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Recommendations please?

Old 06-27-03, 04:14 PM
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robbo
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Recommendations please?

:confused: OK, I want to get a bike, ride to work during the week and maybe do some riding on smoothish tracks around the local forest park. I'm thinking of maybe the Claude Butler Legend as it seems very practical, any opinions? Any other suggestions for up to about 300 would be welcomed. Are Raleigh bikes any good these days? (childhood memories!)
Thanks in advance, like the site and helpful posts
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Old 06-27-03, 05:51 PM
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I wasn't familiar with that line of bikes, so I did a google search and found a little on it. Seems like a standard hybrid bike like the Trek 7000 series, the Raleigh Sport Cruisers, and the Giant Sedona's. These bikes are becoming quite popular with people who don't ride real rough or far, so they may well be what you are looking for.

Raleigh isn't nearly as big as it once was, but they still produce quality rides. From reviews I've read, the only complaint people have voiced about Raleigh is that their bikes tend to be a little heavier than other companies.

Before you buy, find several bikes that interest you and compare what you like/dislike about each. In cycling, comfort is VERY important, so make sure get a chance to sit on each one and pedal them around a little bit. Also, if you're going to be riding more than 10-15 miles, several times a week, consider a road bike.
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Old 06-28-03, 03:44 AM
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A lot of hybrid-style bikes in the UK come from the same factory in Taiwan, but with different labels on. The bikes can be quite OK, but a lot depends on the quality of assembly.
My only reservation is in the suspension system. At this price, they use the cheapest suspension forks and seatposts. Im not sure they are designed for everyday commuting use, they are more likely to be used by occasional leisure riders on sunny weekends. The alternative to a suspension fork is one made of steel, but "chromoly" grade rather than the cheaper, heavier "hi-tensile" grade of steel.
Make sure you buy from a proper bike shop, so they can check the assembly and if there are any problems, you can take it back for adjustments.
The bike comes with luggage rack and mudguards, so is pretty good value.
Make sure the bike fits you properly, you should have about 2-3" of standover clerance to the top tube, and the bars should feel a comfortable distance from the saddle.
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Old 06-28-03, 04:14 PM
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robbo
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Brilliant, thanks for the advice - I tried a few (the local proper bike shop let me have test rides) and found the Legend just felt too "sit up and beg" and, well, old if you know what I mean. I also appreciate the point about suspension, I can see it might help proper mtb-ers but I don't think I'd benefit from it.

In the end I went for a Claude Butler Urban 200. No suspension, mudguards or rack but gears, wheels etc seem good quality and it seems well put together. Riding back from the shop along the canal toepaths was ace, why did I leave this so long?!
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Old 06-28-03, 04:34 PM
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I think you made a good choice. Cheap suspension systems on budget-priced bikes are to be avoided, and only hard-core mountain bikers need suspension, anyway.
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