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What glue or something I should to use for tubeless tire?

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What glue or something I should to use for tubeless tire?

Old 11-19-23, 07:23 PM
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What glue or something I should to use for tubeless tire?

So i had my tubuless wheels and last owner did glue them that tires cant to go out rim and i did unglue it and need to glue it again
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Old 11-19-23, 07:36 PM
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I’ve never heard of modern tubeless tires getting glued onto a rim. With a good tubeless rim and tire design, they seal fine without. Find a different shop
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Old 11-19-23, 07:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Cool_Mark
... i did unglue it and need to glue it again
No.

Don't.

No, no, nononononononononononono, you don't need to do that.

Tubeless tires don't need to be glued to anything. They are designed to stay on the rims they're fitted to by mechanical interaction between the beads on the tires and the inner surfaces of the rims they're fitted to.

Even if tubes are needed (to keep air in them because of a bad rim tape job) the tires do not need gluing to stay on the rims.
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Old 11-19-23, 08:07 PM
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Dried sealant looks like glue but it's not glue.
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Old 11-19-23, 08:09 PM
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No glue at all. You probably are talking sealant maybe and like chain lube every has an opinion and they are probably all wrong and also all right. I would go for Orange Seal as I have used that a lot over the years for different people and it is made in 'Murica.

Again to be clear no glue.

Also when you install your tires make sure they seat first before you add sealant. NEVER add sealant before your tires are seated because if something goes wrong you could have a sealant explosion and waste money and sealant and cleaners you didn't need to. Make sure it can hold air before you test fluids.
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Old 11-20-23, 06:42 AM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes
Make sure it can hold air before you test fluids.
Words to ride with in mind!
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Old 11-20-23, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes
Also when you install your tires make sure they seat first before you add sealant. NEVER add sealant before your tires are seated because if something goes wrong you could have a sealant explosion and waste money and sealant and cleaners you didn't need to. Make sure it can hold air before you test fluids.
At least one sealant manufacturer requires exactly the opposite technique.

Originally Posted by https://silca.cc/products/ultimate-tubeless-sealant-w-fiberfoam
Must be poured into tire during install
Not injector compatible (It seals holes bigger than
your valve)
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Old 11-20-23, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes
Also when you install your tires make sure they seat first before you add sealant. NEVER add sealant before your tires are seated because if something goes wrong you could have a sealant explosion and waste money and sealant and cleaners you didn't need to. Make sure it can hold air before you test fluids.
Meh. I've been skipping the test inflation, and adding sealant before the first inflation. There's a couple of times when the sealant did its job, and helped the tires seal and seat. I understand the risks if something goes wrong. If they aren't sealing and seating, they aren't going to hold enough air pressure to cause a catastrophic explosion.
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Old 11-20-23, 07:13 PM
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Originally Posted by TC1
At least one sealant manufacturer requires exactly the opposite technique.
Fair dinkum on that one. But I would still probably test it first and then remove some of the bead and install.

Originally Posted by Eric F
Meh. I've been skipping the test inflation, and adding sealant before the first inflation. There's a couple of times when the sealant did its job, and helped the tires seal and seat. I understand the risks if something goes wrong. If they aren't sealing and seating, they aren't going to hold enough air pressure to cause a catastrophic explosion.
Ahh I have seen some inflations blow up. I wouldn't recommend it but you gotta do you.
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Old 11-20-23, 09:49 PM
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I'm really really.......................really hoping your are confusing tubeless sealant with 'glue'. No tire should be glued to a wheel unless it is a sewup tire that is glued onto a rim that is only used for sewups or tubular tires.
Likely as has been said you are mistaking sealant for glue...it's not lol.
I recommend removing the tires from the rim, peeling...fingers work well...the dried sealant off the inside of the tires and rim then cleaning the remaining sealant from the inside of the tires...they make a 'solvent' but I use a pan with warm water and Dawn...yep if it's good for ducks, etc...with a scrubby sponge. Clean off as much as you can, wipe dry and install on the wheel/rim...after it is cleaned as well. Use a good floor pump or a compressor to 'seat'/'mount' the tire on the rim then either pour the correct amount of a good quality sealant either through the valve...remove the core first and replace with a new core if able...or as I prefer, use a tire lever to pop a few inches of the tire from the rim and pour the correct amount of sealant directly into that space and carefully/slowly rotate the wheel to spread the sealant. Then pop that section of tire back and inflate.
There are lots of YouTube videos showing exactly how to do this...GCN does a very good job imo.

Sealant also does not last forever and will dry after some time requiring a 'recharge' of sealant...I always peal the old, dried sealant before adding fresh sealant but many don't bother...I am a bit of a 'neat freak' but that is me...do what you want.

PS: I always make sure to clean off dried sealant from the tire's bead/edges. I prefer a good seal at the bead and cleaning off any old, dried sealant will assure a good seal.
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Old 11-21-23, 05:39 AM
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Is there any chance you are talking about sew ups (tubular tires)? Otherwise, yeah, no glue ever.

As far as testing before sealant... I have often had some leakage until sealant was added and the sealant fixed it up. I have sometimes added sealant first and think that is fine, never had a problem with it.
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Old 11-27-23, 08:21 AM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
Is there any chance you are talking about sew ups (tubular tires)? h it.
Were tubulars ever a thing on mountain bikes though?
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Old 11-27-23, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
Were tubulars ever a thing on mountain bikes though?
Yes, not that common, but they did and still do exist.
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Old 11-27-23, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
Were tubulars ever a thing on mountain bikes though?
Only on pro XC rigs for a few years.
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Old 11-28-23, 05:49 AM
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Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets
Only on pro XC rigs for a few years.
I don't know anyone who runs them, but I still see them for sale. Tufo is one that apparently still sells sewup MTB wheels. Googling "tubular mtb tires" brings up quite a few hits that look like currently available stock.

But, yeah almost everyone runs clinchers (tubeless or with tubes). Tubular is and has been rare on mountain bikes.

I only brought it up because the OP seemed to think the tires were glued on. Tubeless could have been one possibility. Error on his part about them being glued on was more likely though.
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