Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Suspension stem for road bikes that actually works

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Suspension stem for road bikes that actually works

Old 11-06-16, 11:44 AM
  #1  
vinuneuro
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: NW Chicagoland
Posts: 783

Bikes: 2016 Diverge Expert

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 389 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Suspension stem for road bikes that actually works

I had been seriously considering getting the next model Diverge whenever they put the 2017 Roubaix's headset design in it. But came across this, and it seems to be a genuinely well thought out design that's streamlined and effective. Probably not 100% of the effectiveness of the new Roubaix but I'll take the saved $$ if it gets most of the way there.

No affiliation with the company, someone posted it on another board. It's a start-up company, and their other products seem have good reviews.

https://www.redshiftsports.com/shockstop


Last edited by vinuneuro; 11-06-16 at 11:47 AM.
vinuneuro is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 11:57 AM
  #2  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,553

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4899 Post(s)
Liked 1,703 Times in 947 Posts
I remember seeing Shockstop on one of the crowdfunding sites 3-4 years ago, interesting to see it's still not in production. I think that alone should tell you something about it. I personally don't like suspension bits that alter geometry-- and Shockstop would change stack and reach every time you hit a bump. Just get a frame/fork that can accommodate wider tires. Same effect, no changes in geometry.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 12:05 PM
  #3  
FBOATSB 
Senior Member
 
FBOATSB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 1,863

Bikes: Old Stuff

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 714 Post(s)
Liked 177 Times in 135 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
I remember seeing Shockstop on one of the crowdfunding sites 3-4 years ago, interesting to see it's still not in production. I think that alone should tell you something about it. I personally don't like suspension bits that alter geometry-- and Shockstop would change stack and reach every time you hit a bump. Just get a frame/fork that can accommodate wider tires. Same effect, no changes in geometry.
^This....Unless that squishy stem thingy can make me 30 years younger
FBOATSB is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 12:18 PM
  #4  
BobbyG
Senior Member
 
BobbyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Posts: 5,261

Bikes: 2015 Charge Plug, 2007 Dahon Boardwalk, 1997 Nishiki Blazer, 1984 Nishiki International

Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1155 Post(s)
Liked 976 Times in 477 Posts
I put pipe insulation foam tubes on my handle bars. That's more for cramping than for shock absorbstion, but when the tubes are fresh they do a real nice job of cusioning.
BobbyG is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 12:38 PM
  #5  
NYMXer
Senior Member
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
After a lifetime of riding and racing motorcycles, you learn to adapt a loose grip on the bars and that alone saves you a lot of shock. Also loose arms that "go with the flow" of the jarring bumps helps too.

Combined, I don't really see the need for anything else on a road bike. Anyone that feels road shock is too great on their hands and arms might consider taking a few mtb rides and learn how to relax their grip and arms to absorb impacts while the body stays steady and pushes onward.
NYMXer is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 01:11 PM
  #6  
American Euchre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 242 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
I remember seeing Shockstop on one of the crowdfunding sites 3-4 years ago, interesting to see it's still not in production. I think that alone should tell you something about it. I personally don't like suspension bits that alter geometry-- and Shockstop would change stack and reach every time you hit a bump. Just get a frame/fork that can accommodate wider tires. Same effect, no changes in geometry.
The Domane SLR works in the same way, only deflection occurs inside the steerer tube.

If redshift ever makes it into production, which is a big if, it would prove to be a far more economical solution than the slr, which starts at $7K or so.

I'm not sure I'd call either system "suspension." It would be more accurate to call them "deflection systems" rather than suspension systems.
American Euchre is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 01:29 PM
  #7  
American Euchre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 242 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
After a lifetime of riding and racing motorcycles,
Last I checked, motorcycles have suspension.

Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
you learn to adapt a loose grip on the bars and that alone saves you a lot of shock. Also loose arms that "go with the flow" of the jarring bumps helps too.
That's what Grant Petersen used to say when he was in charge of Bridgestone Bicycles USA. Oh, you say they're out of business now?

Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
Combined, I don't really see the need for anything else on a road bike. Anyone that feels road shock is too great on their hands and arms might consider taking a few mtb rides and learn how to relax their grip and arms to absorb impacts while the body stays steady and pushes onward.
Last I checked, most mtb's are full suspension or at least have front suspension combined with 3"+ tires.
American Euchre is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 01:45 PM
  #8  
crankythunder
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: burrokratic republik of Michigan, cubicle LVW-2a20c
Posts: 92

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount, Trek Y-33, Rans LWB recumbent, Vision SWB Recumbent, Fuji MTB, Schwinn Beach Cruiser with two stroke

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a old quill stem shock stem

I have it on one of my commuter bicycles.

I like it a lot. Makes it a little bit more comfortable.

Regards,
Cranky
crankythunder is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 01:50 PM
  #9  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4366 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 32 Times in 31 Posts
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
After a lifetime of riding and racing motorcycles, you learn to adapt a loose grip on the bars and that alone saves you a lot of shock. Also loose arms that "go with the flow" of the jarring bumps helps too.

.
+1,

I still use my old fashioned shock absorbing wrists, combined with a classic curved blade fork, to absorb Normal road shocks. Bigger stuff calls for bike handling skills.

I'm always intrigued by solutions to problems that didn't exist until folks outsmarted conventional wisdom. My rule has always been that if you don't introduce a problem, you won't need to come up with a fix.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 02:49 PM
  #10  
NYMXer
Senior Member
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by American Euchre View Post
Last I checked, motorcycles have suspension.



That's what Grant Petersen used to say when he was in charge of Bridgestone Bicycles USA. Oh, you say they're out of business now?



Last I checked, most mtb's are full suspension or at least have front suspension combined with 3"+ tires.
I was offering my thoughts and not everyone will agree with them all the time. I get the feeling that you don't agree with anyone anytime.
NYMXer is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 02:51 PM
  #11  
American Euchre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 242 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
+1,

I still use my old fashioned shock absorbing wrists, combined with a classic curved blade fork, to absorb Normal road shocks. Bigger stuff calls for bike handling skills.

I'm always intrigued by solutions to problems that didn't exist until folks outsmarted conventional wisdom. My rule has always been that if you don't introduce a problem, you won't need to come up with a fix.
With this thinking we'd still be stuck with horse and buggy on dirt roads.

Oh wait, we wouldn't have roads either.

Or buggy.
American Euchre is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 02:53 PM
  #12  
American Euchre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 242 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
I was offering my thoughts and not everyone will agree with them all the time. I get the feeling that you don't agree with anyone anytime.
Let's stick to facts instead of juvenile name calling.

Facts such as:
1. motorcycles have suspension
2. mtb's have suspension
3. mtb's have 3" wide tires and still have suspension
4. grant petersen advocated what you did and now his former company is out of business and his current one is just scraping by.
American Euchre is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 03:09 PM
  #13  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4366 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 32 Times in 31 Posts
Originally Posted by American Euchre View Post
With this thinking we'd still be stuck with horse and buggy on dirt roads.

.
Those old enough to have plenty of miles on top end curved blade forks will remember how well these managed road shock and vibration. As roads got better, they changed the curve and taper, and ultimately went to straight blades.

These were fine for pros riding pretty decent roads, but for most sport and recreational riders were an example of fashion trumping function. Likewise the move to ultra narrow tires, which is now finally going the other way. (of course, that's after filling the marketplace with frames that won't clear anything wider than 25mm).

In any case, I'm not arguing against a shock stem for those who need it, just saying that they might not have needed it if the need wasn't created by poor decisions by designers and buyers.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 03:38 PM
  #14  
American Euchre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 242 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by crankythunder View Post
I have it on one of my commuter bicycles.

I like it a lot. Makes it a little bit more comfortable.

Regards,
Cranky
How did you get it? Preprod. sample?

The company is taking pre-orders ostensibly for a ship date this month.

I'm always skeptical of these crowdfunded bike items. The Oi! is turning out to be disappointing for many buyers.

I might pre-order myself. It would be a cost efficient alternative to a 2017 roubaix, which btw is a fraction of the cost of the domane slr.
American Euchre is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 03:39 PM
  #15  
American Euchre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 242 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
Those old enough to have plenty of miles on top end curved blade forks will remember how well these managed road shock and vibration. As roads got better, they changed the curve and taper, and ultimately went to straight blades.

These were fine for pros riding pretty decent roads, but for most sport and recreational riders were an example of fashion trumping function. Likewise the move to ultra narrow tires, which is now finally going the other way. (of course, that's after filling the marketplace with frames that won't clear anything wider than 25mm).

In any case, I'm not arguing against a shock stem for those who need it, just saying that they might not have needed it if the need wasn't created by poor decisions by designers and buyers.
Dude, the consumer has voted. They want suspension. And fat tires. They want comfort. Who doesn't? Bicycling is supposed to be fun, not an exercise in ideological dogma or tradition for it's own sake.
American Euchre is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 03:48 PM
  #16  
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Posts: 35,964

Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter

Mentioned: 125 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4366 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 32 Times in 31 Posts
Originally Posted by American Euchre View Post
Dude, the consumer has voted. They want suspension. And fat tires. They want comfort. Who doesn't? Bicycling is supposed to be fun, not an exercise in ideological dogma or tradition for it's own sake.
I voted LONG AGO.

ALL my road bikes have clearance for tires up to about 30-32mm or so, and nice road compliant curved blade forks.

You misread my posts, I'm not arguing against comfort or practicality, just that these were available for a long time, but people voted to look like racing pros. Now they have to solve a problem they wouldn't have had, had they not followed fashion.

It's like building a car that rides like a beat up truck, then installing a springier seat and suspension steering column.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 03:51 PM
  #17  
WhyFi
Senior Member
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: TC, MN
Posts: 34,739

Bikes: R3 Disc, Haanjo

Mentioned: 344 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16826 Post(s)
Liked 5,533 Times in 2,869 Posts
Originally Posted by American Euchre View Post
Let's stick to facts instead of juvenile name calling.

Facts such as:
1. motorcycles have suspension
2. mtb's have suspension
3. mtb's have 3" wide tires and still have suspension
4. grant petersen advocated what you did and now his former company is out of business and his current one is just scraping by.
You think that the suspension on motorcycles and MTBs is there primarily to provide comfort?
WhyFi is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 03:59 PM
  #18  
Silvercivic27
Senior Member
 
Silvercivic27's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 2,435

Bikes: Colnago, Cervelo, Scott

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 190 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I have to say, I checked out the new Roubaix about a month ago, and that front suspension stem felt really really cheap and clunky, like the spring suspension on the fork on an entry level MTB. I was really underwhelmed by it.
Silvercivic27 is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 05:02 PM
  #19  
NYMXer
Senior Member
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Posts: 1,495

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Raleigh Tamland 1 and Giant Anthem X

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 352 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by American Euchre View Post
Let's stick to facts instead of juvenile name calling.

Facts such as:
1. motorcycles have suspension
2. mtb's have suspension
3. mtb's have 3" wide tires and still have suspension
4. grant petersen advocated what you did and now his former company is out of business and his current one is just scraping by.
We are not talking about motorcycles, you are. Motorcycles need suspension for the additional weight and speed they are capable of for rider safety and ability to control the motorcycle. Bicycles weigh much less and are not capable of those speeds. Certainly a poor comparison between the two.

Many mtb's have suspension but we are talking about road bicycles, Only you are talking about mtb's, get aboard with the rest of us. This is a road bike forum and thread, check the title and sub forum.

Mtb's have a great variety of tire widths, more than just the plus size 3" you mention, but again....this is about road bikes.

You brought up Grant Petersen and only you want to make it a part of this thread.

So, all your "facts" are those that you introduced and only you are talking about. Anyway, I think our discussion is over as it appears you just look to bait for an argument and I have no time or patience for that kind of narrow minded game. All the best, I'm done with you but you can quote this and get the last word if that makes you feel better about yourself.
NYMXer is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 05:09 PM
  #20  
smarkinson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 1,003
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 332 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 7 Posts
From the latest update on their Kickstarter page it appears they should be shipping to their backers soon:

"Here's the latest schedule:
  • The shipment from the factory is scheduled to leave from Taipei airport on Nov. 4th.
  • We expect to receive units here in Philadelphia on Nov. 11th.
  • Fulfillment will begin immediately and we expect all orders to ship out within approximately one week."
smarkinson is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 05:32 PM
  #21  
side_FX
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 551
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by American Euchre View Post
The Domane SLR works in the same way, only deflection occurs inside the steerer tube.

If redshift ever makes it into production, which is a big if, it would prove to be a far more economical solution than the slr, which starts at $7K or so.

I'm not sure I'd call either system "suspension." It would be more accurate to call them "deflection systems" rather than suspension systems.
Just a FYI - you can get an SLR for $5K. Still a ton of dough.....but less than $7K
side_FX is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 05:55 PM
  #22  
American Euchre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 242 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by side_FX View Post
Just a FYI - you can get an SLR for $5K. Still a ton of dough.....but less than $7K
Still, $5K is twice that of the entry level sus roubaix '17 which is $2.6K.
American Euchre is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 05:58 PM
  #23  
American Euchre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 242 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Silvercivic27 View Post
I have to say, I checked out the new Roubaix about a month ago, and that front suspension stem felt really really cheap and clunky, like the spring suspension on the fork on an entry level MTB. I was really underwhelmed by it.
That is disappointing to hear. Better news for me if a $140 works just as well if not better. $300 for a specialized CGR seat post and this stem might work out reasonably well as a "full sus" road setup.
American Euchre is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 06:11 PM
  #24  
American Euchre
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 569
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 242 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by NYMXer View Post
We are not talking about motorcycles, you are. Motorcycles need suspension for the additional weight and speed they are capable of for rider safety and ability to control the motorcycle. Bicycles weigh much less and are not capable of those speeds. Certainly a poor comparison between the two.

Many mtb's have suspension but we are talking about road bicycles, Only you are talking about mtb's, get aboard with the rest of us. This is a road bike forum and thread, check the title and sub forum.

Mtb's have a great variety of tire widths, more than just the plus size 3" you mention, but again....this is about road bikes.

You brought up Grant Petersen and only you want to make it a part of this thread.

So, all your "facts" are those that you introduced and only you are talking about. Anyway, I think our discussion is over as it appears you just look to bait for an argument and I have no time or patience for that kind of narrow minded game. All the best, I'm done with you but you can quote this and get the last word if that makes you feel better about yourself.
You must not know how to read your own posts as you were the one to bring up motorcycles. Or do you not remember?

I've hit 50 mph on descents on my road bike. I average 15-17 mph on my rides with significant portions on very busy paths. 20+ mph on flats/slight downhills, 30+ mph on descents. The roads where I live are in good shape overall, but the paths are increasingly in really bad shape. Tree roots are pushing up the concrete.

Suspended road bikes are actually a good idea for many riders; even in an affluent nearby city, the roads are in awful shape; the area is in the middle of the forests and it's really not possible to repave the roads without similar damage re-occurring.

Anyway, lol at your "motorcycle" comments. If you don't want to talk about motorcycles or want them compared to bicycles, don't mention motorcycles or compare them to bicycles.
American Euchre is offline  
Old 11-06-16, 06:42 PM
  #25  
Jiggle
Senior Member
 
Jiggle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Somewhere in TX
Posts: 2,266

Bikes: BH, Cervelo, Cube, Canyon

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 212 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
I'd be willing to give it a try but I doubt I need it. 3T Aeronovas and my excellent core strength mean my hands feel fine.
Jiggle is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.