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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Your Most Recent Cycling-related Repair

Old 08-29-22, 02:19 AM
  #176  
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Originally Posted by 1sp33d
That makes sense. Any idea how the derailleur would get into the wheel in the first place?
Might be a poorly adjusted limit screw. Might be a loose mounting bolt on the derailleur, might have been knocked at some stage.
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Old 08-29-22, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by 1sp33d
That makes sense. Any idea how the derailleur would get into the wheel in the first place?
Originally Posted by znomit
Might be a poorly adjusted limit screw. Might be a loose mounting bolt on the derailleur, might have been knocked at some stage.
Another way to lose a rear derailleur is from "chain suck" on the front chainring. I pulled off two derailleurs that way.
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Old 08-29-22, 08:31 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
Another way to lose a rear derailleur is from "chain suck" on the front chainring. I pulled off two derailleurs that way.
Thanks! What is chain suck? From cross chaining? I've been trying to make sure I don't cross chain. This bike has a triple crank from the original tiagra.
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Old 08-29-22, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by 1sp33d
Thanks! What is chain suck? From cross chaining? I've been trying to make sure I don't cross chain. This bike has a triple crank from the original tiagra.
Here’s a good article on chain suck at mtbr.com.
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Old 09-17-22, 01:37 AM
  #180  
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Thank you terrymorse . I broke my rear derailleur too a while back on an old bike (fortunately the replaceable hanger broke not the derailleur itself) when it got caught up in the spokes, and I think it may have been due to chainsuck since I was shifting the front down under load with a dirty chain (not sure if that matters).

I also re-indexed my rear derailleur on my Trek. I was scared that it might be that I had bent the hanger again. It has not been long since I had indexed my rear derailleur so it made me interested in ditching indexing for these interesting handlebar friction shifters (Dia-Compe or the new Genevalle as in the video below).

BUT, I found that the serious issues I was having was due to my having routed the chain the wrong way around one rear derailleur cage tabs when replacing the chain after waxing. I am relieved to see that I am not the first to have done this, no but, I am ashamed, and since it now works fine, I will stick with indexed shifters.

I also re-glued upper to sole again and added some tape to the fraying heel liner. The ratchets and ratchet straps and one cleat bolt nut in the sole has been replaced. Soon I'll have to replace the fuzzy side of the toe strap Velcro. They look decrepit but functionally they are little different from a new pair, maybe.

Old Shimano Cycling Shoes by Timothy Takemoto, on Flickr

And I put the 100 yen shop (dollar store) EVA insoles in these too.

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Old 09-24-22, 07:23 PM
  #181  
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As suggested by Mojo31, thank you, I used a self adhesive steel pad on my opposite chain stay.

Chainstay Protector by Timothy Takemoto, on Flickr
It weighs a similar amount to the thin piece of piping that I used, but it requires little preparation (other than bending it into a C shape), the steel is stainless, it comes with glue on the back and it is cheap from China (about 60cents a pad). I recommend sticking them to your chain stays if you see any wear there. I don't use my Look much these days because I prefer the firmness of my Trek. Part of the squigginess of my Look may be due to chainstay wear. I think it is mostly however that the Trek is simply a firmer frame.

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Old 10-10-22, 11:34 PM
  #182  
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Since it is getting chilly I made some more shoe covers from plastic soda bottle covers, white with a pattern -- "Bird Watching" -- on them this year at 220 yen (1.5 USD) the pair. The strap is a bit tight for my 27.5cm (US 9.5 Europe 43) feet but it can be extended a little at the buckle to make it just the right length, so I am using the straps and I bought another pair for my Sidis.

Bottle Shoe cover by Timothy Takemoto, on Flickr

Sidis Too by Timothy Takemoto, on Flickr

I also attempted to mend my older bike the derailleur of which had been sheered off at the hanger when the chain got stuck and the derailleur ended between the spokes. It turned out it was probably due to my using an aftermarket Chinese rear-derailleur jockey wheel which is 0.5mm too thick, purchased because I hate paying 15USD for a pair of Shimano ones! But even with a brand new derailleur hanger, the derailleur is clearly way off kilter and the thin (half thickness compared to Trek non-removable / factory removable type) piece of aluminum (?) that the removal derailleur hanger is fixed to is bent. Now I know why some prefer the old-school Trek Madone / 5200 way of doing things.

A bevel washer would not work because I would have to cross thread the derailleur bolt. I am going to investigate wedge washers if such things exist before attempting to bend the hanger attachment point or the hanger itself (which is really weak).(Not wedge but) Bevel washers are a thing and cheap from China. This may mean that I don't need to bend the attachment point so much.https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005001774675845.html

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Old 01-11-23, 02:36 AM
  #183  
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I put my fairings back onto my 105 11s equipped Look 385.

Winter fairings

These days I prefer my 2007Trek Madone 5.2 but the 10s Ultegra brifters do not have space for me to drill a hole into them to mount the fairings, which I was loath to do anyway. I guess more people would mount fairings like mine if they did not have to drill holes in their brifters. So in search of a less damaging alternative I went to a hardware store and found these U or ∩ shaped pipe holders which are only a little too small to fit onto the tops of the brifters. The mounting bold is the same M6 size. I will use an angle grinder to make them bigger and report back.

∩ shaped pipe holder for mounting a fairing on brifters

I swapped out my rear wheel because the hub of the Pasak rear wheel broke. I had trouble with the freewheel hub previously due to a lack of grease. Pasak were not prepared to send me a new pawl spring to replace the one that broke but I repared the freewheel hub using a spring from another wheel. I was hoping that it would last a while but the rear wheel hub broke irreparably when I went over a railway track, perpendicular to the track. It was not much of a jolt but the hub nodule broke off, before the spoke broke.


Alas the hub was weaker than the spoke

Maybe I can get another hub one day. The rims and spokes are still in good condition.

I was not surprised to find that Pasak would not replace the wheel. They no longer sell this style of rear wheel and the new version looks stronger but, I managed to get an unworn but old Shimano WH-RS20 rear wheel for less than the price of a Pasak.
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Old 01-11-23, 07:06 AM
  #184  
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Not too recent, but replaced the front triple der. on my wife's as well as my '06 Lemond Reno. Had a new, same model as original that I put on mine (that model was prone to the tab breaking that holds the spring), and put a Microshift on my wife's LeMond. The Microshift seems sturdier than the discontinued Shimano model. Expect mine to break long before hers.
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Old 01-11-23, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
Another way to lose a rear derailleur is from "chain suck" on the front chainring. I pulled off two derailleurs that way.
I had that on my mountain bike. was super annoying. tried all kinds of things. then one season I removed the chain & cleaned the chain & drive train really well & the problem went away. I've since replaced the chain & drive train & still enjoy freedom from chain suck
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Old 01-11-23, 08:57 AM
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Originally Posted by timtak
I put my fairings back onto my 105 11s equipped Look 385.

Winter fairings
very cool! was out on my road bike last night w/ drop bar bar mitts but they don't protect my hands in the drops. it's OK & I get by, but it's such a waste of material to only protect limited hand positions
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Old 01-11-23, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by timtak
Thank you terrymorse . I broke my rear derailleur too a while back on an old bike (fortunately the replaceable hanger broke not the derailleur itself) when it got caught up in the spokes, and I think it may have been due to chainsuck since I was shifting the front down under load with a dirty chain (not sure if that matters).
yes! it did for me! see other post in this thread. glad you mentioned it
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Old 01-11-23, 09:02 AM
  #188  
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Originally Posted by 1sp33d
What is chain suck?
excerpt:
"Chainsuck occurs primarily when downshifting under load from the middle to the smallest chainring," wrote the late bike repair guru Sheldon Brown. "The bottom run of the chain may not immediately disengage from the middle ring, and can get carried upward until it wedges betwixt the chainwheels and the right chainstay. This jams the crankset."

but I was getting it even when not shifting. always seemed to happen at the worst possible time. in granny gear, out of the saddle, steep hill climb, under great load
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Old 01-11-23, 08:51 PM
  #189  
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6
very cool! was out on my road bike last night w/ drop bar bar mitts but they don't protect my hands in the drops. it's OK & I get by, but it's such a waste of material to only protect limited hand positions
Hi
Thank you for the chain suck information.

I have considered Pogies but I want to be able to use the drop and hooks and everything. I hope that Pogie Lites
are made available again but they are not cheap
https://bikeiowa.store/products/pogi...=8136388804709

Aliexpress pogies are made of thicker or multiply material like yours and I am only seeing the flat bar versions.

Last edited by timtak; 01-11-23 at 08:54 PM. Reason: add aliexpress link again because it did not work at first
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Old 01-12-23, 04:57 AM
  #190  
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Originally Posted by timtak
I have considered Pogies but I want to be able to use the drop and hooks and everything. I hope that Pogie Lites
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMLPlmkKq5M&t=206s
are made available again but they are not cheap
https://bikeiowa.store/products/pogi...=8136388804709

Aliexpress pogies are made of thicker or multiply material like yours and I am only seeing the flat bar versions.
thank you
those Pogie Lites have compelling features & benefits
that Aliexpress link didn't work for me
I have seen Moose Mitts (for drop bars) which look more like a furry fairing
https://jnyyz.wordpress.com/2011/01/...arm-thumbs-up/

Online Ordering
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Old 01-12-23, 06:43 PM
  #191  
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Thanks again

Originally Posted by rumrunn6
thank you
those Pogie Lites have compelling features & benefits
that Aliexpress link didn't work for me
I have seen Moose Mitts (for drop bars) which look more like a furry fairing
https://jnyyz.wordpress.com/2011/01/...arm-thumbs-up/

Online Ordering
The moose mitts look good, especially in the Hi Viz versions (I am very into high viz)
but they are quite expensive too (104.99 per pair) for the flat bar version and the drop bar version is currently (but not for long) sold out.
There are pogies for about 15USD on aliexpress -- but none high viz.

Perhaps this link will work
https://tinyurl.com/pogiesonaliexpress

Even with my fairings my hands get cold in the coldest weather so I may add mitt type flanges to the fairings in the future.
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Old 01-12-23, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by timtak
Thanks again


The moose mitts look good, especially in the Hi Viz versions (I am very into high viz)
but they are quite expensive too (104.99 per pair) for the flat bar version and the drop bar version is currently (but not for long) sold out.
There are pogies for about 15USD on aliexpress -- but none high viz.

Perhaps this link will work
https://tinyurl.com/pogiesonaliexpress

Even with my fairings my hands get cold in the coldest weather so I may add mitt type flanges to the fairings in the future.
no-go on the link it only brings me to the Ali express website not a specific product. My bar mitts provide shelter from the wind & elements like wet snow& rain& also provide some thermal protection but they don’t generate heat you have to provide that on your own
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Old 01-12-23, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6
no-go on the link it only brings me to the Ali express website not a specific product.
Sorry. You are right,for me too. It was a search result for "pogie handlebar" (without quotes) but search results seem to be time limited. There are three or four types for about 15-10 USD.

Originally Posted by rumrunn6
My bar mitts provide shelter from the wind & elements like wet snow& rain& also provide some thermal protection but they don’t generate heat you have to provide that on your own
Yes.

I have considered heated gloves and the like but it is another thing to charge so I am providing my heat on my own too.
.
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Old 01-13-23, 04:41 AM
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Originally Posted by timtak
I have considered heated gloves and the like but it is another thing to charge so I am providing my heat on my own too.
.
yes, my hands heat up just fine as I ride. they may start cold & I have to breath on them & into my gloves but then as I ride they warm up

wish my toes were the same but they aren't do I use chemical heat packs in my shoes
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Old 01-13-23, 06:53 AM
  #195  
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I flushed out a non free-hubing early 90s freehub and lubed it without disassembling it. It works as it should now. I call that a win.
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Old 01-13-23, 07:19 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6
wish my toes were the same but they aren't do I use chemical heat packs in my shoes
Chemical heat packs are good. They are all the rage here in Japan. I keep them in little containers so I can reuse the same ones a few times.

Hand Warmer Life Extenders by Timothy Takemoto, on Flickr

The soda bottle covers further up are really helping too
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Old 01-14-23, 05:10 AM
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Originally Posted by timtak
Chemical heat packs are good. They are all the rage here in Japan. I keep them in little containers so I can reuse the same ones a few times.Hand Warmer Life Extenders by Timothy Takemoto, on Flickr The soda bottle covers further up are really helping too
thank you
yeah I saw the DIY shoe covers. VERY clever. I almost did them same with giant neoprene coffee cup covers but I never did it, very impressed that you did it because the thin commercial shoe covers suck & are never large enough for my size 13 boots
so those jars work even w/ the air space? I used to use plastic bags for the same purpose
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Old 01-14-23, 05:55 AM
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Originally Posted by timtak
I put my fairings back onto my 105 11s equipped Look 385.

Winter fairings
.
Can't help thinking ROCK 'EM SOCK 'EM
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Old 01-14-23, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6
thank you
yeah I saw the DIY shoe covers. VERY clever. I almost did them same with giant neoprene coffee cup covers but I never did it, very impressed that you did it because the thin commercial shoe covers suck & are never large enough for my size 13 boots
Alas they would not work with size 13 boots. But this cover for 1 litre bottles would work though they are more pricey
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32644265469.html

Originally Posted by rumrunn6
so those jars work even w/ the air space? I used to use plastic bags for the same purpose
I think that the air only meant that they stayed hot for a while, and the warmers last a few hours. I think I only used them three times. I have managed to get two small warmers into one jar but it is a squeeze. Bags may be the way to go. Ziplock?

@Sy Reene
I didn't know what that was but you are right.

Rock'em Sock'em
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Old 01-15-23, 06:40 AM
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Originally Posted by timtak
I think that the air only meant that they stayed hot for a while, and the warmers last a few hours. I think I only used them three times. I have managed to get two small warmers into one jar but it is a squeeze. Bags may be the way to go. Ziplock?
yes & squeeze all the air out. I was doing that 1 winter. fresh packs in the morning, then saved them for the ride home, but that was it for them
I use the toe warmers but also actual hand warmers when it's really cold & for longer rides
I don't bike commute in the winter anymore so I'm not going thru as many
the instructions say not to use them on the tops of the foot but it's easier that way to keep them in place plus I think the top of the foot takes the biggest hit from cold & snow

sometimes I layer them between sock liners & a winter sock



sometimes I just use 1 pair of socks

that's an old photo I have better boots for winter riding

masking tape works best, I don't use so much of it anymore

Last edited by rumrunn6; 01-15-23 at 06:53 AM.
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