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The New Domane SLR or Is Carbon Comfortable Enough Yet?

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The New Domane SLR or Is Carbon Comfortable Enough Yet?

Old 04-04-16, 11:50 AM
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Jarrett2
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The New Domane SLR or Is Carbon Comfortable Enough Yet?

I have to admit, this made me laugh:

Trek Domane SLR with front and rear IsoSpeed launched - BikeRadar

2017 Trek Domane SLR: full tech details and first impressions | CyclingTips

So carbon fiber replaces steel bikes. Then people ride them for a few years and figured out they are too uncomfortable as they are. So manufacturers add vibration dampeners and vertically compliant seat posts, but that's not enough. Finally Trek creates the Domane with a seat tube that actually flexes a little. Hmm, that sounds familiar.

But then the front end is too stiff, so they make a new Domane where the seat tube flexes a little bit AND the steerer tube flexes some as well. Hmm, a frame designed so that it has some compliance built into it. That sounds familiar again. Not only that, they made the tire clearance great so you can also run bigger, more cushy tires on it.

So for between $5,000 - $11,000, Trek has made a carbon bike that *might* be as comfortable as a $500 steel road bike. Hmm
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Old 04-04-16, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
I have to admit, this made me laugh:

Trek Domane SLR with front and rear IsoSpeed launched - BikeRadar

2017 Trek Domane SLR: full tech details and first impressions | CyclingTips

So carbon fiber replaces steel bikes. Then people ride them for a few years and figured out they are too uncomfortable as they are. So manufacturers add vibration dampeners and vertically compliant seat posts, but that's not enough. Finally Trek creates the Domane with a seat tube that actually flexes a little. Hmm, that sounds familiar.

But then the front end is too stiff, so they make a new Domane where the seat tube flexes a little bit AND the steerer tube flexes some as well. Hmm, a frame designed so that it has some compliance built into it. That sounds familiar again. Not only that, they made the tire clearance great so you can also run bigger, more cushy tires on it.

So for between $5,000 - $11,000, Trek has made a carbon bike that *might* be as comfortable as a $500 steel road bike. Hmm
You should contact Trek's engineering team and tell them
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Old 04-04-16, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Elvo View Post
You should contact Trek's engineering team and tell them
I have to admit, this made me laugh.
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Old 04-04-16, 01:07 PM
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I never had the chance to own a steel road bike as I was always into BMX and mountain biking up until a few years ago so I never was able to appreciate a good steel frame. (I would still love to own a columbus tubed bike, however, as I think they are beautiful)
Had the chance to test the new Domane SLR out last week and was really amazed at how it works. The control to change the stiffness is really cool. You can make it absorb so much or stiffen it up so it does not feel as "lazy" in the bends.

I know a lot of people who said the previous domane felt dead to them and I can understand. Definitely think the new design is way better and will allow you to have the best of both worlds. You can ride a stiffer frame for when you are on normal pavement or smooth trails and adjust the dampening for when the roads go south in quality or you are on a vacation in Belgium.

Really enjoyed it for the little time I had with it and look forward to going on a longer ride with one now that is released officially.
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Old 04-04-16, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
I have to admit, this made me laugh:

Trek Domane SLR with front and rear IsoSpeed launched - BikeRadar

2017 Trek Domane SLR: full tech details and first impressions | CyclingTips

So carbon fiber replaces steel bikes. Then people ride them for a few years and figured out they are too uncomfortable as they are. So manufacturers add vibration dampeners and vertically compliant seat posts, but that's not enough. Finally Trek creates the Domane with a seat tube that actually flexes a little. Hmm, that sounds familiar.

But then the front end is too stiff, so they make a new Domane where the seat tube flexes a little bit AND the steerer tube flexes some as well. Hmm, a frame designed so that it has some compliance built into it. That sounds familiar again. Not only that, they made the tire clearance great so you can also run bigger, more cushy tires on it.

So for between $5,000 - $11,000, Trek has made a carbon bike that *might* be as comfortable as a $500 steel road bike. Hmm
So you exclusively ride $500 steel bikes? Nothing more, because that would be a waste, right?

Also, I love a good steel frame as much as the next guy, but I've never seen a steel road bike that could be set up for rider weight/preference. Come to think of it, I guess I've never seen any road bike that could be set up for rider weight until now.
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Old 04-04-16, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Elvo View Post
You should contact Trek's engineering team and tell them
Nah, the marketing team is pushing this deal. Very smart of them as well.

Nothing sexy about another steel bike, but a new carbon layup, omgeees!!! Where do I throw my money?
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Old 04-04-16, 01:14 PM
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Originally Posted by WalksOn2Wheels View Post
Also, I love a good steel frame as much as the next guy, but I've never seen a steel road bike that could be set up for rider weight/preference. Come to think of it, I guess I've never seen any road bike that could be set up for rider weight until now.
Have you felt that feature was missing up until now?

Knowledgeable builders have been building for rider weight/preference for decades.

Last edited by Jarrett2; 04-04-16 at 01:18 PM.
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Old 04-04-16, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
Nah, the marketing team is pushing this deal. Very smart of them as well.

Nothing sexy about another steel bike, but a new carbon layup, omgeees!!! Where do I throw my money?
Here! Throw your money here! <opens up pocket> I want one of those new SLRs!
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Old 04-04-16, 01:17 PM
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Old 04-04-16, 01:24 PM
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Steel structure's properties can't be manipulated the way carbon structure's properties can. Thats not marketing. Thats fact.
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Old 04-04-16, 01:27 PM
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Old 04-04-16, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
Have you felt that feature was missing up until now?

Knowledgeable builders have been building for rider weight/preference for decades.
Obviously. For a custom built frame for a specific rider. If you want a very specific feel on a frame, you have to somehow manage to ride all materials possible on all different types of builds. Here is a road bike that will work well for basically any rider right off the rack. Not just in terms of size, but in terms of comfort and road feel. On ONE bike.

I'm not disagreeing with the fact that a $500 dollar steel frame isn't awesome. I'm just saying that specific frame is going to work for a pretty narrow range in terms of rider weight and preference. Which is fine if you've got 10+ years of experience riding numerous frames and tubesets to find what you like. Or, you know, you could get a Domane, turn a bolt and move a slider up and down until it feels awesome and then keep riding. It may not be for you, but you can't sit and laugh as if it's not something customers will find to be an attractive and useful feature.
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Old 04-04-16, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
I have to admit, this made me laugh:

Trek Domane SLR with front and rear IsoSpeed launched - BikeRadar

2017 Trek Domane SLR: full tech details and first impressions | CyclingTips

So carbon fiber replaces steel bikes. Then people ride them for a few years and figured out they are too uncomfortable as they are. So manufacturers add vibration dampeners and vertically compliant seat posts, but that's not enough. Finally Trek creates the Domane with a seat tube that actually flexes a little. Hmm, that sounds familiar.

But then the front end is too stiff, so they make a new Domane where the seat tube flexes a little bit AND the steerer tube flexes some as well. Hmm, a frame designed so that it has some compliance built into it. That sounds familiar again. Not only that, they made the tire clearance great so you can also run bigger, more cushy tires on it.

So for between $5,000 - $11,000, Trek has made a carbon bike that *might* be as comfortable as a $500 steel road bike. Hmm
To be honest I don't really think that this tech is going to change the bikes in the future. I'd say probably the 80% of this is marketing and I think it's hard to justify to buy a bike just for this feature. On the other hand I have no idea how you found any connections in this article to steel frames or comparing the comfort of the domane to them. Also I do believe that any of Trek's mid level carbon offering will offer superior comfort and ride compared to a $500 steel bike (I owned and rode both). Obviously the earlier costs more, but it's up to you if it's worth it.
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Old 04-04-16, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by WalksOn2Wheels View Post
you can't sit and laugh as if it's not something customers will find to be an attractive and useful feature.
Oh, I can sit and laugh Especially when they have to use wacky engineering to solve a problem inherent in the material that they've repeatedly told customers was the best of the best in years past.

I'm sure customers will find it attractive. They've been trained by marketing to find new carbon things attractive.

Find it useful? Eh. Might check back with owners after a few months to see how many times they've touched that 4mm screw
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Old 04-04-16, 01:48 PM
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There's some serious pro-steel agenda and I can't tell if it's just old people who can't let go or if it belongs to the person that is just dollar conscious. I mean, yeah, of course, $11,000 bicycles are stupid for everyone out there except the man who has everything else already. But to say a $500 steel frame from yester-years competes with it is kinda hokey.
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Old 04-04-16, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
I have to admit, this made me laugh:

Trek Domane SLR with front and rear IsoSpeed launched - BikeRadar

2017 Trek Domane SLR: full tech details and first impressions | CyclingTips

So carbon fiber replaces steel bikes. Then people ride them for a few years and figured out they are too uncomfortable as they are. So manufacturers add vibration dampeners and vertically compliant seat posts, but that's not enough. Finally Trek creates the Domane with a seat tube that actually flexes a little. Hmm, that sounds familiar.

But then the front end is too stiff, so they make a new Domane where the seat tube flexes a little bit AND the steerer tube flexes some as well. Hmm, a frame designed so that it has some compliance built into it. That sounds familiar again. Not only that, they made the tire clearance great so you can also run bigger, more cushy tires on it.

So for between $5,000 - $11,000, Trek has made a carbon bike that *might* be as comfortable as a $500 steel road bike. Hmm
Lots of carbon bikes are just as comfortable as a good steel bike with the added benefits of being lighter and quicker feeling (stiffer in the drivetrain).

My Emonda is just as nice as a riding road bike as my many steel bikes, but it's lighter and faster....and surprisingly cheaper to buy.

I really love steel bikes, but a good carbon bike is great too. There is room for both materials in bike-dom. But honestly, a $500 steel bike is still a pile compared to a $2000 or more steel bike.

Trek, with this new Domane, is making a bike that can be setup to be very compliant (for long efforts like a century or beyond) or setup stiffer for the hour long club ride. Sounds fine to me. I can see certain riders wanting a feature like that.


When I was shopping for a new road bike I test rode the Domane 5.9 and I honestly felt that bike was not only as smooth riding as my Rivendell Roadeo, but was lighter and quicker up hills.

Last edited by RJM; 04-04-16 at 02:00 PM.
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Old 04-04-16, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by RJM View Post
My Emonda is just as nice as a riding road bike as my many steel bikes
I can only assume when someone makes this type of statement that they are blessed with some really smooth roads in their area.

My time on a Emonda didn't yield the same belief. I couldn't get off of it quickly enough once the road became less than smooth.

I spoke with a woman at a cycling event yesterday that said she had sold her old steel bike and got a new aluminum bike with a carbon fork recently. She thought that something was wrong with her new bike because when she started going fast on it, the front end would rattle and shake on chip seal roads and her old bike didn't do that.
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Old 04-04-16, 02:05 PM
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If the Emonda is so smooth, why would Trek need to revamp this Domane to be even more comfortable?
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Old 04-04-16, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
If the Emonda is so smooth, why would Trek need to revamp this Domane to be even more comfortable?
If you have one friend who eats only real, non processed food and another friend who is a vegan, who is the better person? The one who isn't constantly an a-hole about it and has to constantly tell you why everything you're eating is awful and you should feel awful.

Look, we're all very happy that you like your steel bikes and find no need for a carbon bike. That's awesome, really. We're glad that you're glad. Take a moment to embrace the philosophy of "Live and let live" and just walk away from this silliness.
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Old 04-04-16, 02:13 PM
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Originally Posted by topslop1 View Post
There's some serious pro-steel agenda and I can't tell if it's just old people who can't let go or if it belongs to the person that is just dollar conscious. I mean, yeah, of course, $11,000 bicycles are stupid for everyone out there except the man who has everything else already. But to say a $500 steel frame from yester-years competes with it is kinda hokey.
It is amazing, isn't it? I think certain people just love telling themselves that they know better.
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Old 04-04-16, 02:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
If the Emonda is so smooth, why would Trek need to revamp this Domane to be even more comfortable?
The Emonda has a different geometry and purpose compared to the Domane...the Madone has another different purpose (aero).

The majority of riding on my new bike is to hammer two hour club rides or solo interval puke fests, which the Emonda is suited greatly for. To tell you the truth, when I am riding like that I don't have the time or the inclination to think about road surfaces and how uncomfortable they are. (The Emonda is better at this than my last bike...it's quicker) If I was going to be going cruising on 5 hour long rides at a more moderate tempo I would be more inclined to purchase the Domane. It's still a fine bike with a more relaxed geometry and it is more comfortable over rougher roads.


So far, the Emonda has been fine for the roads where I ride (which aren't glass smooth, but they aren't busted up either), but I'm not riding gravel stuff with it, nor have I taken it down any cobbled streets.

Last edited by RJM; 04-04-16 at 02:19 PM.
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Old 04-04-16, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by WalksOn2Wheels View Post
Take a moment to embrace the philosophy of "Live and let live" and just walk away from this silliness.
lol, it's a discussion forum about road bikes. This is the newest announced road bike that I'm aware of. We're having a discussion about it, its engineering, its cost, relevance, how it compares to other road bikes, etc.

If this is a discussion you do not wish to read or continue to participate in, are you sure that I am the one that needs to walk away?
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Old 04-04-16, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
I can only assume when someone makes this type of statement that they are blessed with some really smooth roads in their area.

My time on a Emonda didn't yield the same belief. I couldn't get off of it quickly enough once the road became less than smooth.

I spoke with a woman at a cycling event yesterday that said she had sold her old steel bike and got a new aluminum bike with a carbon fork recently. She thought that something was wrong with her new bike because when she started going fast on it, the front end would rattle and shake on chip seal roads and her old bike didn't do that.
Why didn't she test ride her bike before purchasing it?

I honestly don't find the Emonda harsh at all and I'm coming from a Rivendell Roadeo, so if there were some huge difference in jarring ride quality, I think I would be feeling it.
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Old 04-04-16, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
lol, it's a discussion forum about road bikes. This is the newest announced road bike that I'm aware of. We're having a discussion about it, its engineering, its cost, relevance, how it compares to other road bikes, etc.

If this is a discussion you do not wish to read or continue to participate in, are you sure that I am the one that needs to walk away?
No, I tried having a conversation about it, but after each time I tried to engage in a discussion you came back with a variation of "It's stupid and people who want it are stupid." So I don't get the impression that you're looking for a discussion as much as you are looking for someone to unequivocally agree with you.
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Old 04-04-16, 02:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
If the Emonda is so smooth, why would Trek need to revamp this Domane to be even more comfortable?
Because there's a range and different people fall in different places along that range. You didn't know that?
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