM
  #35  
phughes
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
I carved my frame from a big block of soap.
Self cleaning?
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Old 11-10-22, 07:35 PM
  #36  
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Best in a cool, dry climate I'd guess.
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Old 11-10-22, 07:42 PM
  #37  
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It depends on what you already own. If you have the itch then buy a frame material you don't currently have to try it out they all have their pros and cons.
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Old 11-10-22, 07:56 PM
  #38  
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I've ridden all four types and I found neither made me more or less comfortable riding on the beat-up streets of LA, so I stick with brazed steel bikes because I like how they look.
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Old 11-10-22, 08:00 PM
  #39  
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My favorite bike ATM is a 32 lbs Al 29er with a chromoly fork.
This has more to do with it being a flatbar upright and very comfortable since my last crash that aggravated rotator cuff injuries.

My favorite bike before that was an 853 steel crit bike I crashed on (great ride quality).
My favorite bike before that was a fully carbon dropbar endurance bike (light/responsive).

It is the sum of the components, frame/fork materials, and fit with me and current injury status that decides my preferences.
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Old 11-10-22, 08:03 PM
  #40  
SpedFast
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
I carved my frame from a big block of soap.
Now why didn't I think of that..... hmmm
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Old 11-10-22, 08:22 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by phughes View Post
Then give us a hint. What kind of frame are you looking for? What will it be used for? Is it a bent? Is it a BMX bike? Will it be bigger than a breadbox?
I've been doing so much research into frame materials that I actually forgot why I was looking in the first place, sorry. I'm looking for the holy grail of bikes. In other words, the single one that says, "Hey, you don't need those others." And that would make my DW very happy. She encourages me (I'm 73 btw) to do good in the neighborhood which is why I fix other people's bikes, cars, trailers, and whatever is needed. But she is now encouraging me to begin downsizing the herd. I'm looking for an endurance style bike that I can put full fenders on in the winter, ride strictly roads/mups. Don't need to fit anything wider than 28mm tires. And last, but definitely not least, not weigh as much as the iron I currently own. I've already donated several bikes to the local charity and I still have 2 sheds full. (They're small sheds) I need to get down to one though so the DW can have the other for a potting shed. My fave right now is an aluminum with carbon fork, but it's a racing geometry and after 30 miles I feel done in but love the speed and quickness of it. My second fave is vintage steel and so comfortable I can go all day on it, just much slower. I contemplated upgrading it to brifters and 700c wheels a while back, but that won't make it any lighter. The other's in the stable are mostly alloys with low end components that I never ride anymore. Carbon was my first choice, but then I started thinking maybe titanium. However, like I said earlier, my current fave is alum, so maybe just find an alum endurance bike with drop bars. Lots of nice ones out there. Too many options really. Just thought I would filter through what others thought and why. Thanks for all the input. Smokey
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Old 11-10-22, 08:29 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Attilio View Post
It depends on what you already own. If you have the itch then buy a frame material you don't currently have to try it out they all have their pros and cons.
I don't currently have a full carbon or a titanium, so maybe I need 2 more bikes is what you're saying? haha Oh yeah, the DW will be pulling out those divorce papers by morning haha. She would rather I buy another Harley than another pedal bike, but I've convinced her that I am working toward getting down to just one, and she's happy about that, so I better follow through. Huh?
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Old 11-10-22, 08:30 PM
  #43  
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Perhaps we should reframe the question. What would be the best frame material for a sub 700 gram frame? What. Would be the most comfortable endurance bike sub 1,000 grams. What is the most durable 2,000 gram frame set. In reality carbon would be superior in each category. Tell me any material other than carbon which could hit sub 700 grams remain reliable at mass market pricing. How about comfort, no way any titanium frame is as comfortable as a Roubaix or Domane. Carbons amazing weight to strength ratio as well as total flexibility regarding layup means it is unbeatable in any cycling related arena.
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Old 11-10-22, 08:38 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
Perhaps we should reframe the question. What would be the best frame material for a sub 700 gram frame? What. Would be the most comfortable endurance bike sub 1,000 grams. What is the most durable 2,000 gram frame set. In reality carbon would be superior in each category. Tell me any material other than carbon which could hit sub 700 grams remain reliable at mass market pricing. How about comfort, no way any titanium frame is as comfortable as a Roubaix or Domane. Carbons amazing weight to strength ratio as well as total flexibility regarding layup means it is unbeatable in any cycling related arena.
Now that's the kind of argument I was looking for. Thank you. So far I am leaning in the direction of carbon since I'm not even looking at steel. I just know there are a lot of steel disciples out there. But I haven't ruled out alum or titanium yet either.
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Old 11-10-22, 09:10 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by GamblerGORD53 View Post
Building a very low maintenance ultra fast super commuter

Here. Read these 6 pages. This guy got titanium, Alfine11 with hydo disc brakes and belt drive.
Lots of discussion about my fave drum brakes.

Hey, Bob .... IF and when I see anybody going 20 miles with a 5 lb grocery bag on both sides of a CF racer handlebar, then I'll consider them not useless. LOL.
You're always so dogmatic and hard-ass about this stuff. Lots of people enjoy riding CF bikes, racing, fun rides, and even touring. A group of us did a 6 day tour and one of the CF bikes towed a B.O.B. trailer and 3 of the others used seat post racks with panniers and even backpacks.

I ride with 2 road clubs. 500 members in one and about half that in the other. The vast majority of the members ride CF bikes. Never seen drum brakes except on tandems. Don't recall ever seeing an IGH. edit: I remembered there was a guy with an IGH on an old Trek CF bike a few weeks ago. He also had flat bars and he passed me on a 3 mile climb. He was about 70 pounds lighter than I am, I'm guessing.

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Old 11-10-22, 09:19 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by SpedFast View Post
Now that's the kind of argument I was looking for. Thank you. So far I am leaning in the direction of carbon since I'm not even looking at steel. I just know there are a lot of steel disciples out there. But I haven't ruled out alum or titanium yet either.
Titanium frames can ride soft or harsh. I have a Seven which is on the harsh side. I've put over 50K miles on it and it is durable but it feels like a CAAD5 I used to have.
I rode a friend's Moots Vamoots and it felt like a spring compared to my Seven.
I've had a number of steel frames and still have one. Steel can be extremely harsh or very soft. I have broken 3 steel frames.
The only full CF bike I've had is my mtb.
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Old 11-10-22, 09:38 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
Perhaps we should reframe the question. What would be the best frame material for a sub 700 gram frame? What. Would be the most comfortable endurance bike sub 1,000 grams. What is the most durable 2,000 gram frame set. In reality carbon would be superior in each category. Tell me any material other than carbon which could hit sub 700 grams remain reliable at mass market pricing. How about comfort, no way any titanium frame is as comfortable as a Roubaix or Domane. Carbons amazing weight to strength ratio as well as total flexibility regarding layup means it is unbeatable in any cycling related arena.
Probably true, except when one desires a custom-built frame. (But very few riders truly need a custom frame for anything other than novelty or vanity.)
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Old 11-11-22, 04:51 AM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
Probably true, except when one desires a custom-built frame. (But very few riders truly need a custom frame for anything other than novelty or vanity.)
You can have a custom built carbon frame too. I've noticed the "boutique" market is inevitably heading in that direction at the top end.
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Old 11-11-22, 04:55 AM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
That's what I like most about my steel frames. They're suitable for any type of riding. Gravel riding, longer distance road riding, singletrack and mountain bike trails, bikepacking, loaded touring, commuting and utility riding, recreational riding, steel frames can do it all and they are a lot more durable than carbon or aluminum.
I would put good money on it that you have never even ridden a carbon bike (or probably anything else other steel). You don't even appear to have discovered gears yet.
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Old 11-11-22, 07:12 AM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
I would put good money on it that you have never even ridden a carbon bike (or probably anything else other steel). You don't even appear to have discovered gears yet.

I have no desire to try carbon because I believe it's inferior to steel it terms of toughness and durability. And I also have an old aluminum MTB with a rigid steel fork which is holding up great after many years of hard riding. The only issue with aluminum frame is a bit of galvanic corrosion on the lower chainstay bridge and that is the result of road salt corroding a steel bolt and reacting with aluminum. My steel frames had rustroofing oil sprayed inside tubes and there is no rust even after many years of winter riding.
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