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700C Tires and 29"

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700C Tires and 29"

Old 04-12-24, 05:08 PM
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700C Tires and 29"

I am still trying to figure out bike tire sizing. My new bike will come with a 29" wheel and a wide chunky tread which I will refit with a more road-friendly tire like the 28x1.5 Marathon Plus Tour. What I have read is that any 700 tires will fit on a 29 as long as the width falls with the wheel tolerance
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Old 04-12-24, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by MikeDeason
I am still trying to figure out bike tire sizing. My new bike will come with a 29" wheel and a wide chunky tread which I will refit with a more road-friendly tire like the 28x1.5 Marathon Plus Tour. What I have read is that any 700 tires will fit on a 29 as long as the width falls with the wheel tolerance
Any 700c tire will fit, yes.

To avoid confusion about tire and rim sizes, it's best to look for the ETRTO designations. For 700c and 29 wheels and rims, the diameter is 622 mm. To give another example of why the ETRTO designation is critical, 27" rims have an ETRTO diameter of 630mm, so 27" rims are larger than 29" rims. And as for "26 inch" wheels, there are at least five different sizes that are all called 26 inch.
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Old 04-12-24, 05:58 PM
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you ordered a performance mountain bike and it will be specced for that, so you should expect mountain bike size rims

700cc = 29 but it is more complicated than that.

you have to be careful with tires as it looks like you have a hookless rim (specs show Oquo Mountain Performance MP30LTD, carbon hookless rim) with 30mm rims that are designed for tubeless) this could be different that exactly what you ordered so it is important to know exactly what wheels (and rims) you are getting

a lot of smaller tires will not fit well with the 30 mm width

the schwalbe are likely to not fit, look at these instead in the endurance build https://www.renehersecycles.com/shop...-pass-tc-tire/

additional information on tires and hookless rims

https://www.renehersecycles.com/tech-info/tires/
https://bike.bikegremlin.com/15864/hookless-rims/
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Old 04-12-24, 10:20 PM
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If, as suggested above, your rims are 30mm internal and hookless, you'll need to be more cautious about your tire choice. You'll do best with a tubeless tire but you'll need to check the tire's manufacturer to make sure they consider it hookless compatible. Schwalbe does with their mtb tires, had to check that since I run rocket rons. Not every brand considers their tubeless tires hookless compatible since if the tire stretches a little it can blow off. You can also get away with wire bead tires as long as they sit properly but my experience is that wire bead isn't always round enough to sit properly easily. The wire bead won't stretch and this was common back in the 80s and earlier when cheap bikes can with hookless steel or aluminum rims. But you really can't go over 60psi with a wire tire in my experience, even to seat the tire, maybe newer products with better tolerances will allow it but I wouldn't trust it based on my past experiences.
At 30mm internal you probably can't put anything smaller than 35 or 36mm wide on it, on the plus side there's currently a wide crop of 38 and 40mm tires for riding road/rail trail. Just double check.
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Old 04-12-24, 10:51 PM
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I resolved the rim width issue by purchasing some 25mm wheels
Also remember if you have disc brakes, you can even put on 27.5" wheels if the hubs are compatible
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Old 04-15-24, 10:57 AM
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from rene hersePlease refer to theofficial ETRTO / ISO tire and rim compatibility chart (below). If the rim is too wide, the tire can blow off, because it doesn’t properly engage with the rim’s sidewall.
Narrow tires (≤30 mm): To allow optimizing the aerodynamics of racing bikes, the ETRTO chart is pushing the limits of how wide the rim can be. If all dimensions of your rims are perfectly to spec—usually the case on high-end rims—that’s no problem. If you are running rims that came stock on your bike, it’s safest to keep the rims at least 20% narrower than your tires (≤21 mm rims for 26 mm tires; ≤23 mm rims for 28 mm tires).

You may have heard that matched rim and tire widths make the tire sidewalls more vertical, so they bear more of the bike and rider’s weight. This may work with stiff sidewalls and allows running a lower tire pressure, but also decreases shock absorption and comfort.

With supple tires, almost the entire weight is supported by the air pressure of the tires. Whether the sidewalls are vertical or bulge makes very little difference.
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Old 04-15-24, 12:00 PM
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That Rene Herse chart doesn't make a lot of sense in some cases, although the overall concept as a whole is valid.

For example, a 35mm tire can go on a max of 27mm width rim but a 44mm tire can go on a 28mm width rim. Not sure how 1mm on added rim width relates to a 9mm wider tire, but going up 2mm from a 28mm wide rim to a 30mm wide rim only nets you the ability to go up 4mm from 44mm to 48mm tire. Whatever rules or criteria they're trying to apply are not being applied with any consistency.
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Old 04-15-24, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by NumbersGuy
That Rene Herse chart doesn't make a lot of sense in some cases, although the overall concept as a whole is valid.

For example, a 35mm tire can go on a max of 27mm width rim but a 44mm tire can go on a 28mm width rim. Not sure how 1mm on added rim width relates to a 9mm wider tire, but going up 2mm from a 28mm wide rim to a 30mm wide rim only nets you the ability to go up 4mm from 44mm to 48mm tire. Whatever rules or criteria they're trying to apply are not being applied with any consistency.
to note this is the chart from the tire standards org.... ERTRO it is on the rene herse site, not that it makes any difference with your observations. I would be interesting to understand the parameters
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