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Carbon tubulars Mavic 2019 CCU vs Zipp 454 NSW vs Enve 3.4

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Carbon tubulars Mavic 2019 CCU vs Zipp 454 NSW vs Enve 3.4

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Old 08-09-18, 04:20 AM
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Boerd
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Carbon tubulars Mavic 2019 CCU vs Zipp 454 NSW vs Enve 3.4

Looking to buy a pair of carbon tubulars (let's not have the tubular vs clincher debate here). I like the look of the new Mavic Carbon Ultimate 2019 (will be in USA in September from what I heard from my LBS) and I also like the looks of the Zipp 454 NSW tubular. I added Enve 3.4 because of their technology (no drilling of the carbon rim) and their warranty, good service etc but I find the looks of Enve as being too plain
I am looking at wheels around 40 mm (max 53mm like the Zipp 454) that can be used as a set of everyday wheels; durable and stiff - the stiffer the better
Anybody has any experience with these wheels? Any advice? I am planning to use tape https://www.effettomariposa.eu/en/products/carogna/ for installation if that's of any importance.

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Old 08-09-18, 07:17 AM
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I am waiting for my Campy Bora 35 carbon wheels. The Mavic Aksiums that came with my Synapse are much heavier than the Ambrosio Nemesis aluminum tubular wheels I have been riding. I definitely notice the extra rotational weight.
ProBikeKit had the Boras on sale for $ 1200.00
i would have had my local wheelbuilder but the advent of disc brakes has ushered in a new design concern since there is less symmetry to the braking forces which may make traditional wheelbuilding need to adapt.
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Old 08-09-18, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by waters60 View Post
i would have had my local wheelbuilder but the advent of disc brakes has ushered in a new design concern since there is less symmetry to the braking forces which may make traditional wheelbuilding need to adapt.
Any wheel building techniques that needed adapting to disc brakes surely must have been worked on during the past decade and a half (at least) that MTBs have been using disc brakes, or so I'd think. I've built a few disc wheels myself now along with numerous rim brake wheels. Used the same ages-old techniques which yielded the same good results in either type of build. YMMV.
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Old 08-09-18, 09:31 AM
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I bought clinchers, but faced a similar choice, and went with Enve 4.5 ARs. Zipps were available, too, but they've had a lot of problems with wheels they've sold (hubs, rims cracking at spoke holes) and their service isn't reputed to be very great. I've been absolutely in love with my Enve wheels. So my advice would be the 3.4s based on all of that.
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Old 08-09-18, 10:11 AM
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If you want stiff wheels, go for a 24/28 spoke count on whichever rim/brand you choose.

Even the stiffest rim won't make a stiff wheel with 18/24 or 20/24 lacing. Spokes and spoke gauge is what makes a stiff wheel.
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Old 08-10-18, 01:55 AM
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If your everyday riding involves much braking in the rain I would go for aluminium rims.
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Old 08-10-18, 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
If you want stiff wheels, go for a 24/28 spoke count on whichever rim/brand you choose.

Even the stiffest rim won't make a stiff wheel with 18/24 or 20/24 lacing. Spokes and spoke gauge is what makes a stiff wheel.
Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
If your everyday riding involves much braking in the rain I would go for aluminium rims.
I am also getting Hed Belgium Plus 24/28 with White Industries but I hope the Carbon tubulars won’t assplode on me. My rides include climbing and descending so a bit of breaking is in order. Still I think the better carbons are safe. Just unsure how stiff they are.
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