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Upgrading components

Old 03-28-11, 04:40 PM
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ajames15
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Upgrading components

When you are upgrading your components, do you do everything at once for uniformity or do you go one at a time? I'm figuring going one at a tome is a lot easier on the wallet, but I have the problem that love having consistency (eg all 105 or whatever your favorite you like).
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Old 03-28-11, 04:55 PM
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Mr. Beanz
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Why would you upgrade?
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Old 03-28-11, 05:03 PM
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Monster Pete
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I certainly don't care for consistency- having a Sturmey-Archer rear hub, shimano brakes and unidentified everything else. The only things that really have to match are parts that work together, such as derailleurs and shifters, and even then there are often workarounds. As long as it works properly, I don't care who made it.

As Mr. Beanz said, there's no real reason to upgrade just for the sake of it. If you're unhappy with components in particular, change them for parts you do get on with (not necessarily meaning lighter/more expensive etc). Leaving perfectly functioning components in place is far easier on your wallet.
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Old 03-28-11, 05:20 PM
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Good to be practical if you have to be, but if you don't need to be practical and want matching components, then by all means go for it. Personally I'd do it all at once, but take whatever route you think you'd get the most enjoyment/buck out of.
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Old 03-28-11, 09:30 PM
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Thanks guys. While I still have a thing for having parts match, I think my wife would kill me if I tried to by an entire new groups at once. It's a lot easier to get them one at a time. Of course, the thing I still need to work the most on is the engine.
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Old 03-29-11, 11:02 AM
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I am ambivilent about upgrading components. Generally, the frame and the components are matched for a certain price point. Putting on more expensive components sort of begs the issue about the frame. Also, past a certain point, upgrading components has a pretty small effect. I think that Shimano 105 components give you about 99.9% of the performance of ultegra or dura ace (except for climbing where the weight savings yields about a 1-2% gain). Still, for recreational cyclists, conditioning offers far more room for improvement than spending $$$$$ on the bike.

Now some people like certain key components like a certain wheel set. Fine. Other people like to spend dollars on a high end bike that is a work of art. That is not for me, but I can understand it. That is fine too. Do what you want.
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Old 03-29-11, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Pat View Post
... Still, for recreational cyclists, conditioning offers far more room for improvement than spending $$$$$ on the bike.
Well of course, but spending $$$$$ is easier and more fun than training hard.
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Old 03-29-11, 11:50 AM
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Fix it if it's broken, leave it alone if it's not. want the latest kit, 10 speed 33 speed, etc?
get a whole new bike .. retail on per piece component upgrades is more costly

and so will = new bike price soon.

then there is a Beater Category for the prior one, fit it out for hauling stuff ,
better car substitute for larger loads .
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Old 03-29-11, 12:05 PM
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The beautiful thing about upgrading Shimano (at least before the current 7900 abortion) is that you can mix-n-match while upgrading. The 105, Ultegra and Dura Ace are all interchangeable.

And don't listen to these naysayers--go for the good stuff!
An unlucky combination of desert wind and a well-intentioned (and very kind) volunteer knocked my poor horsey over this weekend and the Dura Ace rear derailleur bore the brunt of the impact. It was badly scratched I spent the rest of the century with my lower gears skipping slightly.
But what the h311, I've been using this same rear derailleur since 2005 (and the bike doesn't spend much time sitting around, I can tell you), so it was probably due for replacement anyway. But when I got home, the skipping was easily adjusted out with a few twists of the adjuster barrel AND I was even able to polish out much of the scratching!
Since June of '05, I've ridden tens of thousands of miles and gone through dozens of chains, a few cables, a few cassettes, and even broke a frame (which Felt replaced free of charge), but I'm still on the original brifters, derailleurs and brake calipers. The stuff just refuses to wear out!


Edit: Ha--here's a photo of my bike just before the desert wind caught the flimsy structure and sent my derailleur careening into the jagged rock poised below it. I was hypothermic and wasn't aware of this at the time. Just let the nice volunteer take the reins of my horsey.

Last edited by calamarichris; 03-31-11 at 10:59 AM.
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