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Frame Material Preference Poll

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View Poll Results: Frame Material Preference
Carbon Fiber
39
30.71%
Aluminum
10
7.87%
Steel
61
48.03%
Titanium
17
13.39%
Voters: 127. You may not vote on this poll

Frame Material Preference Poll

Old 11-14-22, 12:30 PM
  #176  
Vinnems
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
There is the possiblity of a new frame material coming onto the market, hopefully sooner rather than later, but it's called simply super magnesium, which is made better than magnesium that use to be used in a few custom frames. https://insights.globalspec.com/arti...or-bike-frames

https://www.handbuiltbicyclenews.com...next-big-thing

There is also a new higher strength aluminum allow that could also break into the market.

How will this Super Mag, and higher strength AL compare with other frame materials we already have remains to be seen.
Neat article. I work in aerospace and many materials have come a long way. I see carbon fiber now used in applications that 10 years ago I thought would be impossible!
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Old 11-14-22, 01:50 PM
  #177  
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There is only one real frame material. The others are beer cans, fishing poles and pig iron.
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Old 11-14-22, 02:21 PM
  #178  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
Ah, yes, the semi-mythical stories about people getting local welders in Timbuktu to repair their steel-framed touring bikes as they heroically pedal around the world. Right. Tell you what: you go get a quote on having a top tube replaced (so, old tube removed, new tube welded or brazed in, including the cost of the tube itself), and don't forget the new paint job. I'll bet it comes to more than the cost of my friend's cf top tube repair, which was under $300.
On my megameter ride, I had a steel (solid bars) bike rack that broke. I got it welded up in a small shop half way between Pistoia, and the Abetone pass. The weld lasted maybe 100 km, and broke again just before I got to the end of the ride. But it was good enough to get me home.

In an emergency, one could likely get a steel bike welded. It would depend on where it is, and whether it is welded with MIG, TIG, or Stick. It might get a person back on the road, but would functionally destroy the bike for long term use.

Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
I think it is correct. This is the reason that people who tour on bicycle chose steel because it's the only material that even a person with a simple welder can repair, be it anywhere in the world, you won't see that happening with any other frame material, especially CF or TI. Even in the US you still have to send the CF somewhere for the repair, whereas a local person could fix a steel bike.
Thin steel is a different beast than welding thick steel. Ir could be difficult to get a functional weld with crude equipment.

As far as a broken carbon fiber bike. I'd probably find the nearest auto shop and buy a roll of fiberglass and some epoxy. It might not look pretty, but depending on what broke, it could probably get the bike back on the road.

If one can't find fiberglass and epoxy, then one likely isn't finding someone that can TIG weld or is very good with brazing.
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Old 11-14-22, 02:24 PM
  #179  
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Thin steel is a different beast than welding thick steel. Ir could be difficult to get a functional weld with crude equipment.
Let's also remember that many bike frames come with long (sometimes lifetime) warranties. I can't think of a better way to ruin your warranty claim than by having a third party take a welding torch to your frame.
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Old 11-14-22, 02:49 PM
  #180  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
Let's also remember that many bike frames come with long (sometimes lifetime) warranties. I can't think of a better way to ruin your warranty claim than by having a third party take a welding torch to your frame.
True,

But if you're in the middle of the Amazon jungle, perhaps vampire bats are a greater concern than warranty coverage. And one may not choose to haul a broken frame that can't be ridden out of the jungle.

But, if the bike is ridden around home, then by all means, contact the manufacturer before going all MacGyver on it.
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Old 11-14-22, 03:41 PM
  #181  
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
There is only one real frame material. The others are beer cans, fishing poles and pig iron.
Bamboo is real!
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Old 11-14-22, 04:06 PM
  #182  
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
There is only one real frame material. The others are beer cans, fishing poles and pig iron.
The Original Plastic Bike!

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Old 11-14-22, 04:17 PM
  #183  
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Originally Posted by livedarklions View Post
With 48.35% of the vote, it is clear that steel has a mandate to form a new government, which it can do by entering into a coalition with either titanium or aluminum.
Titanium being the more natural partner, but you never know.
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Old 11-14-22, 06:05 PM
  #184  
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Originally Posted by Eric F View Post
I can tell just by looking at that bike, and I'm assuming you're referring to the top center of the post, that the gearing will be much too low. Also, the handlebars are all wrong. It needs drop bars and brifters with at least a sub-compact gearing. Other than that, I like the color..
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Old 11-14-22, 06:15 PM
  #185  
Eric F
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Originally Posted by SpedFast View Post
I can tell just by looking at that bike, and I'm assuming you're referring to the top center of the post, that the gearing will be much too low. Also, the handlebars are all wrong. It needs drop bars and brifters with at least a sub-compact gearing. Other than that, I like the color..
Just throwing something unusual out there. That may be the hottest "townie" bike I've ever seen.

If you're buying a "final" bike for yourself, no one else's opinion matters (not that it matters on any other bike). If you dig CF, get CF. If you prefer steel, aluminum, ti, bamboo, or shaved soap, get that. Make sure it has room for the kind of tires you want to run, is geared the way that suits your needs, and is kitted out with all of the best parts that fit within your budget. Build the bike that excites you every time you see it, and makes you want to jump on and ride every chance you get. It seems like you know what you want. Just go do it.
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Old 11-14-22, 08:23 PM
  #186  
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Originally Posted by jgwilliams View Post
I smashed my clavicle and now have a titanium Stryker plate screwed to it.
Should have went with carbon, imagine how compliant you’d be AND lighter.
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Old 11-15-22, 03:35 AM
  #187  
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Originally Posted by digger View Post
Should have went with carbon, imagine how compliant you’d be AND lighter.
Lol! Yes, the thought had occurred. On the other hand, everyone tells me that titanium is for life!
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Old 11-15-22, 08:09 AM
  #188  
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Originally Posted by jgwilliams View Post
On the other hand, everyone tells me that titanium is for life!
That's one reason I went with ti for the permanent screw in my thumb. That and because I have the super fly, custom ti bike. Maybe I will post a photo of it one day.
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Old 11-15-22, 08:19 AM
  #189  
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
That's one reason I went with ti for the permanent screw in my thumb. That and because I have the super fly, custom ti bike. Maybe I will post a photo of it one day.
What!? You have a ti bike? I had no idea!
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Old 11-15-22, 08:21 AM
  #190  
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Their stuff is proof positive that ti can be the shiznit:

No. 22 Bicycle Company | Handmade Titanium Bikes (22bicycles.com)
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Old 11-15-22, 10:04 AM
  #191  
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You don't need the most expensive TI bike to get the exact same TI ride, or durability you can get for the lowest price one that Lynskey or Litespeed offers.

I even have titanium rods and screws in my back, no stainless or cromoly steel screws and rods, no aluminum screws and rods, no carbon fiber screws and rods, no magnesium screws and rods, titanium all the way, the stuff made me about a 1/4 of inch taller too.
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Old 11-15-22, 11:08 AM
  #192  
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Their stuff is proof positive that ti can be the shiznit:

No. 22 Bicycle Company | Handmade Titanium Bikes (22bicycles.com)
And just when I had myself convinced that CF was in my future, you had to throw that into the mix!!! They build some damn sweet bikes for sure.
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Old 11-15-22, 03:12 PM
  #193  
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Originally Posted by Trakhak View Post
The Original Plastic Bike!

I will have to check, but I think that it never really existed past a prototype/mockup.
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Old 11-15-22, 11:43 PM
  #194  
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Originally Posted by Lombard View Post

Did you know that:

  • Aluminum frames have a harsh ride?
  • Titanium frames are soft and whippy?
  • Steel frames go soft with age, but they have a nicer ride quality?
  • England's Queen Elizabeth King Charles III Queen Victoria was a kingpin of the international drug trade?
3 of the above statements are false.
fify
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Old 11-16-22, 12:02 PM
  #195  
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Originally Posted by SpedFast View Post
And just when I had myself convinced that CF was in my future, you had to throw that into the mix!!! They build some damn sweet bikes for sure.
Considering the fork, bars, stem, wheels, seat post, and saddle rails are all carbon not sure how much titanium we are talking about here.
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Old 11-16-22, 12:15 PM
  #196  
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
Considering the fork, bars, stem, wheels, seat post, and saddle rails are all carbon not sure how much titanium we are talking about here.
I don't believe they sell complete bikes, but rather only frames and a few accessories like ti cages and seat posts. The rest is up to the purchaser.

I like the Cerakote option. There is a forum member who has a custom ti frame with Cerakote.
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Old 11-17-22, 04:22 AM
  #197  
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Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
I don't believe they sell complete bikes, but rather only frames and a few accessories like ti cages and seat posts. The rest is up to the purchaser.

I like the Cerakote option. There is a forum member who has a custom ti frame with Cerakote.
Their range topping Aurora frame has a complete carbon seat mast/downtube. So clearly they couldn't make that work quite as well using a titanium tube.

Marketing blurb:-

"A top priority when developing the Aurora was to balance high stiffness and crisp handling with all-day comfort levels that only titanium can deliver. Despite an overall stiffness level approaching our race-specific Reactor model, the Aurora is the smoothest riding frame we offer. A combination of carefully shaped and butted tubing, svelte seat stays and the one-piece carbon seat mast result in a frame that smooths vibration like nothing else on the road."

It's hardly surprising that an artisan company with a long history of titanium fabrication would take this path, but even they have realised that you need carbon to achieve the best result. I would put good money on it that this bike is objectively slower, heavier and no more comfortable than a full carbon alternative. Obviously that would be missing the whole point of a bike like this (art decor piece for the discerning gentleman), but in the cold light of performance this bike is not going to compete against top tier carbon equivalents in any objective way. The use of titanium here is entirely down to aesthetics, nostalgia and of course their company skill set. Let's not pretend that anyone would actually race this in preference to a pro-level carbon frameset.
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Old 11-17-22, 11:03 AM
  #198  
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Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Their range topping Aurora frame has a complete carbon seat mast/downtube. So clearly they couldn't make that work quite as well using a titanium tube.

Marketing blurb:-

"A top priority when developing the Aurora was to balance high stiffness and crisp handling with all-day comfort levels that only titanium can deliver. Despite an overall stiffness level approaching our race-specific Reactor model, the Aurora is the smoothest riding frame we offer. A combination of carefully shaped and butted tubing, svelte seat stays and the one-piece carbon seat mast result in a frame that smooths vibration like nothing else on the road."

It's hardly surprising that an artisan company with a long history of titanium fabrication would take this path, but even they have realised that you need carbon to achieve the best result. I would put good money on it that this bike is objectively slower, heavier and no more comfortable than a full carbon alternative. Obviously that would be missing the whole point of a bike like this (art decor piece for the discerning gentleman), but in the cold light of performance this bike is not going to compete against top tier carbon equivalents in any objective way. The use of titanium here is entirely down to aesthetics, nostalgia and of course their company skill set. Let's not pretend that anyone would actually race this in preference to a pro-level carbon frameset.
It is amusing observing traditional titanium frame manufacturers contort themselves attempting to remain relevant as composite technologies have passed them by. The latest Moots CRD, for example, mentions ride quality however, with carbon wheels, seat post, stem, handlebars, and even seat rails, how much influence does the frame material have in that case? Cant market tradition anymore since the CRD is a disc brake, electronic shifting-only bike. Weight is not even listed, and we know why because it is probably double the weight of a mass-produced S Works Aethos.
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Old 12-30-22, 04:20 PM
  #199  
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Originally Posted by SpedFast View Post
You must be young. If I'm still riding in 10yrs it will be a miracle. So whatever I buy is more than likely going to be my forever bike haha. This is why I need to make sure I get it right and have resorted to the poll and other rider's opinions. I'm covering all bases and hoping to get it right the first time (last time) Smokey
In my mid 40's I am younger than the mountains but older than the trees so to speak. Old enough to have made "forever" XYZ mistakes, spent more than I should have on something that a few years later I realized I had changed, or my objectives changed and was no longer relevant or useful. Now I don't get that attached to things and avoid putting my eggs in one basket accordingly because everything changes from me to industry standard to everything else. Helps roll with the punches a bit better.
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Old 12-30-22, 05:21 PM
  #200  
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
It is amusing observing traditional titanium frame manufacturers contort themselves attempting to remain relevant as composite technologies have passed them by. The latest Moots CRD, for example, mentions ride quality however, with carbon wheels, seat post, stem, handlebars, and even seat rails, how much influence does the frame material have in that case? Cant market tradition anymore since the CRD is a disc brake, electronic shifting-only bike. Weight is not even listed, and we know why because it is probably double the weight of a mass-produced S Works Aethos.
This is just my experience, yours may differ.

I've only ever ridden 3 TI bikes in my 40 plus years of riding a bike, one of those belonged to a friend of mine, a low price Motobecane he got from Bikes Direct, so I rode it a bunch of times to figure if TI was a worthwhile investment; the other I rode once was a Serotta, can't recall the model, but in the meantime I was test riding a lot of CF bikes.

I had a scandium bike but hated the harsh ride, coming off of steel bikes it was more than noticable the ride was harsh then any of my steel bikes.

When I first rode the TI, yes it/they had a CF fork of course, but the ride quality was indeed better than my steel bikes, by a little but noticeable, but very noticeable over a CF bike. The odd thing about the CF bikes I test rode was that over smooth roads they did ride very smoothly, more so than any bike I have ever been on except for the TI bikes, then they were about the same. But where I live we get a freeze and thaw cycle that tears up roads, and on harsh roads the TI bikes were more comfortable than the CF, the CF would bang across rough roads, the TI bikes did not transmit the banging near as much as the CF. I tried to buy the Motobecane due to the price but they were out of stock over a year and half, in the meantime Lynskey had a closeout sale on the Peloton model so I bought it without ever test riding it, and love the ride on my first ride with it; the Peloton is not a racing geometry bike, closer to the old school sport geometry, so that also makes it comfortable, the Motobecane was more of a racing geometry.

TI bikes with 25c tires ride a lot like steel touring bikes that I had/have with 32 or 38c tires that are loaded, in terms of comfort riding on the road. But I find the TI bike very responsive, not quite as much as a CF bike, more like a steel bike, but you give up a tad of responsiveness to gain a tad more comfort. Of course my comparisons are limited, I haven't rode a bunch of different TI bikes so I can't say if a Moots or whatever brand is better or worse.

Here are my thoughts, if you're going to be racing then buy either an aluminum racing bike if your on a tight budget, or a CF bike if money is no object; but if you're not racing and you want more comfort instead than I say TI or steel bikes, but if weight is a concern then the TI bike weighs about as much as CF and lightweight aluminum bikes weigh, if you want both comfort and lightweightness.

I'm not going to respond to what I've said because some people get pretty intense over this sort of stuff, why I don't know, so to keep any bad vibes from happening I will bow out of all conversations over this stuff, take it or leave it. I will answer questions, but I will not respond to negative comments bashing anything that I said, it's all just my opinion based on my personal experiences and nothing more.
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