Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Wind noise?

Notices
Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

Wind noise?

Old 04-14-20, 12:27 AM
  #1  
ChrisAlbertson
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Southern California
Posts: 158

Bikes: 70's frame, newer parts

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 91 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 36 Times in 26 Posts
Wind noise?

Is it just me or does this happen to everyone? When the wind speed over my head is up to maybe about 18 MPH the wind noise is loud enough that I don't hear much else.

I have an older bike with friction shifting so I like to listen for chain noise and move the shift levers to minimize the noise. The other day I was trying to listen for a squeak in the crank and then another time it was a once per tire revolution noise I could not hear. The solution is to wait for an uphill section where I slow.

Two days ago I was riding downhill at about 24 MPH (I'm a chicken on residential streets with driveways and intersections.) and some guy had to say "on your left" maybe five times before I noticed. (He was smart enough not to pass until I did notice then disappeared)

Another issue is tire and drivetrain noise from another bike. I can hear a bike following me if we are going downwind but in a headwind I'm deaf.

I wonder if different helmets are different in the amount of wind noise we hear. I know as we get older hearing is not so good and I am over 60 but I hear these things at low speed with no problem.
ChrisAlbertson is offline  
Old 04-14-20, 02:16 AM
  #2  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,379

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3993 Post(s)
Liked 1,791 Times in 1,145 Posts
Yeah, I'm a little concerned about wind noise, mostly to preserve what hearing I have left. It's still pretty good in my right ear but I've lost a lot in the left.

Helmets can create wind turbulence noise and vary a lot between designs. Subjectively, while my POC Omne Air Spin is cooler and better vented than my Bell Formula MIPS, the POC seems to produce less wind turbulence noise. The vent designs are very different.

I occasionally mount video cameras on my helmets and can hear significant differences in wind turbulence. The camera mics can screen out most wind noise from itself, but it picks up whatever turbulence is created by where it's mounted -- stem, seat post, helmet, etc.

I added a set of AirStreamz Cat-Ear Classics, their thickest, to the straps on one helmet. Helps a little but not as much as I'd expected. I wouldn't bother with their smaller, less obtrusive versions.

I got more wind reduction with a $5 set of ear warmers from Walgreen's -- it's just a thick layer of breathable wicking fabric similar to the stuff my Bontrager RXL Thermal gloves are made of, in a springy headset that's comfortable and lightweight. But I don't wear 'em year-round. Probably the same material used by AirStreamz Polartec ear warmer doodads that fasten to the helmet straps.

I've also noticed slight differences in wind turbulence noise depending on the doodads attached to the helmet. I removed the video camera plastic mount from my POC Omne Air Spin before my ride Sunday and it seemed quieter, despite a very windy day (20 mph steady with gusts to 35). I was still wearing front and rear helmet mounted blinkies, although I didn't use them since I was riding in daylight. Next daylight ride I'll omit all the helmet doodads and try again.

I also have an aero helmet with minimal vents and a snap-on cover that blocks even those tiny vents. And it includes a magnet-attached tinted visor, to replace sunglasses. Subjectively, it seems quieter. I don't wear it often. Might try again soon while the weather is cool. It's a rounded shape, not one of the time trial/tri-bike aero helmets with elongated tails, so it doesn't look out of place on a regular road bike ride. Giro and others make this style for folks who don't want a full-on competition style aero helmet. I mostly got it for tackling Strava PRs and it does seem to help a bit, along with aero fit jerseys, etc. But the harness and strap aren't quite as comfortable as my POC and Bell so I don't wear it often.

There are also all kinds of noise-cancelling headphones, ear buds, etc., all claiming to reduce ambient noise while allowing other sounds to pass. They were originally designed for reducing impulse/impact noises for shooting ranges and similarly noisy environments where wearers still needed to be able to hear range commands, etc. Not sure if they're suitable for bicycling.

Theoretically, we could wear earphones or ear buds that exclude most sound the ear would normally pick up, and replace them with a microphone strategically placed where it would be out of the wind. For example, behind the wearer -- clipped to a jersey pocket, seat post, etc. That might work for folks with tinnitus or hearing impairments who want to hear approaching vehicles. I do know from running a rear-facing camera (Drift Ghost-X) that it picks up very little wind noise from the seat post mount. So it's plausible that a wireless mic there transmitting to ear buds could be useful.
canklecat is offline  
Old 04-14-20, 04:17 AM
  #3  
texaspandj
Senior Member
 
texaspandj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Heart Of Texas
Posts: 4,101

Bikes: '85, '86 , '87 , '88 , '89 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman.

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1529 Post(s)
Liked 443 Times in 302 Posts
I suspect helmet shape plays a part and also angle of helmet.
I listen to music when I ride. Generally, I set my Pandora to an artist and when a song comes on I don't care for, I take my earbuds out and listen to my bike. Sometimes I have to look down more to hear my bike. Other times tilt my head to the side or turn my head s little. Or even tip my helmet up with my hand. Just depends on direction of wind and direction I'm headed.
Fortunately and usually it's not overwhelming wind noise. Once again my relatively inexpensive giro helmet helps...I think.
Of course, because I listen to music while riding I worry less about wind noise, however with some earbuds you still hear wind noise.

Last edited by texaspandj; 04-14-20 at 04:21 AM.
texaspandj is offline  
Old 04-14-20, 11:48 AM
  #4  
RedBullFiXX
Senior Member
 
RedBullFiXX's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: SoCal USA
Posts: 188
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 33 Posts
The "right" large glasses and helmet for you, can make a substantial difference in wind noise
Not just and aero helmet, or what a friend may recommend, but a setup that works well for your head/face
RedBullFiXX is offline  
Old 04-16-20, 05:32 PM
  #5  
dmanthree
Senior Member
 
dmanthree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Northeastern MA, USA
Posts: 1,286

Bikes: 2017 Roubaix

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 482 Post(s)
Liked 126 Times in 90 Posts
There's nothing you can do about it. Do not, under any circumstances, wear anything to dull your hearing while n the bike. Especially headphones.
dmanthree is online now  
Likes For dmanthree:
Old 04-16-20, 06:51 PM
  #6  
Ogsarg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Hollister, CA (not the surf town)
Posts: 1,332

Bikes: 2019 Specialized Roubaix Comp Di2, 2009 Roubaix, early 90's Giant Iguana

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 502 Post(s)
Liked 738 Times in 318 Posts
I have moderately bad tinitus, and wind noise aggravates it quite a bit. I've tried the small cat ear things that go on the straps and they provide minimal protection. The winter cat ear things that go in between the straps and cover your whole ear work better but if it's not cold out, they get hot.

there are also attenuators, basically ear plugs designed to just reduce the db level as opposed to blocking out everything. I've tried a couple of different ones. One was really bad and the other worked pretty well. The only issue with those is if you start getting sweaty, they can fall out pretty easily. At this point, i just accept that its there and try not to think about it.

Regardless of whether you do anything to reduce wind noise, I would highly advise some kind of mirror that you can look at periodically so you'll see people/cars coming up behind you. I find this so valuable I have a hard time riding without one.
Ogsarg is offline  
Old 04-16-20, 07:43 PM
  #7  
sced
South Carolina Ed
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Greer, SC
Posts: 3,664

Bikes: Holdsworth Super Mistral Fastback, Macario Pro, Ciocc San Cristobal, Viner Nemo, Cyfac Le Mythique, Giant TCR, Tommasso Mondial, Cyfac Etoile

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 268 Post(s)
Liked 96 Times in 50 Posts
My wife and I got helmets with the magnetic snap-on visors and find them much quieter.
sced is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 03:39 AM
  #8  
MattTheHat 
Senior Member
 
MattTheHat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 1,811

Bikes: 2020 S-Works Creo SL, 2020 Specialized Roubaix Expert

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 583 Post(s)
Liked 2,165 Times in 757 Posts
Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
There's nothing you can do about it. Do not, under any circumstances, wear anything to dull your hearing while n the bike. Especially headphones.
I always ride with headphones. It helps cut down wind noise very well. As an added bonus I can listen to music. As another bonus I can take phone calls without stopping my ride. As an additional bonus it stops the wind noise from damaging my hearing.
MattTheHat is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 05:45 AM
  #9  
OldTryGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SW Fl.
Posts: 5,070

Bikes: Day6 Semi Recumbent "FIREBALL", 1981 Custom Touring Paramount, 1983 Road Paramount, 2013 Giant Propel Advanced SL3, 2018 Specialized Red Roubaix Expert mech., 2002 Magna 7sp hybrid, 1976 Bassett Racing 45sp Cruiser

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 873 Post(s)
Liked 379 Times in 252 Posts
Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
There's nothing you can do about it. Do not, under any circumstances, wear anything to dull your hearing while n the bike. Especially headphones.
Next time while riding extend your "pointer finger" in front of your ear and against the cheek strap and notice the reduction in noise. I've made "cotton pointer fingers" about the same width then spray painted the cotton black and attached them to the straps with Velcro or thin strips of tape. Not too "dorky looking" and works.

Originally Posted by MattTheHat View Post
I always ride with headphones. It helps cut down wind noise very well. As an added bonus I can listen to music. As another bonus I can take phone calls without stopping my ride. As an additional bonus it stops the wind noise from damaging my hearing.
The use of headphones, etc against the law here in FL. --- https://floridacyclinglaw.com/blog/a...headphones-law

"..........Florida, however, is one of only just a few states (Maryland) that make wearing typical headphones and earbuds while riding a bicycle illegal........"
OldTryGuy is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 06:24 AM
  #10  
texaspandj
Senior Member
 
texaspandj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Heart Of Texas
Posts: 4,101

Bikes: '85, '86 , '87 , '88 , '89 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman.

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1529 Post(s)
Liked 443 Times in 302 Posts
Originally Posted by dmanthree View Post
There's nothing you can do about it.
Do not, under any circumstances, wear anything to dull your hearing while n the bike.
Especially headphones.
Yes, you can wear earbuds, it will cut down or completely eliminate wind noise.
The circumstance is you're on country roads,you're riding alone, and you're tired of hearing nothing but wind noise.
Earbuds are the only sustainable way to eliminate wind noise from any direction.
I've ridden with earbuds since I started riding in 1985. The only time I don't wear them is when riding with someone else, And if I'm gonna be riding in town where there is a lot of stop and go traffic. However....
Where,and when I ride (country roads, FM roads) I'm gonna hear mostly wind noise and frankly I'd rather hear music.

Last edited by texaspandj; 04-17-20 at 09:17 AM.
texaspandj is offline  
Likes For texaspandj:
Old 04-17-20, 08:21 AM
  #11  
Tacoenthusiast
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 232
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 127 Post(s)
Liked 218 Times in 83 Posts
Originally Posted by texaspandj View Post
Yes, you can wear earbuds, it will cut down or completely eliminate wind noise.
The circumstance is you're on country roads,you're riding alone, and you're tired of hearing nothing but wind noise.
Headphones are the only sustainable way to eliminate wind noise from any direction.
I've ridden with headphones since I started riding in 1985. The only time I don't wear them is when riding with someone else, And if I'm gonna be riding in town where there is a lot of stop and go traffic. However....
Where,and when I ride (country roads, FM roads) I'm gonna hear mostly wind noise and frankly I'd rather hear music.
Ear plugs are better than headphones, you don't cut down on noise when you just drown it out with a louder noise
​​​​​​

Motorcycle riders often wear earplugs because wind noise at motor vehicle speeds will cause hearing loss over time. I'm not sure if bicycle speeds could have the same effect.
i can tell you from experience that foam earplugs don't make it so you can't hear, they just cut the level down a little

I could see over the ear headphones cutting the wind noise, but I don't see many folks riding around with those :-)
Tacoenthusiast is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 08:32 AM
  #12  
blakcloud 
Senior Member
 
blakcloud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 2,458

Bikes: Trek Domane SL7, Rivendell Sam Hillborne, Brompton S/M3L (modified)

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 546 Post(s)
Liked 254 Times in 168 Posts
Interesting question and interesting responses. I don't have this problem yet, but probably will at some point. My hearing is deteriorating as a I age.

If it is an issue with the helmet, I wonder if an experiment is in order. This won't be popular but try riding without a helmet for one ride. Yes, there is risk but be extra careful and even more diligent than usual. Listen and note if there is less or more air noise. If it is the same, no point in looking at different helmets. Maybe it is something that just isn't fixable.

Though this won't help you with the person behind you trying to overtake you but there was a discussion on another thread about the Garmin Varia which might augment the hearing you do have on approaching vehicles.
blakcloud is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 08:51 AM
  #13  
The Big Wheel
Oooooooofffff SALESMAN!
 
The Big Wheel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Local trails
Posts: 286
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 28 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 3 Posts
What are some of the quietest helmets on the market these days that won't break the bank?

Last edited by The Big Wheel; 04-17-20 at 01:19 PM.
The Big Wheel is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 09:15 AM
  #14  
texaspandj
Senior Member
 
texaspandj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Heart Of Texas
Posts: 4,101

Bikes: '85, '86 , '87 , '88 , '89 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman.

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1529 Post(s)
Liked 443 Times in 302 Posts
Originally Posted by Tacoenthusiast View Post
Ear plugs are better than headphones, you don't cut down on noise when you just drown it out with a louder noise
​​​​​​

Motorcycle riders often wear earplugs because wind noise at motor vehicle speeds will cause hearing loss over time. I'm not sure if bicycle speeds could have the same effect.
i can tell you from experience that foam earplugs don't make it so you can't hear, they just cut the level down a little

I could see over the ear headphones cutting the wind noise, but I don't see many folks riding around with those :-)
You're right, I meant earbuds . Thanks, I'll edit my post.
The tips i can give about using earbuds and listening to music is make sure you get proper fitting ones. The new rubber type ones are a hit and miss type thing. The foam ones were really good but I can't seem to find them anymore. And lastly only listen to GOOD music.
texaspandj is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 10:04 AM
  #15  
Metallifan33
Senior Member
 
Metallifan33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 243

Bikes: Trek Domane SL 5

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 206 Post(s)
Liked 99 Times in 47 Posts
So funny, I was thinking about this yesterday. I normally average only around 16 mph, but during the stretches where I'm at 24 +, I've noticed the wind noise as well. And it's night and day whether I put my head down or look up. It made me wonder about the pros who average in the 28 mph range... I wonder how they deal with the constant noise. They don't wear headphones or anything either (I wonder if it's a lot quieter inside the peloton)... My guess would be yes, but I wouldn't know as I've never ridden with anyone else.
Anyway, I use the Apple AirPod Pro (in my right ear only). They have active noise cancelling but I don't use that feature so I can hear what's around me. Regardless, when you're above 24 mph, headphones or not, you can't hear much.
I wouldn't use the earbuds if I rode in the city though (my normal route has a very few opportunities a car can turn in front of you).
Regarding long term hearing loss, I've spent years in semi-loud environments at work. It's not the loud spikes in noise, it's the constant drone over hours and hours a day that I've seen affect people (in the long term). I'm not sure a few hours a week on the bike would hurt you, but if you already have hearing loss, I can see a valid concern.
Metallifan33 is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 12:02 PM
  #16  
Racing Dan
Senior Member
 
Racing Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,732
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1005 Post(s)
Liked 123 Times in 91 Posts
Covering the ears with a thin skullcap helps a lot, but not really the solution for summer.
Racing Dan is offline  
Likes For Racing Dan:
Old 04-17-20, 04:54 PM
  #17  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,379

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3993 Post(s)
Liked 1,791 Times in 1,145 Posts
Originally Posted by Metallifan33 View Post
...(I wonder if it's a lot quieter inside the peloton)... My guess would be yes, but I wouldn't know as I've never ridden with anyone else.
It is much quieter in the middle of the pack, other than the sounds of the drivetrain and tires on pavement. Recent tests showed riding the middle of the pack expends the least energy. The air is very still, relative to the speed, and riders behind disrupt the airflow characteristics that can actually cause a little drag when riding at the back of the pack rather than middle.

Same principle used in designing aero kit -- skin suits, helmets, bikes, etc. Wind tunnel and computer modeling revealed some non-intuitive results -- a little disruption of the air flow can often be more efficient.

But it still requires testing or experience. I suspect the reason some folks have differing impressions of turbulence noise from the same helmet may be due to their preferred head/neck angle, ear shape, hair length (or bandannas or other head covering), etc. My older Bell helmet had a short flared tail extension that was popular with helmet designs in the mid-2000s. I could hear and feel slight differences depending on my head/neck angle. My POC helmet has no tail extension and seems less affected by head/neck angle. Same with my rounded aero helmet.

But riding the middle of the pack is risky in other ways, otherwise every rider would want that position in the peloton. It's easier to be trapped in a wreck, or be unable to respond to a breakaway. That's why many teams rehearse team tactics until they operate like clockwork, protecting the leader from wind resistance while rotating around him taking pulls. They work hard to prevent infiltrators from other teams disrupting the rotation, or boxing in the leader just before a mountain attack, etc.
canklecat is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 05:09 PM
  #18  
lesterburnham
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: NorCal
Posts: 21

Bikes: '18 Domane SL5

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 1 Post
A few folks I ride with use a generic product similar to Windblox (look it up - I can't post URL's)
I haven't used it but feedback seems positive.
lesterburnham is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 05:39 PM
  #19  
Ross520
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 316
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Liked 172 Times in 99 Posts
Originally Posted by MattTheHat View Post
I always ride with headphones. It helps cut down wind noise very well. As an added bonus I can listen to music. As another bonus I can take phone calls without stopping my ride. As an additional bonus it stops the wind noise from damaging my hearing.
So you canít hear approaching traffic or riders, your rides are interrupted by phone calls, and your hearing is being damaged by music instead of wind?

Sounds terrible.
Ross520 is offline  
Likes For Ross520:
Old 04-17-20, 05:54 PM
  #20  
MattTheHat 
Senior Member
 
MattTheHat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 1,811

Bikes: 2020 S-Works Creo SL, 2020 Specialized Roubaix Expert

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 583 Post(s)
Liked 2,165 Times in 757 Posts
Originally Posted by Ross520 View Post
So you can’t hear approaching traffic or riders, your rides are interrupted by phone calls, and your hearing is being damaged by music instead of wind?

Sounds terrible.
No, not at all. I don’t listen to the music load enough to damage my hearing. The phone calls are few and with people I enjoy talking to. Cars approaching, I don’t usually hear. Same as when I don’t have ear buds in place. And what would I do differently if I heard them approaching?

Other riders passing me? Right!
MattTheHat is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 06:11 PM
  #21  
Ross520
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 316
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Liked 172 Times in 99 Posts
Originally Posted by MattTheHat View Post
No, not at all. I donít listen to the music load enough to damage my hearing. The phone calls are few and with people I enjoy talking to. Cars approaching, I donít usually hear. Same as when I donít have ear buds in place. And what would I do differently if I heard them approaching?

Other riders passing me? Right!
Most people donít realize how loud earbud music actually is, especially considering you have to compensate (volume-wise) for road/wind noise and deep breathing.

What would you do if you knew a car was approaching? Iím surprised such an experienced rider doesnít know the answer to that question.

And Iím sure youíre quick, but thereís always someone faster. Do you hold KOMS on every single segment in your area? Iíd assume not, which means you are always at-risk of being passed by a faster, or fresher rider.
Ross520 is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 06:18 PM
  #22  
texaspandj
Senior Member
 
texaspandj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Heart Of Texas
Posts: 4,101

Bikes: '85, '86 , '87 , '88 , '89 Centurion Dave Scott Ironman.

Mentioned: 99 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1529 Post(s)
Liked 443 Times in 302 Posts
If you can hear a car approaching from the rear what difference does it make? However, if you can tell by the sound a car makes whether it's going to hit you or not, you are incredible.
Also, do you drive with the radio off too?
What about people who are deaf, how are they able to ride a bike?
texaspandj is offline  
Likes For texaspandj:
Old 04-17-20, 08:28 PM
  #23  
MattTheHat 
Senior Member
 
MattTheHat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Allen, TX
Posts: 1,811

Bikes: 2020 S-Works Creo SL, 2020 Specialized Roubaix Expert

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 583 Post(s)
Liked 2,165 Times in 757 Posts
Originally Posted by Ross520 View Post
Most people don’t realize how loud earbud music actually is, especially considering you have to compensate (volume-wise) for road/wind noise and deep breathing.

What would you do if you knew a car was approaching? I’m surprised such an experienced rider doesn’t know the answer to that question.

And I’m sure you’re quick, but there’s always someone faster. Do you hold KOMS on every single segment in your area? I’d assume not, which means you are always at-risk of being passed by a faster, or fresher rider.
I have a fairly in-depth knowledge of sound levels and hearing loss. I’m fully capable of determining appropriate sound levels for me. I would assume others are as well. My earpieces do a good job of blocking wind noise so I don’t need to compensate by turning the volume up. The same goes for breathing heavily.

Whether a car is approaching or not, I do the same thing. I try to hold a straight line. Do others really ride on the road looking back to see where each approaching car is? I trust that they see me and my blinking taillight and that they don’t want to hit me. If they want to hit me, I’m not going to be able to out maneuver a car. That leaves distracted driving. Do others really look at each approaching car and wonder if they’re going to try to jump the curb to avoid it? Maybe the drivers here are particularly respectful. If I thought I had to be aware of every single passing car in order to survive, I’d just ride the trainer at home.

The comment about not getting passed was humor. Even so, in about 65-70 hours of riding per month I get passed by one or two other riders per month. There just aren’t that many riders out when I’m riding. But there again, is passing another rider so dangerous? I just ride in a straight line, if another rider passes me, I trust him to do so safely.
MattTheHat is offline  
Old 04-17-20, 09:52 PM
  #24  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 9,390

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 102 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2788 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1,289 Times in 877 Posts
Originally Posted by ChrisAlbertson View Post
Is it just me or does this happen to everyone? When the wind speed over my head is up to maybe about 18 MPH the wind noise is loud enough that I don't hear much else.

I have an older bike with friction shifting so I like to listen for chain noise and move the shift levers to minimize the noise. The other day I was trying to listen for a squeak in the crank and then another time it was a once per tire revolution noise I could not hear. The solution is to wait for an uphill section where I slow.

Two days ago I was riding downhill at about 24 MPH (I'm a chicken on residential streets with driveways and intersections.) and some guy had to say "on your left" maybe five times before I noticed. (He was smart enough not to pass until I did notice then disappeared)

Another issue is tire and drivetrain noise from another bike. I can hear a bike following me if we are going downwind but in a headwind I'm deaf.

I wonder if different helmets are different in the amount of wind noise we hear. I know as we get older hearing is not so good and I am over 60 but I hear these things at low speed with no problem.
The answer you are looking for is Cat Ears. Fuzzy sleeves you put over your helmet straps. Cats have the real thing; whiskers in their ears, All to reduce the turbulence in the air flow. Owls do the same with hair-like feathers on their wings. No, not so they can hear but to silence the airflow so their prey cannot hear them glide in.

No respectable cyclist would be caught dead using them but they do work. Google Cat Ears. Probably first hit. (Was on Duck Duck Go.) I've never used them but can only make that same excuse. This might get me off my duff.

Ben
79pmooney is offline  
Old 04-18-20, 12:51 AM
  #25  
Ross520
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 316
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 173 Post(s)
Liked 172 Times in 99 Posts
Originally Posted by texaspandj View Post
If you can hear a car approaching from the rear what difference does it make? However, if you can tell by the sound a car makes whether it's going to hit you or not, you are incredible.
Also, do you drive with the radio off too?
What about people who are deaf, how are they able to ride a bike?
I get over as far right as possible... It's simple.

Also, operating a metal cage in the traffic lane and riding a bike on the shoulder are apples and oranges. But to answer your question, I listen to music at a reasonable volume, it is never too loud to hear horns or sirens.
Ross520 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.