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Going up a hill on a recumbent

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Going up a hill on a recumbent

Old 01-13-23, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by BlazingPedals
Tomato Coupe probably views the forums by 'most recent posts,' and doesn't even realize he's in the Recumbent forum.
Actually, I got a notice that someone quoted a very old post of mine.

Originally Posted by rydabent
Some of the DF riders sure get cranky with the pain in the ass that their bike seats give them. They sure dont like to be reminded about it either!!!!!!
Does making fun of an old crank count as getting cranky?
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Old 01-16-23, 03:08 PM
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe
Actually, I got a notice that someone quoted a very old post of mine.



Does making fun of an old crank count as getting cranky?
Actually old people are not cranky. We just tell the truth as we see it, and no longer care if someone is offended.
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Old 08-09-23, 01:54 PM
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Concentrate and put more effort on the upstroke (pulling) rather than the downstroke (pushing). Keep your RPMs up but not too high as to lose forward momentum.
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Old 08-10-23, 01:25 PM
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As I tell people, downshifting makes you go slower. I suppose it's OK if you're already going slower. But yes, downshift as needed to maintain your cadence at what speed you can, until you either hit an equilibrium speed or you get to the top.
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Old 08-10-23, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by rydabent
Some people may need to stop, but the hills I encounter I do not. Nor have I ever walked a bike or trike up a hill.
Are you riding a conventional or an electric trike? I've seen a number of people around here coasting up long hills on electric recumbents.
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Old 08-12-23, 05:48 AM
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Originally Posted by pjgonwa
Concentrate and put more effort on the upstroke (pulling) rather than the downstroke (pushing). Keep your RPMs up but not too high as to lose forward momentum.
I still don't have this down in the muscle memory, only been riding with cleats for less than a year. When it does come to mind, harder with the brain injury, I give it my all pushing and pulling, & it grows unbelievably easier!
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Old 08-14-23, 08:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Trakhak
Are you riding a conventional or an electric trike? I've seen a number of people around here coasting up long hills on electric recumbents.
You say that, but on Endless Sphere you can SEE what happens to 500W - 1000W motors if you don't help them A LOT when going up long hills. Spoiler: it isn't pretty. You are just repeating trope wisdom about how little work the riders of e-anythings do.

Last edited by Leisesturm; 08-14-23 at 10:02 PM.
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Old 08-14-23, 11:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm
You say that, but on Endless Sphere you can SEE what happens to 500W - 1000W motors if you don't help them A LOT when going up long hills. Spoiler: it isn't pretty. You are just repeating trope wisdom about how little work the riders of e-anythings do.
I didn't write "steep hills" - I wrote "long hills," meaning a couple of hundred yards. I haven't yet seen any in use out where I mostly ride, in very hilly Baltimore County.

I wonder if pedal assist is likely to be increasingly outsold by throttle ebikes.
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Old 08-17-23, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Trakhak
.......I wonder if pedal assist is likely to be increasingly outsold by throttle ebikes.
I think that it all comes down to intended use. If you just want "ease of use" (ie - minimal effort) get an ebike with a throttle. If you are looking for exercise out of your ebike, with a bit of "oomph" when needed, get pedal assist.

Different strokes for different folks. They both have their plusses and minuses.
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Old 08-17-23, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by newbert
I think that it all comes down to intended use. If you just want "ease of use" (ie - minimal effort) get an ebike with a throttle. If you are looking for exercise out of your ebike, with a bit of "oomph" when needed, get pedal assist.

Different strokes for different folks. They both have their plusses and minuses.
Given that the obesity epidemic must have physicians telling millions of older patients that, no kidding, you've got to do some regular exercise if you want to outlast green bananas, my bet is that those patients will embrace not the spirit but the letter of the advice - and will head straight for the throttle bikes. We'll probably see very few pedal assist bikes being sold a couple of years from now.
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Old 03-19-24, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by tomato coupe
Get that memory checked ...
How does your post add to the thread.
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Old 03-19-24, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by rydabent
How does your post add to the thread.
Sweet irony. You're responding to a post ...

... that's more than a year old ...
... that you already responded to ...
... that was about you responding to another post more than once.

Last edited by tomato coupe; 03-19-24 at 10:12 AM.
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Old 05-14-24, 03:27 AM
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I have a customer in Southern California with a new to him R-84. He has a triple 50/36/24 and 11/34 in the rear. He wants to get a more modern crank(maybe CF) and BB since the current square taper is worn out . I see a good mix of double and triples out there, so my question is does one really need more than 1 to 1 for a low gear. On his bike with a 50/34 he could have a 28 inch lowest gear. Should that be low enough for your average cyclist that isn't headed to the mountains?
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Old 05-19-24, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by ClayH
I have a customer in Southern California with a new to him R-84. He has a triple 50/36/24 and 11/34 in the rear. He wants to get a more modern crank(maybe CF) and BB since the current square taper is worn out . I see a good mix of double and triples out there, so my question is does one really need more than 1 to 1 for a low gear. On his bike with a 50/34 he could have a 28 inch lowest gear. Should that be low enough for your average cyclist that isn't headed to the mountains?
You haven't told us anything about your customer. How old is s/he? Fit? Not? Even flat geography can have local features (overpasses, wind) that make the case for a wider gear spread.
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Old 05-29-24, 07:16 PM
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There have been a few times that even a 30/32 on a 26" wheel wasn't low enough for me. OTOH, it starts getting hard to balance going so slow that a 23-inch gear is needed. OTOH, a 24/34 gear is insanely low to me. Maybe your customer should get the 50/34 system, and then have a separate wheel with a 46/11 cassette for the one or two times a year he might use it.
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