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"Hotfoot" is going to prevent me from ever riding a century.

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"Hotfoot" is going to prevent me from ever riding a century.

Old 07-30-05, 12:33 AM
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"Hotfoot" is going to prevent me from ever riding a century.

At about the 30-35 mile mark in 100+ heat, I start getting the agonizing burn of hotfoot (Morton's Neuroma). I don't put my riding shoes on very tight and I have a Scholl's pad under the metatarsal as recommended, but it still burns, especially if I've been climbing for a long time.

Don't know what the solution is. Maybe some Sido Megas, but I really don't have that wide of a foot (C-D). My conditioning is getting so good after only 4 months riding that I know I have the endurance to ride longer distances, but I don't think I can make it to even a metric century without my feet flaming on.

Any suggestions? Thanks
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Old 07-30-05, 12:39 AM
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You may have already read this but here ya go:



How to Solve Painful 'Hot Foot'

By Fred Matheny for www.RoadBikeRider.com

In cycling, it’s known as “hot foot” -- a burning pain in the ball of the foot, perhaps radiating toward the toes. Severe cases feel like some sadistic demon is applying a blowtorch.

Hot foot occurs most often on long rides. It may develop sooner or more intensely on hilly courses because climbs cause greater pedaling pressure. The pain results when nerves are squeezed between the heads of each foot’s five long metatarsal bones. These heads are in the wide part of the foot (the “ball”) just behind the toes.

My worst case of hot foot occurred on a 3,400-mile, 24-day transcontinental ride. With an average distance of 140 miles per day, no rest days and more than 100,000 feet of vertical gain, my dogs were smoking by the third week.

My RBR partner, Ed Pavelka, remembers being in agony near the end of one 225-mile ride early in his long-distance career. It was his first experience with hot foot, and the problem plagued him that season until he changed to larger shoes. Feet always swell on long rides (more so in hot weather), causing pressure inside shoes that normally fit fine.

“Hot foot” is actually a misnomer. It’s not heat but rather pressure on nerves that causes the burning sensation. You’ll sometimes see riders squirting water on their pups in a vain attempt to put out the fire.

Besides tight shoes, another risk factor is small pedals, especially if you have large feet. Small pedal surfaces concentrate pressure on the ball of the foot instead of spreading it the way a larger pedal will. If your cycling shoes have flexible soles like most mountain bike shoes, they’ll be less able to diffuse pressure.

Before Ed figured out his shoe-size problem, he tried to solve the pain with cortisone injections. That’s an unnecessary extreme in most cases -- and it’s not fun to have a doctor stick a needle between your toes. Here are several better solutions.

*

Adjust shoe straps. It’s the top strap nearest your ankle that stops your feet from slopping around in your shoes. Tighten it as much as necessary, but keep the strap nearest your toes loose for maximum room.

*

Use thinner insoles and/or socks. This will give your feet more room to swell without restriction, especially helpful if your shoes are borderline snug.

*

Re-focus the pressure. Many riders solve hot foot by moving their cleats to the rear by as much as 8 mm. Long-distance enthusiast may go back as far as the cleat slots allow. They might even drill new rearward holes. After using this remedy, lower your saddle by the same amount if you moved your cleats backward 2-4 mm. If more than 4 mm, lower the saddle about half the amount. So, if your cleats go back 1 cm, put the saddle down 5 mm.

*

Add metatarsal buttons. These foam domes are placed on insoles (or are built into them) just behind the ball of the foot. They spread the metatarsal bones so the nerves running between them aren’t pinched by pressure or swelling. You can find these products in the foot-care section of drug stores.

*

Switch to larger pedals, for the reason mentioned above.

*

Buy new shoes. Look for a model with a wider-and-higher toe box, a stiffer sole and an anatomical footbed with a metatarsal button. One model that meets these specs is the Specialized BG, with versions for road and off-road.

*

Purchase custom orthotics. These plastic footbeds are supplied by podiatrists or sports medicine clinics. Among their biomechanical benefits are built-in metatarsal buttons. Be certain the practitioner understands you're a cyclist, because orthotics for runners are not what you need. Cycling is a forefoot activity, not a heel-strike activity.

For more information on hot foot, orthotics and other foot-related issues, see "Andy Pruitt’s Medical Guide for Cyclists," available as an eBook in the online eBookstore at RoadBikeRider.com.

Receive a FREE copy of the eBook “29 Pro Cycling Secrets for Roadies” by subscribing to the RoadBikeRider Newsletter at www.RoadBikeRider.com. No cost or obligation!
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Old 07-30-05, 01:49 AM
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Thanks for the info!



Originally Posted by TCR
You may have already read this but here ya go:



How to Solve Painful 'Hot Foot'

By Fred Matheny for www.RoadBikeRider.com

In cycling, it’s known as “hot foot” -- a burning pain in the ball of the foot, perhaps radiating toward the toes. Severe cases feel like some sadistic demon is applying a blowtorch.

Hot foot occurs most often on long rides. It may develop sooner or more intensely on hilly courses because climbs cause greater pedaling pressure. The pain results when nerves are squeezed between the heads of each foot’s five long metatarsal bones. These heads are in the wide part of the foot (the “ball”) just behind the toes.

My worst case of hot foot occurred on a 3,400-mile, 24-day transcontinental ride. With an average distance of 140 miles per day, no rest days and more than 100,000 feet of vertical gain, my dogs were smoking by the third week.

My RBR partner, Ed Pavelka, remembers being in agony near the end of one 225-mile ride early in his long-distance career. It was his first experience with hot foot, and the problem plagued him that season until he changed to larger shoes. Feet always swell on long rides (more so in hot weather), causing pressure inside shoes that normally fit fine.

“Hot foot” is actually a misnomer. It’s not heat but rather pressure on nerves that causes the burning sensation. You’ll sometimes see riders squirting water on their pups in a vain attempt to put out the fire.

Besides tight shoes, another risk factor is small pedals, especially if you have large feet. Small pedal surfaces concentrate pressure on the ball of the foot instead of spreading it the way a larger pedal will. If your cycling shoes have flexible soles like most mountain bike shoes, they’ll be less able to diffuse pressure.

Before Ed figured out his shoe-size problem, he tried to solve the pain with cortisone injections. That’s an unnecessary extreme in most cases -- and it’s not fun to have a doctor stick a needle between your toes. Here are several better solutions.

*

Adjust shoe straps. It’s the top strap nearest your ankle that stops your feet from slopping around in your shoes. Tighten it as much as necessary, but keep the strap nearest your toes loose for maximum room.

*

Use thinner insoles and/or socks. This will give your feet more room to swell without restriction, especially helpful if your shoes are borderline snug.

*

Re-focus the pressure. Many riders solve hot foot by moving their cleats to the rear by as much as 8 mm. Long-distance enthusiast may go back as far as the cleat slots allow. They might even drill new rearward holes. After using this remedy, lower your saddle by the same amount if you moved your cleats backward 2-4 mm. If more than 4 mm, lower the saddle about half the amount. So, if your cleats go back 1 cm, put the saddle down 5 mm.

*

Add metatarsal buttons. These foam domes are placed on insoles (or are built into them) just behind the ball of the foot. They spread the metatarsal bones so the nerves running between them aren’t pinched by pressure or swelling. You can find these products in the foot-care section of drug stores.

*

Switch to larger pedals, for the reason mentioned above.

*

Buy new shoes. Look for a model with a wider-and-higher toe box, a stiffer sole and an anatomical footbed with a metatarsal button. One model that meets these specs is the Specialized BG, with versions for road and off-road.

*

Purchase custom orthotics. These plastic footbeds are supplied by podiatrists or sports medicine clinics. Among their biomechanical benefits are built-in metatarsal buttons. Be certain the practitioner understands you're a cyclist, because orthotics for runners are not what you need. Cycling is a forefoot activity, not a heel-strike activity.

For more information on hot foot, orthotics and other foot-related issues, see "Andy Pruitt’s Medical Guide for Cyclists," available as an eBook in the online eBookstore at RoadBikeRider.com.

Receive a FREE copy of the eBook “29 Pro Cycling Secrets for Roadies” by subscribing to the RoadBikeRider Newsletter at www.RoadBikeRider.com. No cost or obligation!
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Old 07-30-05, 09:08 AM
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I had the hot foot problem and the cause of it for me was that the shoe was too stiff, Shimano road shoe, so I bought a mtn type shoe that had a little flex in it and got a wider pedal too. That solve my problem pretty much. Note: it was the balls of my feet that felt painful on long rides. Having a high arch with a pronouced ball of feet made that a focrum pressure spot for me.
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Old 07-30-05, 09:13 AM
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Everyone says get a wider pedal but IMO this isn't always the cure. I was getting a nasty hot spot on the outside of my foot until I got the Lemond Lewedges. If you haven't tried these I would suggest trying to find a place that does fittings and give them a shot. My feet haven't burned since I put them in.
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Old 07-30-05, 09:15 AM
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I get this from time to time and found the article posted by TCR to be helpful.

Some additional things I've found help ease the discomfort:
- On centuries and long rides in particular, take your shoes off at the rest stops as soon as you get there, flex and stretch your feet as you walk around
- During the ride, make an effort to wiggle your toes (if you've loosened the toe straps as suggested above you should be able to without much trouble). You can even do this while pedaling.
- Try Superfeet inserts

Good luck, hope you solve the problem!
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Old 07-30-05, 09:34 AM
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Awsome post! I've found my hot foot problem to be almost always caused by bad clete posistion. But im gonna look for those orthodics.
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Old 07-30-05, 10:51 AM
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Are you sure that it is Morton's Neuroma? Had it looked at and diagnosed?
If it is Morton's, you have my sympathy.

My wife had it in one foot, and a few years later in the other.

TCR has the basic good-advise - shoe fit, pedal, cleats, orthotics, also cortisone shots. If nothing else works, there is surgery. Out-patient procedure where the doctor cuts the nerve that is causing the problem. That is what finally helped my wife.
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Old 07-30-05, 10:56 AM
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Do you spin in circles? Have you tried giving your feet a bit of a break by spending some time pulling UP with your pedals?
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Old 07-30-05, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by filtersweep
Do you spin in circles? Have you tried giving your feet a bit of a break by spending some time pulling UP with your pedals?
Yeah I pull up, but the same thing happened when I used to race in-line skates. Suregey may be the solution!
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Old 07-30-05, 09:29 PM
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Perhaps give Shimano SPD sandals a try. You can still be in OCP with the right pair of socks.
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Old 07-30-05, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Camel
Perhaps give Shimano SPD sandals a try. You can still be in OCP with the right pair of socks.
I like those sandals, especially out here in the balmy 110 degree summer cool.

BTW, Only eurotrash wear socks with their sandals!
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Old 07-31-05, 08:43 AM
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Tradition always was to wear very tight-fitting shoes....but that was based on the exclusive use of leather shoes and toe clips/straps.
Try picking up some shoes made of leather. They mould to your feet better, stretch a bit, when required.
Greg Lemond was plagued with this when he had a shoe deal with Brancale and was wearing some plasticky abominations........

Cotton socks and a pedal with a wide platform might help, as others have mentioned.
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Old 07-31-05, 08:53 AM
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Find a sports medicine doc that specializes in cycling and/ or orthapedics. You usually wont pay more than a regular doc visit/ consult, if it's for pain/ disease your insurance will cover it, and they specialize in this stuff.
If sports med doc's can get a one legged cyclist riding with a prothesis they can figure out your foot thing...
Good luck.
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Old 07-31-05, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by biodiesel
Find a sports medicine doc that specializes in cycling and/ or orthapedics. You usually wont pay more than a regular doc visit/ consult, if it's for pain/ disease your insurance will cover it, and they specialize in this stuff.
If sports med doc's can get a one legged cyclist riding with a prothesis they can figure out your foot thing...
Good luck.
Take biodiesel's advice and go to a sports medicine clinic.
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Old 07-31-05, 10:52 AM
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If you have the bucks - go to an expert -but you can make your own orthotic to reduce hotfoot quite a bit.

And like others have mentioned, at every stop, take a few seconds to remove the shoe and exercise and rub the foot. (even before it hurts)
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Old 07-31-05, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by TCR
You may have already read this but here ya go:



How to Solve Painful 'Hot Foot'

By Fred Matheny for www.RoadBikeRider.com

In cycling, it’s known as “hot foot” -- a burning pain in the ball of the foot, perhaps radiating toward the toes. Severe cases feel like some sadistic demon is applying a blowtorch.

Hot foot occurs most often on long rides. It may develop sooner or more intensely on hilly courses because climbs cause greater pedaling pressure. The pain results when nerves are squeezed between the heads of each foot’s five long metatarsal bones. These heads are in the wide part of the foot (the “ball”) just behind the toes.

My worst case of hot foot occurred on a 3,400-mile, 24-day transcontinental ride. With an average distance of 140 miles per day, no rest days and more than 100,000 feet of vertical gain, my dogs were smoking by the third week.

My RBR partner, Ed Pavelka, remembers being in agony near the end of one 225-mile ride early in his long-distance career. It was his first experience with hot foot, and the problem plagued him that season until he changed to larger shoes. Feet always swell on long rides (more so in hot weather), causing pressure inside shoes that normally fit fine.

“Hot foot” is actually a misnomer. It’s not heat but rather pressure on nerves that causes the burning sensation. You’ll sometimes see riders squirting water on their pups in a vain attempt to put out the fire.

Besides tight shoes, another risk factor is small pedals, especially if you have large feet. Small pedal surfaces concentrate pressure on the ball of the foot instead of spreading it the way a larger pedal will. If your cycling shoes have flexible soles like most mountain bike shoes, they’ll be less able to diffuse pressure.

Before Ed figured out his shoe-size problem, he tried to solve the pain with cortisone injections. That’s an unnecessary extreme in most cases -- and it’s not fun to have a doctor stick a needle between your toes. Here are several better solutions.

*

Adjust shoe straps. It’s the top strap nearest your ankle that stops your feet from slopping around in your shoes. Tighten it as much as necessary, but keep the strap nearest your toes loose for maximum room.

*

Use thinner insoles and/or socks. This will give your feet more room to swell without restriction, especially helpful if your shoes are borderline snug.

*

Re-focus the pressure. Many riders solve hot foot by moving their cleats to the rear by as much as 8 mm. Long-distance enthusiast may go back as far as the cleat slots allow. They might even drill new rearward holes. After using this remedy, lower your saddle by the same amount if you moved your cleats backward 2-4 mm. If more than 4 mm, lower the saddle about half the amount. So, if your cleats go back 1 cm, put the saddle down 5 mm.

*

Add metatarsal buttons. These foam domes are placed on insoles (or are built into them) just behind the ball of the foot. They spread the metatarsal bones so the nerves running between them aren’t pinched by pressure or swelling. You can find these products in the foot-care section of drug stores.

*

Switch to larger pedals, for the reason mentioned above.

*

Buy new shoes. Look for a model with a wider-and-higher toe box, a stiffer sole and an anatomical footbed with a metatarsal button. One model that meets these specs is the Specialized BG, with versions for road and off-road.

*

Purchase custom orthotics. These plastic footbeds are supplied by podiatrists or sports medicine clinics. Among their biomechanical benefits are built-in metatarsal buttons. Be certain the practitioner understands you're a cyclist, because orthotics for runners are not what you need. Cycling is a forefoot activity, not a heel-strike activity.

For more information on hot foot, orthotics and other foot-related issues, see "Andy Pruitt’s Medical Guide for Cyclists," available as an eBook in the online eBookstore at RoadBikeRider.com.

Receive a FREE copy of the eBook “29 Pro Cycling Secrets for Roadies” by subscribing to the RoadBikeRider Newsletter at www.RoadBikeRider.com. No cost or obligation!


WOW thak you very much this is a great start
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