Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > General Cycling Discussion
Reload this Page >

Best Bicycle Books

Notices
General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Best Bicycle Books

Old 05-31-06, 07:49 PM
  #1  
Ranzak
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Best Bicycle Books

Ok looking for your favorite books on bicycling; any type>
 
Old 05-31-06, 08:07 PM
  #2  
Ranzak
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
For instance anyone read this book: Inside the Tour De France: The Pictures, the Legends, And the Untold Stories of the World's Most Beloved Bicycle Race (Hardcover, 2006)
Author: Eric Delanzy
 
Old 05-31-06, 08:45 PM
  #3  
spider-man
Ferrous wheel
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,388

Bikes: 2004 Gunnar Rock Hound MTB; 1988 Gitane Team Pro road bike; 1986-ish Raleigh USA Grand Prix; mid-'80s Univega Gran Tourismo with Xtracycle Free Radical

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Bicycle, by David Herlihy
Curious George Rides a Bike, by H.A. Rey
spider-man is offline  
Old 05-31-06, 09:00 PM
  #4  
pmseattle
Senior Member
 
pmseattle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 450
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
This is another fairly common thread topic, and every time I see it I recommend Around the World on a Bicycle, by Thomas Stevens. Although many people have accomplished this feat, Stevens was the first in 1885 - 1887, and he did it on a penny-farthing.
pmseattle is offline  
Old 05-31-06, 09:48 PM
  #5  
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 5,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
"Pushing the Limits" by John Howard and Peter Nye. The story of John Howards career, focusing on the period from 1968 to 1978, when he was America's leading road cyclist. It is a good overview of American cycling in the "bike boom" when more Americans bought road bikes than in any decade in history.

"Delong's Guide to Bicycles and Bicycling" by Fred DeLong. The best book I've seen on bike design, bike fitting, and owner maintainance of a bike.

"Richard's Bicycle Book" by Richard Ballantine. Many editions between around 1970 and 1995. It is fun to compare editions, as Richard's attitude changes over the decades. In 1970, road bikes were the ONLY bike to buy...then he fell in love with 'bent's, then he became passionate about mountain bikes.

"23 Days in July" by John Wilcockson. One of the best "inside the Tour de France" books I've read.

"The Art of Urban Cycling" by Robert Hurst. Although 246 pages is a LOT of reading (the world needs a good 20 page guide to the art of urban cycling) Hurst does a great job of discussing the issues involved in riding in the mean streets of urban America. If everyone who rides in heavy urban traffic reads and re-reads this book, it will prevent a lot of needless stress, injuries, and even fatalities.
alanbikehouston is offline  
Old 05-31-06, 11:03 PM
  #6  
FarHorizon
Senior Curmudgeon
 
FarHorizon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Directly above the center of the earth
Posts: 3,856

Bikes: Varies by day

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
"The Clear Creek Bike Book"
FarHorizon is offline  
Old 06-01-06, 11:21 AM
  #7  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 24,276

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4274 Post(s)
Liked 1,789 Times in 1,087 Posts
Wheels of Chance by H.G. Wells (yes. That H.G. Wells ) An amusing tale of bicycle touring in England of the 1890's

The wonderful ride: Being the true journal of Mr. George T. Loher who in 1895 cycled from coast to coast on his Yellow Fellow wheel by George T Loher. A tour from San Fransico to New York on a 'safety cycle'

Bicycles in war by Martin Caidin. A fascinating look at bicycle use in wartime.

Major Taylor : The Extraordinary Career of a Champion Bicycle Racer by Andrew Ritchie.

The Santa Fe Trail by Bicycle by Elaine Pinkerton. A good travelogue of the 1200 mile trip from Santa Fe, New Mexico to New Franklin, Missouri.

The Dancing Chain: History and Development of the Derailleur Bicycle by Frank Berto. The uber bicycle geeks guide to the derailleur. Wonderful history of the development of our drivetrains.

And maybe the best book ever written on bicycle maintenance: Anybody's Bike Book by Tom Cuthbertson.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.

Last edited by cyccommute; 06-01-06 at 11:27 AM.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 06-01-06, 12:51 PM
  #8  
spider-man
Ferrous wheel
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,388

Bikes: 2004 Gunnar Rock Hound MTB; 1988 Gitane Team Pro road bike; 1986-ish Raleigh USA Grand Prix; mid-'80s Univega Gran Tourismo with Xtracycle Free Radical

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Bicycles and Tricycles: A Classic Treatise on Their Design and Construction, by Archibald Sharp
spider-man is offline  
Old 06-01-06, 01:00 PM
  #9  
Shifty
Sore saddle cyclist
 
Shifty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 3,881

Bikes: Road, touring and mountain

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
French Revolutions by Tim Moore Very funny account of a British journalist's coverage of the Tour de France.
Shifty is offline  
Old 06-01-06, 05:46 PM
  #10  
Feldman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 1,104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 31 Posts
"The Man Who Loved Bicycles," Daniel Behrman, 1974
"Lance Armstrong's War" Daniel Coyle, 2004
"The Golden Age of Handbuilt Bicycles" Jan Heine, 2005
"Tales From the Toolbox," Scott Parr, 1996
(at a tangent) "Car Sinister," Robert Silverberg, 1978
"The Art of Wheelbuilding" Gerd Schraner, 2000

There's a few on diverse topics, enjoy.
Feldman is offline  
Old 06-02-06, 05:34 PM
  #11  
smoore
Senior Member
 
smoore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Hour north of Atlanta, Gainesville GA
Posts: 968

Bikes: Primary ride now a LOOK 585-Love it.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 38 Posts
Originally Posted by alanbikehouston
"Pushing the Limits" by John Howard and Peter Nye. The story of John Howards career, focusing on the period from 1968 to 1978, when he was America's leading road cyclist. It is a good overview of American cycling in the "bike boom" when more Americans bought road bikes than in any decade in history.
Amen to that. I thought I was the only who had ever even heard of this book....let alone read it. Howard was a monster and still competitive for his age.

A great read and tribute to one of the pioneers when cycling in the U.S. was even lesser known than it is now.

Steve
smoore is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 02:18 PM
  #12  
Jakelin
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: PDX
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I recently bought Cycling's Greatest Misadventures but I am waiting to read it when I am on vacation in a week or so. I was wondering if anyone else had books to add to this list. This thread seemed to have the most recommendations so I dug it up out of the vault. I'm particularly interested in non-maintenence bike books.
Jakelin is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 03:11 PM
  #13  
Jet Travis
Ride Daddy Ride
 
Jet Travis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Villa Incognito
Posts: 2,648

Bikes: 1983 Trek 720; 1983 Trek 620; 1989 Gi Cannondale Bad Boy Ultra; LeMond Victoire; Bike Friday Pocket Rocket Pro

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Bicycle Love--one of my favorites

https://www.amazon.com/Bicycle-Love-S.../dp/1891369458
__________________
"Light it up, Popo." --Levi Leipheimer
Jet Travis is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 03:33 PM
  #14  
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 5,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
"Bike for Life" by Roy Wallack and Bill Katovsky. The book includes interviews with "giants" of American cycling, including Gary Fisher, John Howard, Hohn Sinibaldi, Ned Overend, Mike Sinyard, and Jim Ocowicz. The authors make the case for cycling being a 52 week a year activity for anyone between the age of five and a hundred and five (and Mr. Sinibaldi gave THAT goal his best shot).

A terrific book about cycling as part of an active and healthy life, with attention to nutrition, stess reduction, and other health issues.
alanbikehouston is offline  
Old 08-22-07, 11:03 PM
  #15  
zowie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: US
Posts: 829
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
I loved Heft on Wheels. I'm going to give copies as gifts.
I also agree that Bike for Life was very good.
zowie is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 08:26 AM
  #16  
oopfoo
Evil Genius
 
oopfoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Tallahassee, Florida USA
Posts: 632

Bikes: Pedal Force ZX3, Gary V Titanio, 1985 Cinelli Supercorsa, 1981 Pogliaghi, 1995 Casati Ellisse, Cinelli Softmachine hardtail, Surly Pugsley

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you liked Bike for Life and Heft on Wheels (two of my favorites), then try Ten Points by Bicycling editor, Bill Strickland. A great story about cycling and psychology, overcoming one's inner demons through sport. A very good read, especially for the older cyclist.

Another favorite is the new Cycling's Golden Age: Heroes of the Postwar Era, 1946-1967, The Horton Collection by Brett Horton, Shelly Horton, Owen Mulholland, and Eddy Merckx. This features LOTS of photos and great biographical information about cycling's greatest riders. One of the best, for certain.
__________________
-- Michael
oopfoo is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 08:03 PM
  #17  
MKahrl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 1,125

Bikes: Rivendell A.Homer Hilsen, Paramount P13, (4) Falcon bicycles, Mondia Special, Rodriguez Tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 9 Posts
"Three Men on the Bummel " is about three Englishmen on a bicycle tour of Germany in 1900 and it's hilarious. Current paperback versions are bundled with "Three Men in a Boat and it's even funnier. Read both.
MKahrl is offline  
Old 08-23-07, 10:59 PM
  #18  
divergence
del dot
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Santa Cruz CA
Posts: 210

Bikes: Tour Easy

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
One of my all-time favorites is Dervla Murphy's "Full Tilt: Ireland to India with a Bicycle". It's the first in a long series of books about her travels, and describes a trip she took in 1963. It's a great read, and she's a hell of a character. Resourceful, funny, and determined as hell...in some parts of the story it seems like a rare luxury when she actually gets to ride the bicycle, rather than pushing it through monsoon muds or slinging it around her torso as she clambers over a glacier.

She's got a great, understated sense of humor, which seems to get dryer the more danger she's in. ("Until that moment in my life, I had always regarded the thought of being devoured by wolves as faintly humorous." I'm probably not quoting the line exactly right, but the attitude is spot-on. Except she probably said it better.) She encounters all sorts of fascinating people, from royalty to remote villagers who have never seen a bicycle (some of whom then have great examining the bike until they figure out how a drivetrain works and excitedly explaining it to their friends.) She strikes up great friendships with many of the folks she meets, fervently dislikes a smaller number, and has to defend her life against one or two, whom she then punishes by continuing to make dry jokes at their expense for the next few chapters. And then she always moves on to the next section of her trip alone, because she's the only one crazy enough to want to do it.

A lot of the sections are far more poignant now than they would have been when she wrote the book. A large portion of her time was spent exploring Afghanistan, just a few years before the country would become a chew-toy fought over by the superpowers, and then an arena for the theocratic lunatics that both sides had armed. Many of the remote and peaceful places she describes are blasted wastelands now, and many of the people she met probably didn't survive the following decades.

If you give the book a try and enjoy it, there's a lot more where it came from; to this day, she's still touring the world and writing books. But this one has the added charm of watching someone first learning their craft, both as a traveler and as a writer, and it's a great place to start reading her stuff.
divergence is offline  
Old 08-24-07, 10:33 AM
  #19  
Artkansas 
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Posts: 12,851
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
People have already mentioned Curious George Rides a Bike and Bicycles In War, so I'll have to put in a plug for Bicycling Bliss by Portia Masterson. It's a great book on bicycling as wellness. It's a must read. Follow the link above to find out more.

A good blast back in time is "Between My Legs" by Chaim Sil. It's an interesting book in the vein of On the Road by Jack Kerouac or The Drifters by James A. Michener

And Bicycling Science 3rd Edition by David Gordon Wilson. Interesting reading if a bit technical.

Last edited by Artkansas; 08-24-07 at 10:49 AM.
Artkansas is offline  
Old 08-30-07, 05:09 PM
  #20  
Fangu
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 109
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Josie Dew's travelogs are a lot of fun.
My favorites are-
Wind in my Wheels (compilation of travels from Iceland, Bulgaria, Morroco etc)
Slow Coast Home (tour around the coast of Britain)
Travels in a strange State (adventures in the US)
She has a lively writing style and is amazingly fearless as she sets off solo & fully loaded on her Roberts tourer- highly recommended!
Fangu is offline  
Old 09-03-07, 07:27 AM
  #21  
smoore
Senior Member
 
smoore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Hour north of Atlanta, Gainesville GA
Posts: 968

Bikes: Primary ride now a LOOK 585-Love it.

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 114 Post(s)
Liked 50 Times in 38 Posts
Here's one I've never seen mentioned, Over the Hills by David Lamb.

Lamb is a newspaper writer in D.C. and decides at age 54 to buy a bike and ride from VA to Santa Monica Pier. He's out of shape, a smoker and virtually no riding experience. Becuase writing is his trade it was a very good read and I'll not tell you if he made it or not. His style reminded me a bit of Bill Bryson.

The publisher is G.K.Hall, 1996.

Steve
smoore is offline  
Old 09-03-07, 06:20 PM
  #22  
cruzMOKS
just over the next hill
 
cruzMOKS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Kansas City MO
Posts: 543

Bikes: Bianchi Volpe 2006 Fuji Tahoe

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Here is a list of books I got from various lists (including this one) off bikeforums.net.


"23 Days in July" by John Wilcockson. One of the best "inside the Tour de France" books I've read.

"The American Bicycle" a 200 page picture/text history. Amazing pics of all sorts of interesting early (and lat) designs, etc. Great fun book.

And maybe the best book ever written on bicycle maintenance: Anybody's Bike Book by Tom Cuthbertson.

Around the World on a Bicycle, by Thomas Stevens. Although many people have accomplished this feat, Stevens was the first in 1885 - 1887, and he did it on a penny-farthing.

"The Art of Urban Cycling" by Robert Hurst. Although 246 pages is a LOT of reading (the world needs a good 20 page guide to the art of urban cycling) Hurst does a great job of discussing the issues involved in riding in the mean streets of urban America. If everyone who rides in heavy urban traffic reads and re-reads this book, it will prevent a lot of needless stress, injuries, and even fatalities.

"The Art of Wheelbuilding" Gerd Schraner, 2000

A good blast back in time is "Between My Legs" by Chaim Sil. It's an interesting book in the vein of On the Road by Jack Kerouac or The Drifters by James A. Michener

Bicycle, by David Herlihy

The Bicycle, by Pryor Dodge, Flammarion, publisher, 224 pp., 1996.
"A beautifully illustrated book on the history of the bicycle, based on the author's collection."
https://users.aol.com/pryordodge/index.html

Bicycle Love--one of my favorites
https://www.amazon.com/Bicycle-Love-S.../dp/1891369458

Bicycles and Tricycles: A Classic Treatise on Their Design and Construction, by Archibald Sharp

Bicycles in war by Martin Caidin. A fascinating look at bicycle use in wartime.

Bicycling Bliss by Portia Masterson. It's a great book on bicycling as wellness. It's a must read. Follow the link above to find out more.

And Bicycling Science 3rd Edition by David Gordon Wilson. Interesting reading if a bit technical.

"Bike for Life" by Roy Wallack and Bill Katovsky. The book includes interviews with "giants" of American cycling, including Gary Fisher, John Howard, Hohn Sinibaldi, Ned Overend, Mike Sinyard, and Jim Ocowicz. The authors make the case for cycling being a 52 week a year activity for anyone between the age of five and a hundred and five (and Mr. Sinibaldi gave THAT goal his best shot).
A terrific book about cycling as part of an active and healthy life, with attention to nutrition, stess reduction, and other health issues.

Bobke II, fun to read but aren't "training manuals"

"Breakaway," Samuel Abt's 1984 book on the Tour. I like this because it was a first American's journalistic glimpse inside pro cycling's culture before it changed to more closely resemble US pro sports.
'Breaking The Chain' by Willy Voet.

"Car Sinister," Robert Silverberg, 1978 SciFi

Catfish and Mandala by Andrew Pham, cycling in Vietnam.

"The Clear Creek Bike Book"

Curious George Rides a Bike, by H.A. Rey

"Cycling" by R.C. Shaw. One sentence is worth the price of the book: "...it is regrettable that many young riders adopt an absurdly exaggerated racing position for normal riding. They do harm to themselves and to the good name of cycling." He added that riding in "a position which is suitable for a cyclist on a racing track...is not...appropriate for a (cyclist) who merely uses his bicycle to ride between home and school and has to share the roads with other forms of traffic."
Because Mr. Shaw passed away about forty years ago, he did not have to suffer through an era where many young riders dress up exactly like Lance Armstrong, and set up their bikes in time trial positions, merely to "race" to Starbucks. It is a pleasure to read a book from an era in old England when MOST adult men rode bikes on a daily basis, and very few confused "riding a bike" with "racing a bike".

"The Cycling Adventures of Coconut Head" Ted Schredd. A guy needs a change, convinces someone to sell all their stuff and ride with virtually no money from BC, down the west coast and circumnavigate the US. Diary style with interesting cartoons.

Another favorite is the new Cycling's Golden Age: Heroes of the Postwar Era, 1946-1967,

Cycling's Greatest Misadventures

'Cycling Health & Physiology' by Ed Burke.

Cycling Past 50

I'm reading Friel's "The Cyclists Training Bible" right now. It's pretty good if you don't have an understanding of periodization and specificity training. But if you're already familiar with those concepts, and how to schedule effective workouts encompassing hard workouts, easy workouts, and rest, then you'll find the book just fills in a few missing holes.

The Dancing Chain: History and Development of the Derailleur Bicycle by Frank Berto. The uber bicycle geeks guide to the derailleur. Wonderful history of the development of our drivetrains.

"Delong's Guide to Bicycles and Bicycling" by Fred DeLong. The best book I've seen on bike design, bike fitting, and owner maintainance of a bike.


'Destination Lapland' by Mark Wallington
The author sets off in the late 1980's from St Albans to cycle to Lapland on a second-hand tourer of dubious mechanical sturdiness. The book recounts his travels, the squashed wildlife, the chain failures etc. as he travels towards Newcastle.
Very silly, very light but well worth a read if you come across it (probably long out of print). I'd read a couple of his other travel books (one walking, one boating) and his novel 'The missing postman'. All worth a read when you want something light but well written.

Eddy Merckx. This features LOTS of photos and great biographical information about cycling's greatest riders. One of the best, for certain.

Effective Cycling by John Forester. Forester has an acid tongue (a poison pen?), but this is THE guide for riding in traffic. He also has a website.

m just now reading The Essential Touring Cyclist by Richard A. Lovett. Pretty good book that I can recommend.

In terms of being a broad based introducatory book about cycling, I thought the Gregg Lemond book, Everything you need to know about cycling is a good read.

'The Fastest Man On Two Wheels - In Pursuit Of Chris Boardman' by Phil Liggett.

Tom Vernon's three 'Fatman ...' books, particularly 'Fatman on a Bicycle' are recommended.



"Free-Wheelin', A Solo Journey Across America," Richard Lovett.

French Revolutions by Tim Moore Very funny account of a British journalist's coverage of the Tour de France.

One of my all-time favorites is Dervla Murphy's "Full Tilt: Ireland to India with a Bicycle". It's the first in a long series of books about her travels, and describes a trip she took in 1963. It's a great read, and she's a hell of a character. Resourceful, funny, and determined as hell...in some parts of the story it seems like a rare luxury when she actually gets to ride the bicycle, rather than pushing it through monsoon muds or slinging it around her torso as she clambers over a glacier.
She's got a great, understated sense of humor, which seems to get dryer the more danger she's in. ("Until that moment in my life, I had always regarded the thought of being devoured by wolves as faintly humorous." I'm probably not quoting the line exactly right, but the attitude is spot-on. Except she probably said it better.) She encounters all sorts of fascinating people, from royalty to remote villagers who have never seen a bicycle (some of whom then have great examining the bike until they figure out how a drivetrain works and excitedly explaining it to their friends.) She strikes up great friendships with many of the folks she meets, fervently dislikes a smaller number, and has to defend her life against one or two, whom she then punishes by continuing to make dry jokes at their expense for the next few chapters. And then she always moves on to the next section of her trip alone, because she's the only one crazy enough to want to do it.
A lot of the sections are far more poignant now than they would have been when she wrote the book. A large portion of her time was spent exploring Afghanistan, just a few years before the country would become a chew-toy fought over by the superpowers, and then an arena for the theocratic lunatics that both sides had armed. Many of the remote and peaceful places she describes are blasted wastelands now, and many of the people she met probably didn't survive the following decades.
If you give the book a try and enjoy it, there's a lot more where it came from; to this day, she's still touring the world and writing books. But this one has the added charm of watching someone first learning their craft, both as a traveler and as a writer, and it's a great place to start reading her stuff.

"The Golden Age of Handbuilt Bicycles" Jan Heine, 2005

No one going to give a shout for Gracie Goat?

"Half-Wheel Hell & Other Cycling Stories," also by Maynard Hershon.

I loved Heft on Wheels. I'm going to give copies as gifts.

The Horton Collection by Brett Horton, Shelly Horton, Owen Mulholland,

"The Idiots Guide . . . " Much better than I expected, good for filling in holes in knowledge, inculding history and racers, and a really good ilustrated section on some fairly complex repairs.

The Immortal Class by Travis Hugh Culley - the best book on bicycle messengering

Inside the Tour De France: The Pictures, the Legends, And the Untold Stories of the World's Most Beloved Bicycle Race (Hardcover, 2006)
Author: Eric Delanzy

Inside the Postal Bus,

Iron Riders: Story of the Buffalo Soldier Bicycle Corps

'It's Not About The Bike - My Journey Back To Life' by Lance Armstrong.

I read "the Handbook of Competitive Cycling" (by Achim Schimid) and it's realy good for learning how to set up a training schedual. I also asked for the "Noblist Invention" for Christmas, someone on the forums posted a review for It and they seemed to like it. It's about the invention of the bicycle and it has a forward by Lance Armstrong.


Hearts Of Lions: The Story Of American Bicycle Racing by Peter Joffre Nye - the best book on this subject

'In Pursuit Of The Yellow Jersey' by Samuel Abt & James Startt.

"Into The Remote Places" Ian Hibell

"Lance Armstrong's War" Daniel Coyle, 2004


Le Tour is a nice history of the Tour de France.

Major Taylor : The Extraordinary Career of a Champion Bicycle Racer by Andrew Ritchie.

"The Man Who Loved Bicycles," Daniel Behrman, 1974

Metal Cowboy.
They're fun to read but aren't "training manuals"

'Miguel Indurain' by Noel Truyers.

Miles From Nowhere by Barbara Savage. In 1978 Barbara convinced her husband Larry to bicycle around the world with her - the book is Barb's first person account of this journey thru America, Canada, Europe, Morrocco, Egypt, India and Southeast Asia, and New Zealand. I just finished reading this one for the second time so that I could write a book review about it for my new website.

I seem to remember 'The Missing Postman' by Mark Wallington wasn't a bad novel largely set on a bike.

Need For The Bike by Paul Fournel


You may enjoy,
"Nerves of Steel" by Rebecca "Lambchop" Reilly
It's about cycling as a Bicycle Messenger in various cities. . . Very exciting and informative.

Here's one I've never seen mentioned, Over the Hills by David Lamb.
Lamb is a newspaper writer in D.C. and decides at age 54 to buy a bike and ride from VA to Santa Monica Pier. He's out of shape, a smoker and virtually no riding experience. Becuase writing is his trade it was a very good read and I'll not tell you if he made it or not. His style reminded me a bit of Bill Bryson.
The publisher is G.K.Hall, 1996.

'Off the Rails' about two guys that cycled from western Russia to Beijing over the course of two years. Really good book.

"Off to the Races, 25 Years of Cycling Journalism," Samuel Apt. A wonderful collection of writing and stories. I like anything by Samuel Apt.

On the Trail of Marco Polo by Brady Fotheringham, about a ride from China to India

"Over the Hills. A Midlife Escape Across America by Bicycle," David Lamb.

"The Paterek Manual" because of it my first frame was straight, sound, and safe.

"Pushing the Limits" by John Howard and Peter Nye. The story of John Howards career, focusing on the period from 1968 to 1978, when he was America's leading road cyclist. It is a good overview of American cycling in the "bike boom" when more Americans bought road bikes than in any decade in history.
Amen to that. I thought I was the only who had ever even heard of this book....let alone read it. Howard was a monster and still competitive for his age.
A great read and tribute to one of the pioneers when cycling in the U.S. was even lesser known than it is now.

'Put Me Back On My Bike' by William Fotheringham.

"The Race" by Davie Shields. Relatively new author, and a cyclist to boot. I thoroughly enjoyed them; if you're looking for something cycling related to read between Tour de France stages, I can recommend these.
I posted some praise on his website and asked about sequels, and got a nice reply in a couple hours.

"Richard's Bicycle Book" by Richard Ballantine. Many editions between around 1970 and 1995. It is fun to compare editions, as Richard's attitude changes over the decades. In 1970, road bikes were the ONLY bike to buy...then he fell in love with 'bent's, then he became passionate about mountain bikes.

the rider
My well-worn copy of the The Rider sits on my bookshelf waiting for it's next read. Next to it is French Revolutions: Cycling the Tour de France by Tim Moore.

'Rough Ride' by Paul Kimmage.
Paul Kimmage, a domestique in the 1980s (and now a respected journalist) during the glory days of Irish cycling when Sean Kelly and Stephen Roche were winning everything in sight wrote a book called Rough Ride. Its viewed by many as a classic but he was ostracised by most of cycling world for his tales of doping. Of course 10 years after the books publication we find out half the pro cycling world was doping.

The Santa Fe Trail by Bicycle by Elaine Pinkerton. A good travelogue of the 1200 mile trip from Santa Fe, New Mexico to New Franklin, Missouri.

Serious Cycling
https://www.amazon.com/Serious-Cyclin...4190795&sr=8-1

Slow Coast Home (tour around the coast of Britain) Josie Dew's travelogs are a lot of fun.She has a lively writing style and is amazingly fearless as she sets off solo & fully loaded on her Roberts tourer- highly recommended!

try smart cycling by arnie baker

Spokesongs by Willie Weir. This book is a collection of public radio commentaries written by Willie while he was bicycle touring thru India, South Africa, and the Balkans. I almost didn't buy the book because those are 3 places I had absolutely zero interest in - but Willie's writing is truly excellent and this book is GREAT! So good that I have read this book 3 times and loaned it out twice.

"Tales from the Bike Shop," Maynard Hershon

"Tales From the Toolbox," Scott Parr, 1996

If you liked Bike for Life and Heft on Wheels (two of my favorites), then try Ten Points by Bicycling editor, Bill Strickland. A great story about cycling and psychology, overcoming one's inner demons through sport. A very good read, especially for the older cyclist.

The Third Policeman by Flann OBrian is must for any literate cyclist.

"Three Men on the Bummel " is about three Englishmen on a bicycle tour of Germany in 1900 and it's hilarious. Current paperback versions are bundled with "Three Men in a Boat and it's even funnier. Read both.

"The Tour" by Davie Shields. Relatively new author, and a cyclist to boot. I thoroughly enjoyed them; if you're looking for something cycling related to read between Tour de France stages, I can recommend these.
I posted some praise on his website and asked about sequels, and got a nice reply in a couple hours.

The Tour Baby DVD you definitely have to check that out.

The Tour De France by Christopher Thompson is an interesting look at the cultural history of the Tour.
Very straightforward, factual look at the Tour; if you're looking for something with some emotion, look elsewhere.

Eric Newby - 'Travels round Ireland in Low Gear' is good

Travels in a strange State (adventures in the US) Josie Dew's travelogs are a lot of fun. She has a lively writing style and is amazingly fearless as she sets off solo & fully loaded on her Roberts tourer- highly recommended!

Wheels of Chance by H.G. Wells (yes. That H.G. Wells ) An amusing tale of bicycle touring in England of the 1890's

Wind in my Wheels (compilation of travels from Iceland, Bulgaria, Morroco etc) Josie Dew's travelogs are a lot of fun. She has a lively writing style and is amazingly fearless as she sets off solo & fully loaded on her Roberts tourer- highly recommended!

The wonderful ride: Being the true journal of Mr. George T. Loher who in 1895 cycled from coast to coast on his Yellow Fellow wheel by George T Loher. A tour from San Fransico to New York on a 'safety cycle'

Picked up Zinn's Road Cycling Maintenance book last week and am loving it. I am just about as mechanically UNinclined as one can be, yet had no problem fixing my bike up after a fall. Great book!

Ken Kifer's List
https://www.cadence90.com/spincycle/bikebooks.htm
__________________
Enjoy the ride.
Bianchi Volpe 2006; Fuji Tahoe 1990
cruzMOKS is offline  
Old 09-03-07, 07:00 PM
  #23  
midschool22
Digging in the pain cave.
 
midschool22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 717
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
One of my choices...



It's no exaggeration to say that the sport of BMX freestyle couldn't exist as it does today without the efforts of Hoffman, the first rider to "pull a 900" (rotate the bike in the air two and a half times after escalating off the ramp). At age 17, he bought a semi truck and put together a touring team of trick riders. Two years later, he started Hoffman Bikes (it still exists) with a loan from the Small Business Administration, a few friends, and an immense amount of desire. He helped ESPN2 produce the early X Games. He's broken countless bones, had several concussions, and undergone an experimental ACL reconstruction without anesthesia. Hoffman tells his story from the time he dropped out of school to ride in BMX tournaments professionally until late 2002, when he was 30 and he, skateboarder Tony Hawk, and many other extreme sports superstars took the "Boom Boom Huck Jam" music and sports production on the road. Nearly every page of the book has at least one black-and-white photograph showing Hoffman in action; a few color photos are also included. An appendix defines the more complicated tricks. Though Hoffman's tale will be enjoyed mostly by extreme-sports enthusiasts, anyone could find inspiration from the success and pleasure he has gotten from hard work, passion, and desire.
midschool22 is offline  
Old 09-04-07, 05:53 AM
  #24  
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 5,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I have read, or taken a look at most of the books in Cruzmok's list. Almost every one of these books is worth reading, and many are "must have" books for people who are serious about cycling.

It would be worthwhile to print Cruzmok's list, and keep it handy for book shopping. Most of those books turn up from time to time at "Half Price Books" and other used book stores, even though some have been "out of print" for twenty years.

Last edited by alanbikehouston; 09-04-07 at 07:32 AM.
alanbikehouston is offline  
Old 09-04-07, 10:26 AM
  #25  
closetbiker
Senior Member
 
closetbiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 9,630
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 6 Posts
I've read a lot of these books, and meant to read a few other listed (but got waysided), so I'll add a couple of more that I don't see listed.

The 10 speed Commandments, by Mike Keefe

https://www.amazon.com/Ten-Speed-Comm.../dp/0385238037

and (I can't believe no ones mentioned it yet), The Yellow Jersey, by Ralph Hurne. A classic.

https://www.amazon.com/Yellow-Jersey-...8924447&sr=1-1

Originally Posted by Cruzmok
You may enjoy,
"Nerves of Steel" by Rebecca "Lambchop" Reilly
It's about cycling as a Bicycle Messenger in various cities. . . Very exciting and informative.
Just checked it out on Amazon and it's selling for $198!!

one of the comments was by a friend

yes this is a self-published book and she busted her butt to get it out there. I only wish she knew what the book, which originally sold for $20, is going for these days, because she probably has a box or two of them sitting in her basement in Buffalo (and she's probably still chipping away at the debt generated by publishing it). :-)

and another comment

Too bad that Amazon only has used copies for sale at such exhorbitant prices. This, effectively, cuts-off access to this book to the general public. Even DC Courier, who used to sell the book directly, no longer has an online store to sell this book.

Sad that such an amazing book, which should be read more widely, is effectively cutoff from the circulation it deserves.

Last edited by closetbiker; 09-04-07 at 10:42 AM.
closetbiker is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.