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Local Bike shop opinions

Old 01-16-19, 02:26 PM
  #1  
sultanofsuede
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Local Bike shop opinions

i'm considering working with a trusted local shop to build out a bike. considering a custom steel or TI frame with campagnolo and in my discussions with their lead mechanic (he's been working there for decades), he mentioned that he hadn't really done much with campagnolo parts in about 10 years. should i have any worry about him building out this bike for me (ordering the correct parts, specs on the frame, assembly/labor, etc...)? i do trust the guy (he's been working on road bikes and racing out of the same shop for as long as i can remember), but just curious if i could be setting myself up for a series of issues down the road.

thanks for any tips -
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Old 01-16-19, 02:49 PM
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Here's the best tip I have for you; go to school on what it is you're buying because in the end it's you that's paying for it and you'll have to live with it, good or bad. Measure four times, cut once so to speak. I would certainly listen to what someone at a shop had to say but I would verify from several sources, including yourself.

Get a professional fitting done and change the position on your current bike to as close as you can get to what the fitter said was optimal; then go ride the bike, a lot. If the position bears out to be beneficial, THEN go look for a custom fit bike. Long ago, one of the teams I was on had frames made by Mike Melton, a very respected builder and someone who had built bikes for people way faster than me. After he took all his measurements and gave me the dimensions of my new frame I realized the top tube was going to be way longer than I was currently riding or ever had ridden. I had him set up my bike I was riding at the time to mimic what he thought I should have and I rode it, a lot. I came back for the final fitting and he evaluated my position by watching me ride; I never said a word to try and sway him, he agreed the top tube would be too long and built the new frame based on the revision. Trust but verify and don't be afraid to trust yourself.

Last edited by nomadmax; 01-17-19 at 08:12 AM.
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Old 01-16-19, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by sultanofsuede View Post
i'm considering working with a trusted local shop to build out a bike. considering a custom steel or TI frame with campagnolo and in my discussions with their lead mechanic (he's been working there for decades), he mentioned that he hadn't really done much with campagnolo parts in about 10 years. should i have any worry about him building out this bike for me (ordering the correct parts, specs on the frame, assembly/labor, etc...)? i do trust the guy (he's been working on road bikes and racing out of the same shop for as long as i can remember), but just curious if i could be setting myself up for a series of issues down the road.

thanks for any tips -
When choosing to continue what appears to be a long running relationship with a trusted shop/lead mechanic there is only one variable left to factor in.
Is he left-handed or right-handed?
Trust me; you did the right thing by coming to the internet to ask our opinion.
Means everything in the world when working with campy equipment.
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Old 01-17-19, 04:21 AM
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What?
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Old 01-17-19, 05:43 AM
  #5  
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I just had the mechanic I mainly use build out my bike for me. I supplied the components, he put them together. He did have to order a few things for me. Seat post, BB and cables.. So, little different.. but, he did a great job. I have no complaints. And the shop warranties the work just like if it was one of the bikes they sold.. so, I get the free adjustments, etc when the new parts 'settle in', etc. If you trust them, there should be no reason to worry.
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Old 01-17-19, 09:37 AM
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I think the real question of concern here from the OP is the mechanics ten year hiatus from Campagnolo. The mechanic may have a bit of a learning curve to catch up with the new and improved components of today. Maybe watching a lot of Youtube vids? The OP could and possibly should, research the Campy parts he wants to use and have a list for the mech to look over and see if he is willing to build using them. And if there is another wrench in the shop, perhaps all 3 could talk over the build and go from there. If the mechanic is a good wrench and builds a good bike, this all should be able to be resolved with a little research.
Cheers
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Old 01-17-19, 10:44 AM
  #7  
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You're fortunate to have a local bike shop you trust with a good, long term wrench. Kudos for supporting the shop and mechanic.
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Old 01-17-19, 10:47 AM
  #8  
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I would think its pretty rare to have a shop that deals a lot with Campy at this point. Campy is just so rarely spec'd on bikes that it shouldnt be a surprise that a lead mechanic hasnt dealt with it in a decade. It seems that those who use Campy on here are often their own mechanic too and bought the group on their own.

If the shop is willing to do the build, then pay em and expect proper results. Its the whole point of the business- they are going to spend the time to build it for a fee.
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Old 01-17-19, 02:09 PM
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Working with Campy vs Shimano/Sram isn't like working on a car vs working in your garden. It's all bike parts. A good bike mechanic should be able to work with any parts. I'm a moderately competent home mechanic and I built one bike with Campy a couple of years ago and there was nothing foreign about it even though I'd never worked with or ridden a bike with Campy in my life before that. There might be little differences but reading the manuals makes everything clear. There are little differences between Sram and Shimano. There are little differences between different generations of Shimano groupsets. Setting up 6700 front derailleur is the same in theory as 6800 but there are differences in doing it optimally that you won't know unless you read the manual for the parts you are installing.

I agree that you should do all the research on specing your bike out and making sure all of the parts are going to be compatible with your frame and with each other but once you have that sorted then your mechanic should have no problem building it
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Old 01-17-19, 03:18 PM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by sultanofsuede View Post
i'm considering working with a trusted local shop to build out a bike. considering a custom steel or TI frame with campagnolo and in my discussions with their lead mechanic (he's been working there for decades), he mentioned that he hadn't really done much with campagnolo parts in about 10 years. should i have any worry about him building out this bike for me (ordering the correct parts, specs on the frame, assembly/labor, etc...)? i do trust the guy (he's been working on road bikes and racing out of the same shop for as long as i can remember), but just curious if i could be setting myself up for a series of issues down the road.

thanks for any tips -
As a local mechanic and shop - you should have zero concerns. You don't get to stick around that long if you suck. Campy isn't that hard. In fact it is amazingly straight forward and almost all mechanics can work with it easily and effectively. Not to mention there is a ton of documentation and support out there as well.

Not much Campy in the last 10 years is because it has essentially died on enthusiasts bikes in that timeframe. We still see it but usually only on rigs belonging to old rich guys.

Also - I couldn't tell you the last time I had to overhaul some shifters form them. Had an early 9 speed Record ergopower triple setup come in last year. I was able to track down the parts and perform the service fairly easily and restore them to like new condition and performance.

Campy is Campy. Good mechanics are good mechanics.

Now as to your choice of Campy in this day and age with the available choices of other product....
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Old 01-17-19, 04:11 PM
  #11  
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Out here , only visitors have Campagnolo bikes, and on tours, If they need parts, it's all special order .. none stocked..

So a couple options 1), hang out wait , hotel rooms and restaurants abundant, 2) a call placed to next town with a good bike shop ,
they place the special order, and 2~3 days down the road it may be shipped out, so there before they get there .

3) go on bus to Portland get things there then come back..

I own some Campag parts but it's mostly C&V & closeouts (80's era MTB stuff for my Touring bike)






....
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Old 01-18-19, 12:13 PM
  #12  
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as always - good feedback/input from the RCBF.
i do trust this guy, and i'm not in some huge hurry, so all parts/pieces can be ordered and assembled with the right amount of research by both of us.

the 'left handed' answer made me laugh, but that's kind of what i was wondering. is working on campy stuff (especially from scratch) something that is kind of learned through years of practice, or not? my guys knows bikes, bike heritage, and bike trends - so from what i'm reading here, i feel pretty good about working with him.
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Old 01-18-19, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by sultanofsuede View Post
is working on campy stuff (especially from scratch) something that is kind of learned through years of practice, or not?
Years of practice?

All modern derailleur drivetrains work in the same basic way. The differences between assembling them are the kinds of things that you can figure out with a few minutes of research now and again.
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Old 01-18-19, 01:31 PM
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I've got Campy on a bike. Some mixed components on other bikes. I do all my own maintenance, and buy mostly through the internet.

I'm trying to figure out what would throw a "mechanic" for a loop.

A 10 year hiatus isn't that long. He would have had experience with brifters & etc. (And, of course, other brands of brifters).

One of the big recent changes is carbon fiber everything.

Ultratorque. It should be straight forward enough, but if one is doing it right, a really long torque wrench allen wrench might be nice (8mm or 10mm???). With that in mind, perhaps getting a couple of tools specific for working with Campy. Bearing tools for Ultratorque?

I'm not convinced that a torque wrench is vital, but for a shop, might as well download the torque specs and follow them.
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Old 01-18-19, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I've got Campy on a bike. Some mixed components on other bikes. I do all my own maintenance, and buy mostly through the internet.

I'm trying to figure out what would throw a "mechanic" for a loop.

A 10 year hiatus isn't that long. He would have had experience with brifters & etc. (And, of course, other brands of brifters).

One of the big recent changes is carbon fiber everything.

Ultratorque. It should be straight forward enough, but if one is doing it right, a really long torque wrench allen wrench might be nice (8mm or 10mm???). With that in mind, perhaps getting a couple of tools specific for working with Campy. Bearing tools for Ultratorque?

I'm not convinced that a torque wrench is vital, but for a shop, might as well download the torque specs and follow them.
Campy EPS comes to mind...............
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Old 01-18-19, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by cycledogg View Post
Campy EPS comes to mind...............
Hmmm...
I suppose I haven't tried the Campy 12 speed or Campy Hydraulic either.

Perhaps it is just wishful thinking that one couldn't get oneself into too much trouble.

I doubt the mechanic will be relying on You-Tube that much. But, if I was the mechanic, I'd give a discount for a customer to buy new stuff to play with, especially during the "off-season"
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