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Transporting a guitar

Old 12-16-22, 04:01 AM
  #26  
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Wow, that seems to have stimulated quite a discussion - very little of it on trailers.

I used to transport it on a child trailer when my daughter was young - towing it behind a HP Velotechnic Grasshopper recumbent bike. It caused quite a few comments. That would probably be the cheapest option, but not ideal. I looked at the BOB Yak trailer, which looks excellent; there still seem to be new ones for sale over here, so if they've been discontinued presumably that's quite recent. It looks good but they're pretty costly. Worth thinking about though. I'll look at backpack options too, but of course that would mean I'd also have to find some way to carry all my music. Plus, if we had a trailer, I'm sure we'd find lots of other uses beyond just going to and from church with a guitar.

As for the guitar itself, I'm not totally sure how old it is as I bought it second-hand, though I'm sure I could find out. My guess is that it was made in the 70's, which pretty much makes it vintage in my books. I do know it's full history, though. It might not be what I would have bought if I could afford a new guitar of that value, but I like the sound and it serves me well. There's no sign of the neck breaking or the back falling off (it appears to be more fibre-glass than pure plastic) or the wood delaminating or any other disaster overtaking it.
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Old 12-16-22, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Trakhak
Best of luck to the OP in solving the guitar transportation problem. (Although it is only 1 mile to the church. Roller blades, guitar in one hand?)

Now - back to the digression.

I won't hear anything against my early '60s Sears Silvertone dolphin-nose model 1440 bass - equipped with one lipstick pickup and constructed of the finest virgin Masonite. It looks just like the simple drawings of guitars that were once featured in Yellow Pages ads for clubs with Live Music!, along with tilted champagne glasses.

Did You Know: Danelectro six-string basses (also marketed with the Sears Silvertone label) were used extensively in country music recording sessions in the '50s into the '60s, providing the "tic-tac" definition needed to make upright basses audible in tinny car radio speakers.

One more: after Leo Fender learned that Danelectro basses were being used that way, he and his designers came up with a much fancier version, a prototype of which he presented to session guitarist Harold Bradley for use in Bradley's Barn, the recording studio run by Harold's brother Owen.

Harold brought it to the next recording session. About a minute into the session, Owen stopped the tape and asked, "What's that you're playing?" Harold said proudly, "My new Fender Bass VI!" Owen said, "Get the other one."
True, those Silvertone electrics are still sought after. My Silvertone was an acoustic and not sure of the wood material. It served its purpose for a 10 year old. boy.
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Old 12-16-22, 07:27 AM
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One-mile ride, light but bulky load?

Burley Travoy.

Here's one with a cello:
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Old 12-16-22, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by jgwilliams
I'll look at backpack options too, but of course that would mean I'd also have to find some way to carry all my music.
I've carried a guitar in a gigbag backpack on my bike many times, and while it works, the downside is that the neck of the guitar sits directly behind your head. This tends to make you lower your head, impairing your forward vision a bit, and it can be a little uncomfortable if you're wearing a helmet. Not a big deal for a short trip or if your riding position is bolt upright, but I was never tempted to extend my route on the days I carried it. I was able to fit a binder into the external pocket of the gigbag.
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Old 12-16-22, 11:36 AM
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If I were the OP I would 100% use this as an excuse to either buy a cargo bike, or buy another guitar.

Maybe both, just to be safe.
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Old 12-16-22, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by rollagain
Switch to ukelele?
I've taken a carbon fiber tenor ukulele in a gig bag on an aluminum frame bike.

I'm not sure if the intent is to eliminate your car some day, or let it sit for months without starting it up. If you are going to get rid of the car, then a nice trailer that can be used for multiple purposes and would probably be worth the investment.

If you are going to keep the car, then running it once a week might be better.

John
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Old 12-16-22, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by 70sSanO
If you are going to get rid of the car, then a nice trailer that can be used for multiple purposes and would probably be worth the investment.
I'd take a cargo bike over a trailer any day. Bonus points if it's got a motor.
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Old 12-17-22, 02:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Herzlos
Any child trailer should allow you to strap it in largely upright, so it doesn't overhang the trailer.

But as zaje mentioned, carrying the guitar with a backpack case/bag will make your life a lot easier whether you and cycling or walking.

Alternatively, can you just leave a guitar there for practice?
Guitars, like bikes, adhere to the N+1 rule: buy a second guitar to leave a the church! (or leave the new one at home)
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Old 12-17-22, 08:39 AM
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Guitar on Bike.

Originally Posted by jgwilliams
I was thinking the other day that about the only time I take the car out for a short journey these days is when I have to go down to the church when I'm playing in the band or for practice. We live about a mile away and I have a vintage Ovation guitar with a very solid case, and the combination is just too heavy for me to walk with it for that distance. So I was wondering about buying a cargo trailer, ideally to tow behind the Brompton if that will work, but I've got several bikes to choose from. A guitar is rather longer than the sort of package you normally put on a cargo trailer, though. Does anyone have experience of doing this, or any suggestions for a trailer that will work?

Thanks.
I remembered a bit with Arlo carrying one while riding a momo choochoo. IIRC, he just slung it over his shoulder, hanging by the guitar strap.

And in a "same thing only different" there's this.

Saul
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Old 12-17-22, 08:56 AM
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Could you ride no handed and play and sing while riding?
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Old 12-18-22, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by jgwilliams
I was thinking the other day that about the only time I take the car out for a short journey these days is when I have to go down to the church when I'm playing in the band or for practice. We live about a mile away and I have a vintage Ovation guitar with a very solid case, and the combination is just too heavy for me to walk with it for that distance. So I was wondering about buying a cargo trailer, ideally to tow behind the Brompton if that will work, but I've got several bikes to choose from. A guitar is rather longer than the sort of package you normally put on a cargo trailer, though. Does anyone have experience of doing this, or any suggestions for a trailer that will work?

Thanks.
I know a guy that carries his guitar in a soft back pack type of case. But he uses a 1\2 size guitar or a 3\4 size guitar when he travels to gigs.
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Old 12-18-22, 07:44 PM
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For milder weather, as others have suggested, a gig bag with backpacking straps But in colder temps, and extremes in humidity (high or low), I'd be using a motor vehicle to avoid damaging the guitar. None of my guitars (all electric) are super expensive, but they aren't cheap, and I try to keep humidity and temp within a certain range in the room in which they're kept, or if going out with them this time of year, it's in a car.. The distance you're traveling may not be much, but still better to take care.
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Old 12-19-22, 12:36 AM
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Mundo AirPannier
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Old 12-19-22, 03:01 AM
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Originally Posted by 70sSanO
I'm not sure if the intent is to eliminate your car some day, or let it sit for months without starting it up. If you are going to get rid of the car, then a nice trailer that can be used for multiple purposes and would probably be worth the investment.

If you are going to keep the car, then running it once a week might be better.

John
No, we couldn't do without a car, but using it for short journeys is not good for the car or the environment. I was thinking about the fact that this is one of the very few short journeys I do by car, that's all.

Some great suggestions, thanks.
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Old 12-24-22, 09:43 PM
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A mile?
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Old 12-29-22, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by 50PlusCycling
A mile?
I would not like to carry a guitar by hand in a heavy case for a mile, especially if I was expected to play it afterwards.

Full-size guitar felt too awkward for bike backpack, so I bought a very nice 3/4 steel-string which feels good in a soft case on my back when riding.
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Old 12-29-22, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by fredlord
I would not like to carry a guitar by hand in a heavy case for a mile, especially if I was expected to play it afterwards.

Full-size guitar felt too awkward for bike backpack, so I bought a very nice 3/4 steel-string which feels good in a soft case on my back when riding.
I take a weekly guitar lesson in Tokyo, the teacher lives in Akasaka. So every Wednesday I carry my guitar to the class on foot. I have a D28, which was expensive, so I carry it in its original hard case. My uncle was a folk musician who traveled America with a guitar (you may have heard of him, his guitar had a sticker on it which said “This Machine Kills Fascists”). He bummed rides on highways, hopped freight trains, and walked a lot of miles with his guitar.
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Old 01-02-23, 03:03 PM
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Yeah, after carrying a a guitar in my hand for a while I also would only be able to play a few simple chords.
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Old 01-03-23, 02:43 AM
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Why would you be carrying it with the weight on your hand rather than over your shoulder?
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