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CAAD13 Rim Brake Weight

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CAAD13 Rim Brake Weight

Old 12-06-23, 04:07 PM
  #26  
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I don't actually have any recommendations, as the one RideNow TPU tube that I bought hasn't yet been installed. That said, one of the ways they get the weight down is to use a plastic valve stem. No particular positive/negative views on that, just that it's different. One thing I've read about TPU is that they're better on the wheel, rather than as a spare, as the freezing CO2 temperatures could potentially crack the TPU plastic (or valve). They're much more likely to be inflated by a floor pump at home, which doesn't cause the same kind of stress.

I'm 5'10", and while I'm weight conscious when I'm selecting parts, but I'm not especially weight weenie. I was able to fluctuate between upper 170s and low 180s for a while, but any time I got too close to 170lbs, I'd invariably get sick. These days I'm floating in the mid 190s, and definitely need to lay off the pie once the holidays are done.

I'd be happy to be able to hold 170-175!
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Old 12-06-23, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by aliasfox
I don't actually have any recommendations, as the one RideNow TPU tube that I bought hasn't yet been installed. That said, one of the ways they get the weight down is to use a plastic valve stem. No particular positive/negative views on that, just that it's different. One thing I've read about TPU is that they're better on the wheel, rather than as a spare, as the freezing CO2 temperatures could potentially crack the TPU plastic (or valve). They're much more likely to be inflated by a floor pump at home, which doesn't cause the same kind of stress.

I'm 5'10", and while I'm weight conscious when I'm selecting parts, but I'm not especially weight weenie. I was able to fluctuate between upper 170s and low 180s for a while, but any time I got too close to 170lbs, I'd invariably get sick. These days I'm floating in the mid 190s, and definitely need to lay off the pie once the holidays are done.

I'd be happy to be able to hold 170-175!
I ride RideNow Ultralights and I can confirm doesn't use CO2, mostly because they use plastic valves. I got one of those micro electric pumps that fit into your saddlebag or back pocket, but a handpump would work fine too
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Old 12-06-23, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Jrasero
I ride RideNow Ultralights and I can confirm doesn't use CO2, mostly because they use plastic valves. I got one of those micro electric pumps that fit into your saddlebag or back pocket, but a handpump would work fine too
Today I learned that there are micro electric pumps that take up about as much space as a tube. Neat.
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Old 12-07-23, 01:11 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche
Why would I buy alloy wheels when I already have lightweight alloy wheels. Why would I get a sram group when I already have an R8000 Ultegra group? I'm so confused.
Sorry, I missed where you listed all the specific the parts on your bike, definitely missed the wheels. I was making a generic comment. But in general, I stick to the comment that it often is not a good "bang for buck" to go to CF wheels compared to nice alloy ones (which you say you already have... but I didn't catch the weight. Also, in general, if a person is serious about getting to a goal weight (BTDT), they would look at the group that is lightest that fits their budget. There might be lighter options than Ultegra since you're looking at investing in a lighter overall bike. No offense intended.

Last edited by Camilo; 12-07-23 at 01:15 AM.
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Old 12-13-23, 05:04 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by Camilo
Sorry, I missed where you listed all the specific the parts on your bike, definitely missed the wheels. I was making a generic comment. But in general, I stick to the comment that it often is not a good "bang for buck" to go to CF wheels compared to nice alloy ones (which you say you already have... but I didn't catch the weight. Also, in general, if a person is serious about getting to a goal weight (BTDT), they would look at the group that is lightest that fits their budget. There might be lighter options than Ultegra since you're looking at investing in a lighter overall bike. No offense intended.
Yeah, that's totally true re being lighter groupsets. I picked this bike up used with an ultegra groupset so I think that's what will stay. It's not a no expense spared weenie build since I'd have started with a totally different frameset if doing that, likely an older rim brake supersix evo hi mod or the like. I've actually debated picking up one of those framesets and moving parts over from the CAAD13 and selling the frameset. The stack on the supersix is a bit too low for me but I think I can make it work with some bars I like that have a slight rise to them.

Besides, the PO of this caad13 cut the steerer way too short. He apparently worked at a shop and I believe he did it incorrectly as well so that ends with my having much less steerer than I'd anticipated having. Womp.
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Old 12-16-23, 02:25 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by ridethecliche
Yeah, that's totally true re being lighter groupsets. I picked this bike up used with an ultegra groupset so I think that's what will stay. It's not a no expense spared weenie build since I'd have started with a totally different frameset if doing that, likely an older rim brake supersix evo hi mod or the like. I've actually debated picking up one of those framesets and moving parts over from the CAAD13 and selling the frameset. The stack on the supersix is a bit too low for me but I think I can make it work with some bars I like that have a slight rise to them.

Besides, the PO of this caad13 cut the steerer way too short. He apparently worked at a shop and I believe he did it incorrectly as well so that ends with my having much less steerer than I'd anticipated having. Womp.
I have a friend, an "active senior" like myself who is a life long rider and former racer. His back became creakier the past few years. He has a Super 6 which he finally decided just didn't have enough stack for his current riding. So, he bit the bullet, and got a higer angled stem. It hurt his pride and caused some personal embarrassment (in his own mind, probably not from any of the folks we ride with). But he soon forgot it when he realized it didn't slow him down and made the bike much more comfortable.

Me? I had a CAAD 7 or 8 frame with Ultegra back in the day and loved the frame, state of the art for aluminum frames and of course the group worked flawlessly. The fit was never great as I got older, even though the steerer wasn't cut so I could max out the spacers under the stem. So I decided to get a frame that was both lighter weight and also had a taller head tube - a Felt CF Z frameset (many other similar options). Probably could have gotten the same with an angled stem, although the Z also has a slightly longer wheel base which I like for my riding. I've used it as the benchmark for selecting and equipping three more frames since. But, in terms of weight, I'll have to say, that old aluminum CAAD frameset with a CF fork wasn't an anchor by any means, I'll assume it's still the case with CAAD frames. Plus, I personally never felt the aluminum ride was inherently harsher in any meaningful way than my CF, steel or titanium frames - other than what can be accounted for by geometry and tires. I bet I only saved less than 1/2 pound, maybe 1/4 (<300 gm?) pound going to the CF frame with a similar fork. More weight can probably be saved nowadays. Back then, a 1,000 gm frame was pretty good.

Since I was building it up from the frame with mostly closeout and some lightly used parts, I went with Sram Red (10 speed rim brake era). I then found that, for me, the ergonomics of the Sram shifting worked better for me personally, so it was a double benefit - a few ounces of weight and more comfortable hoods and shifting. I've stuck with Sram since because of the ergonomics, not the weight. Again, minor stuff, a few ounces here and there, but for similar cost of some components, you can save those ounces without breaking the bank. Did the same with pedals (Time) bars, seat post, stem, tires and tubes, even bottle cages, again bargain hunting along the way. I have been very fortunate to find my favorite saddle (E3 Form, AKA Kontact) which works for me but is also decently light. A weight weenie hobby at the time; it was fun but irrelevant for "performance" and I got it out of my system.
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Old 12-16-23, 02:33 PM
  #32  
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Lighting was hard for the pictures but here it is!

Longest ride on this thing so far at 60 miles. It felt really really good to the point that I'm really surprised.

The fit is very aggressive for me since the PO cut off way too much steerer but I'm making do in spite of that. I have some Ritchey bars coming that have a bit of rise to them so that should help, though I'm tempted to just keep these ones on since they're a bit lighter 🙃

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Old 02-17-24, 10:17 AM
  #33  
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Got a reasonable scale.

Current weight is 17.9 lbs with pedals, cages, and mounts. I'd love to get it down to the 16s.

So far I have TPU tubes ordered but the carbon wheels I have are actually heavier than my light weight alloys though they're much more aero at 50mm.

I have a lighter stem on hand and I'm still considering the bontrager light weight direct mount brakes since that's another like 100g compared to my ultegra ones.

​​​I could put the TPU tubes in the alloy wheels as well since Im currently running heavy butyl tubes.

I think all that might shed most of a pound right?
Tubes, brakes, and stem.

Tires are all gp5k 28s.

How much lighter are the bonty speed stop pro brakes than the r8000 direct mounts anyway?

Last edited by ridethecliche; 02-17-24 at 10:26 AM.
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Old 02-17-24, 12:32 PM
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Unless your current stem is really heavy and your new stem is really light, I wouldn't expect there to be more than 10-15g between them.

TPU tubes should definitely help to the tune of 100g a piece (unless you're already running Continental Race Lights, in which case you'll likely only save ~50-60g a piece). Just be aware that TPU is perhaps a bit more sensitive to heat than butyl - the plastic valves aren't happy with CO2, so I'd avoid using one as a spare if you intend to fill with CO2. Also, supposedly they're not very happy with heat either, so if this bike has any long bombing runs in its future (say, 3mi @ -7% or bigger?), may want to switch back to butyl for those.

This will likely impact performance, but you could probably get some skinny time trial oriented tires which might trim 30g a piece from the GP5k. Don't expect them to last long though, neither from a tread nor a puncture resistance perspective.

Your bar is wrapped all the way to the tops. If you don't ride on the bar-tops, inboard of the hoods, you can trim off that bit.

It might make sense to keep the carbon wheels, GP5k, and butyl tubes for a more 'all purpose' configuration, and swap that out for the shallow alloys, TPU, and super light tires for weight weenie/hill climb.
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