Notices
Long Distance Competition/Ultracycling, Randonneuring and Endurance Cycling Do you enjoy centuries, double centuries, brevets, randonnees, and 24-hour time trials? Share ride reports, and exchange training, equipment, and nutrition information specific to long distance cycling. This isn't for tours, this is for endurance events cycling

Endurance Riding Bike Selection

Old 09-02-23, 06:22 AM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 77
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 40 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 14 Posts
Endurance Riding Bike Selection

I am truly interested in doing more distance type rides, including some long rail trail rides.

From my online searching, though, I do not see bikes that are designed for this type of riding that are reasonably light.

The bikes that I see that are light usually have high Road gearing. The bikes with the lower gearing on the other hand seem to be heavier.

What are some bike choices you would recommend or is it necessary to customize or build a bike for these purposes?

Thanks
Basstar is offline  
Old 09-02-23, 10:10 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
clasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 2,735
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 229 Post(s)
Liked 147 Times in 102 Posts
Light bikes aren't a big advantage on most brevets, aero is more important since it's "always on" so to speak. Gravel "race" bikes tend to be lighter than the regular versions, something like that salsa warroad vs the warbird. Most endurance road bikes are great rando bikes, and lower gearing is as easy getting a 48/31 or 46/30 crank/chainrings, and/or an 11-34 cassette works with most shimano road groups now.
clasher is offline  
Likes For clasher:
Old 09-04-23, 04:16 AM
  #3  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 77
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 40 Post(s)
Liked 26 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by clasher
Light bikes aren't a big advantage on most brevets, aero is more important since it's "always on" so to speak. Gravel "race" bikes tend to be lighter than the regular versions, something like that salsa warroad vs the warbird. Most endurance road bikes are great rando bikes, and lower gearing is as easy getting a 48/31 or 46/30 crank/chainrings, and/or an 11-34 cassette works with most shimano road groups now.
Thanks so much for the tips and the explanation.

Iím a bit new and age wise a bit late to the cycling world so I have a ton to learn.
Basstar is offline  
Old 09-04-23, 07:30 AM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2021
Posts: 4,083
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2332 Post(s)
Liked 2,090 Times in 1,309 Posts
I was dreaming about doing an off road endurance race and the Specialized S-works Diverge STR was on my radar. It is about $750/lb but has suspension front and rear

Bikes like these generally will have large tires and rims, which weight at least a pound more compared to a road bike. If your requirements add suspension, then the bike gets heavy

I am of the opinion that much of the energy from sharp vertical movements are absorbed into one's body tissue. A suspended bike with proper tires and pressure should be more efficient and help ward off the trashed out fatigue that always comes.

If you want more road and less trail, the Trek Domane SLR 2023 version might be of interest, I think they ditched the suspension up front but kept the one on the rear. The top of the line version is under 17 lbs.
GhostRider62 is offline  
Likes For GhostRider62:
Old 09-13-23, 08:05 PM
  #5  
Professional Fuss-Budget
 
Bacciagalupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,494
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 32 Post(s)
Liked 24 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by Basstar
I am truly interested in doing more distance type rides, including some long rail trail rides.

From my online searching, though, I do not see bikes that are designed for this type of riding that are reasonably light.
What qualifies as "reasonably light?" It should be pretty easy to get a 22 lb aluminum bike, or a 20 lb CF bike.

How much are you willing to spend to shave a few pounds off the bike? Are you willing to spend $15,000 for a 13 pound Aethos?

Why are you worried about weight anyway? Lighter bikes aren't faster, unless you are Everesting.


What are some bike choices you would recommend or is it necessary to customize or build a bike for these purposes?
What is your purpose? 100 miles on pavement? 200 miles? 300 miles? Are you planning on tons of climbing? Are you trying to be fast, or competitive, or just finish a long distance event?
Bacciagalupe is offline  
Likes For Bacciagalupe:
Old 09-13-23, 08:44 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
jadmt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Missoula MT
Posts: 1,278

Bikes: Handsome xoxo, Serotta atx, Canyon Endurace CF8

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 569 Post(s)
Liked 1,332 Times in 604 Posts
Check out something like a canyon endurace cf7 or cf8 under 20lbs and can do rough roads or gravel but still cruise at ~20mph. Very comfortable bike to do 100 miles on.
jadmt is offline  
Likes For jadmt:
Old 09-14-23, 02:56 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 10,753

Bikes: 1961 Ideor, 1966 Perfekt 3 Speed AB Hub, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad MkII, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 2017 Lynskey Backroad, 2017 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer. Others are now gone.

Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3249 Post(s)
Liked 1,316 Times in 1,034 Posts
Before you get too deep into selections based on weight, think about tire clearance.

I regularly ride three different rail trails, one has a fairly hard packed surface and I often use 32mm wide tires which my rando bike has. But one trail often has a bit more mud or soft spots, for that rail trail I usually use my light touring bike with 37mm wide tires, they handle the soft spots better. And one rail trail often has washouts and erosion problems, sometimes it is maintained with loose sand in the eroded areas, any tire gets questionable. That said, I think a lot of bikes with 37 to 40mm wide tires would work quite well for most people that want to ride most rail trails. I would not suggest anything narrower for a maximum clearance for a bike that is intended for that purpose.

Talk to others that ride the same trails that you are interested in, ask them what tire widths they like for the trails.

You want a bike frame and fork that can take the maximum width that you might want to use.

Later you might consider a second set of wheels if you want to use the bike for paved roads too. I can't comment on the cost of a second set of wheels, you likely are looking at a through axle bike, that could rule out older used budget wheel sets.
Tourist in MSN is offline  
Likes For Tourist in MSN:
Old 11-06-23, 04:19 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Oz
Posts: 909

Bikes: Curve Grovel v2 ti

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 249 Post(s)
Liked 79 Times in 70 Posts
Originally Posted by GhostRider62
I was dreaming about doing an off road endurance race and the Specialized S-works Diverge STR was on my radar.
Jack Thompson an ultra-cyclist, will be attempting a record run on the Munda Biddi in a couple weeks, on a STR.

Hope the temps stay down a bit for his run.
tangerineowl is offline  
Likes For tangerineowl:
Old 11-18-23, 09:57 AM
  #9  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2023
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Helpful Thread

Helpful Thread
picaf is offline  
Likes For picaf:
Old 11-27-23, 07:14 AM
  #10  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2023
Location: Florida
Posts: 31

Bikes: Basso Diamante SV (2021), Trek Speed Concept SLR7 (2023), Trek Madone SLR7 (2023), Time Alpe D'Huez (2023)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 8 Posts
I am a long-distance / ultra-distance cyclist, and I like "endurance" bikes for this purpose (generally speaking). However, over the past few years "endurance" geometry has gotten progressively more relaxed (i.e. slacker head tube angles, taller stack, shorter reach), the handlebars have gotten wider, and tire clearance has increased. It's reached a point where "endurance" bikes are now marketed as dual-purpose bikes suitable for road and gravel. This is all very well and nice if you are a road cyclist with very poor flexibility or someone who actively rides road and gravel. For the rest of us, the "endurance" category has left us behind.

I mention this because I recently had to replace my "endurance / gravel" bike, which was a 2020 Basso Palta. Basso originally marketed the Palta as a gravel bike, but it's geometry and overall design was (more or less) a relaxed version of Basso's road geometry with wider tire clearance for gravel applications. It made for an awesome endurance bike on paved surfaces, which was my primary use. As a gravel bike, it was average at best and should have never been marketed for gravel. However, since 2020 the Palta's geometry has gotten much slacker. It is now firmly in the gravel category and no longer suitable for serious road riding.

As I began my search for a replacement bike for long-distance and ultra-distance events I quickly found myself looking at full-on aero bikes and climbing bikes. Since 2020 road bike geometry has gotten more relaxed as manufacturers have realized that mere mortals aren't comfortable (for any distance) stretched out and folded over like a taco with a flat back. As a result, the stack on race bikes in 2023 / 2024 is now slightly taller and the reach slightly shorter, to the point that a reasonably flexible club-level rider can (in many cases) be properly fit on a super-sexy aero or climbing race bike. I'm not so thrilled about the head tube angles dipping below 72 degrees on some race bikes or chainstays growing longer than 410mm (but that is personal preference).

Long-story short, I ended up purchasing a Time Alpe D'Huez (disc) frameset. It's marketed as a "climbing" bike, which is no surprise based on the model name. However, I live in Florida. I primarily train and race in Florida. I am not a climber and will not be using this bike for climbing. The geometry of the Time Alpe D'Huez, which in my opinion is ideal for use as an "endurance" bike, is what got my attention.

The lesson learned and the main takeaway from my recent experience of having to replace my endurance bike is: Don't pay attention to the marketing or the category labels. Pay close attention to the geometry charts and buy that which fits you and your intended riding style. This approach should open your search to more possibilities, and you might be surprised what you find.

Last edited by Turnin_Wrenches; 11-27-23 at 07:19 AM.
Turnin_Wrenches is offline  
Likes For Turnin_Wrenches:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.