Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Hybrid Bicycles
Reload this Page >

Specialized Roll; a new type hybrid?

Notices
Hybrid Bicycles Where else would you go to discuss these fun, versatile bikes?

Specialized Roll; a new type hybrid?

Old 03-03-22, 06:15 PM
  #251  
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Myrtle Point, Oregon
Posts: 49

Bikes: 2013 Specialized Crossroads Sport, 2018 Specialized Women's Rockhopper Pro

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by prj71
The roll is comfort cruiser bike...with a 67 degree seat tube angle it's going to tougher to pedal up hills.
I tried my son's Roll and found this to be the case. For this reason, my LBS suggested a modified Rockhopper; I'm very happy with the result. If you anticipate "hilly" vs strictly flat rides, you should try out Roll and compare to the Rockhopper or another model with similar geometry. The difference will be very noticeable on rides of any duration.
Suza is offline  
Likes For Suza:
Old 08-17-23, 09:13 PM
  #252  
Senior Member
 
cooperryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Dallas / Ft Worth
Posts: 1,200
Liked 1,680 Times in 438 Posts


Last post was about 17 months ago but I recently bought a Roll and really like it, so I'll revive the thread.

Perhaps there is still some interest with these bikes.

I had rented one previously on vacation two years ago and was impressed.

A good friend bought one recently and I rode it , remembered how much I liked the rental, looked online and found a used one 2 days later.

I'm always tweaking my bikes and the Roll was no exception. My parts bins are pretty deep.

I changed out quite a bit including bars, shifters, grips, stem, rear derailleur, saddle, seatpost , pedals, cassette and added a triple crank.

I had everything on hand but the stem and grips.

I have a front derailleur to install but went out of town but will install it soon.

I'll also probably install lighter tires.

My local bike shop salesman said whenever they get them in they sell out pretty quick.

Mine is 2 years old but looks very lightly used by previous owner.




Last edited by cooperryder; 08-17-23 at 09:36 PM.
cooperryder is offline  
Likes For cooperryder:
Old 08-22-23, 06:12 PM
  #253  
Newbie
 
ManyBikess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Tampa, Fl.
Posts: 27

Bikes: 22 Specilaized Roll 3, 18 Sirrus Carbon, 07 Colnago CLX, 03 KHS 304, 79 Schwinn Super LeTour

Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Bought one today

Roll 3 - EOY clearance, listed for $1099 got it for $750.
Decent bike, rolls very well.
Shortend the bars down 1.5" each side.

Will use it for a combination of short distance around the hood rides and beach cruiser when on vacation.
ManyBikess is offline  
Likes For ManyBikess:
Old 06-21-24, 02:55 PM
  #254  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2024
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thinner tires?

I know this is an old thread but maybe someone can help. I have a Rill 3.0 step through that I love except for the hills. Wondering if I should upgrade to a lighter bike with more speeds or change out the tires? Ideas?
Kcoosh is offline  
Old 06-21-24, 04:24 PM
  #255  
Senior Member
 
cooperryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Dallas / Ft Worth
Posts: 1,200
Liked 1,680 Times in 438 Posts
Originally Posted by Kcoosh
I know this is an old thread but maybe someone can help. I have a Rill 3.0 step through that I love except for the hills. Wondering if I should upgrade to a lighter bike with more speeds or change out the tires? Ideas?
My solution was to convert to a triple crank with a granny gear as pictured on the above thread.

It gets me up the inclines.

Also I switched to lighter tires since I took the above pics, some Challenge Strada Bianca 650b x46 which I think are outstanding. At about 450 grams they are lots lighter than the original tires and I think roll fast.
​​​

cooperryder is offline  
Old 06-30-24, 08:38 AM
  #256  
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 87
Liked 28 Times in 20 Posts
The Roll is a great bike. I agree with cooperryder, the first place to look is not the bike weight, but the gearing, when it comes to hill climbing. The Roll is actually pretty good in this regard, approximately 1:1 ratio in 1st gear, with a 40-tooth chainring and 42-tooth largest cluster ring. If you get a smaller chainring (the front one), say 30-34-tooth, it will help you climb by allowing you to exert more torque through that rear wheel - the ratio of the tooth count front/rear is your gear ratio. Just changing to a smaller chainring should also be a fairly simple/inexpensive modification.. The only thing is, with only one front chainring, you will be shifting the whole gear range lower, and your top gear will also be lower than before. This is not necessarily a big problem, it depends on rider weight, fitness, terrain, preferences, etc. There are plenty of mountain bikes with a single chainring and a *really* low first gear, for example, and you don't need to go that far - but it's something to keep in mind and discuss with a bike mechanic.

An alternative remedy is to switch it to a double or triple chainring setup and add a front derailleur to switch between those chainrings. This is more involved, but would allow a wider gear range - e.g. retaining your current top gear while getting a lower first gear when on the small chainring. Talk to the mechanics at the bike shop to get an idea of what these mods will cost, and also what might make sense for you as a rider for those two/three gear sizes.. It sounds like cooperryder has already done this, maybe he can also share what he got and what his cost was to make the changes?

Last edited by YankeeRider; 06-30-24 at 08:50 AM.
YankeeRider is offline  
Old 07-03-24, 03:52 PM
  #257  
Senior Member
 
cooperryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Dallas / Ft Worth
Posts: 1,200
Liked 1,680 Times in 438 Posts
Originally Posted by YankeeRider
The Roll is a great bike. I agree with cooperryder, the first place to look is not the bike weight, but the gearing, when it comes to hill climbing. The Roll is actually pretty good in this regard, approximately 1:1 ratio in 1st gear, with a 40-tooth chainring and 42-tooth largest cluster ring. If you get a smaller chainring (the front one), say 30-34-tooth, it will help you climb by allowing you to exert more torque through that rear wheel - the ratio of the tooth count front/rear is your gear ratio. Just changing to a smaller chainring should also be a fairly simple/inexpensive modification.. The only thing is, with only one front chainring, you will be shifting the whole gear range lower, and your top gear will also be lower than before. This is not necessarily a big problem, it depends on rider weight, fitness, terrain, preferences, etc. There are plenty of mountain bikes with a single chainring and a *really* low first gear, for example, and you don't need to go that far - but it's something to keep in mind and discuss with a bike mechanic.

An alternative remedy is to switch it to a double or triple chainring setup and add a front derailleur to switch between those chainrings. This is more involved, but would allow a wider gear range - e.g. retaining your current top gear while getting a lower first gear when on the small chainring. Talk to the mechanics at the bike shop to get an idea of what these mods will cost, and also what might make sense for you as a rider for those two/three gear sizes.. It sounds like cooperryder has already done this, maybe he can also share what he got and what his cost was to make the changes?
Hey guys.

I'm always changing up my bikes and do my own wrenching.
As I'm getting up there in years I wanted a triple with a granny gear.

It didn't cost me much as I have a fairly deep parts bins.

I changed the rings around on a triple crank I had on hand.

To add a front derailer you have to fish the housing down the internal routing. It has a hole in the downtown for this as some of these models came with front derailers.

Oh, and if you decide to add a front derailer you need a low mount one.

I can look up the model of the Shimano I used if interested.

The thing I didn't have was an under the bottom bracket cable guide to route the cable up to the front derailer after I had fished it down the downtube.

They are not expensive ( $10 range maybe) but I had to order one.

I can look up the one I used if you are interested.

Good luck.

By the way I got the weight of mine down by at least 3 pounds.


If all that sounds too complicated you can achieve similar gearing with a 1x set up using a smaller crank chainring in combination with perhaps a cassette with big cog of 36 teeth .

Mine was a 7 speed rear cassette and an 8 speed would not fit.

I know Rivendell Bicycle Works did sell a 7 speed cassette with a 36 T cog even offering a 40 and 42 if you need it .

Sometimes a larger big cog requires a different rear derailer.

Last edited by cooperryder; 07-03-24 at 04:05 PM.
cooperryder is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
kjmillig
Hybrid Bicycles
47
04-27-20 08:44 AM
Mr_Christopher
Touring
7
09-09-16 08:57 PM
ScubaGuy71
Hybrid Bicycles
10
07-27-16 01:08 PM
exwhyzed
Hybrid Bicycles
3
09-10-15 09:28 AM
saintjb
Hybrid Bicycles
2
12-26-12 08:53 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.