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Custom Ti Frame

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Custom Ti Frame

Old 01-10-10, 07:57 AM
  #1  
Aed
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Custom Ti Frame

I posted this same thread on the triathlon forum, but my question about the dual junction seat stays is relevant to regular road cycling too.

https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...riathlon-Frame

I have been looking at buying a triathlon frame from Pride Cycles, but I cannot find anyone who actually has one of their bikes. Before I get too serious about buying one, I was wondering if anyone had any information about their frames. (There is a small post about them on a different website's forums, but I didn't want to get yelled at for linking other forums)

Here is a link to their triathlon frame web page:
https://www.pridecyclesusa.com/TriFrames.html

When I spoke to the owner, he made it sound as if all of their triathlon frames have dual junction seat stays (which I haven't seen before). He stated that it improves lateral stiffness, but I would like more opinions.

Here is a link to what their road frames look like (including pictures of their dual junction seat stay system):
https://www.pridecyclesusa.com/RoadFrames.html

Does anyone have any opinions about these frames and the viability of racing of one?
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Old 01-10-10, 08:15 AM
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well i would have to say that anytime you add another triangle structure to a frame you will increase stiffness from a relative standpoint, however there are plenty of mfgs that achieve more than adequate stiffness without the "dual junctions" so i would argue that they would be unnecessary on a properly designed frame.

personally i dont like the way they look at all.
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Old 01-10-10, 08:18 AM
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If your just starting out, why a little known builder? Why not a Lynskey, or more well known builder with a longer track record?
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Old 01-10-10, 08:19 AM
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I have never seen, much less ridden a Pride bike. However I have a ti bike and used to own a GT, which also used a "dual junction" geometry. My observations:

1. I love ti frames for my road bike, but I don't have a clue if they are a good choice for a TT bike.
2. That "dual junction" geometry will definitely stiffen the bike and the ride, maybe to a point where the vibration dampening qualities of titanium are lost. My GT was an aluminum frame and a 25 mile ride on it would shake the fillings right out of your teeth. I've heard from others that Cervelo's aluminum P1 TT bike feels the same way. But that's supposed to be no big deal to triathletes.
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Old 01-10-10, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by AngryScientist View Post
well i would have to say that anytime you add another triangle structure to a frame you will increase stiffness from a relative standpoint, however there are plenty of mfgs that achieve more than adequate stiffness without the "dual junctions" so i would argue that they would be unnecessary on a properly designed frame.

personally i dont like the way they look at all.
That is the cheesiest looking website I have ever seen. And the bikes look cheesy. Of course the bikes may actually be wonderful. The typos on the website don't help.
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Old 01-10-10, 09:13 AM
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The owner is the former plant manager at Litespeed from what I can tell.
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Old 01-10-10, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by WHOOOSSHHH... View Post
If your just starting out, why a little known builder? Why not a Lynskey, or more well known builder with a longer track record?
I have been looking at titanium frames from Lynskey, Guru, and Javelin. I just saw this company and was wondering if their claims about the strange looking seat stay's abilities were legit and to see if anyone knew anything about the company.

Originally Posted by bigtea View Post
I have never seen, much less ridden a Pride bike. However I have a ti bike and used to own a GT, which also used a "dual junction" geometry. My observations:

1. I love ti frames for my road bike, but I don't have a clue if they are a good choice for a TT bike.
2. That "dual junction" geometry will definitely stiffen the bike and the ride, maybe to a point where the vibration dampening qualities of titanium are lost. My GT was an aluminum frame and a 25 mile ride on it would shake the fillings right out of your teeth. I've heard from others that Cervelo's aluminum P1 TT bike feels the same way. But that's supposed to be no big deal to triathletes.
I'm mainly looking into titanium because I travel a lot with my job and I have heard too many stories about airlines destroying carbon frames. I actually spent a good amount of time looking at the 2010 Cervelo P1 and everything I've seen about it says that it's great, except for a harsh ride.

Thanks for the help, everyone.
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Old 01-10-10, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Grumpy McTrumpy View Post
The owner is the former plant manager at Litespeed from what I can tell.
Yeah, when I talked to him, he said that he worked there for a long time (I don't remember the exact amount), but I wasn't sure how much a plant manager had to do with actually building and designing the frames (I know that my boss has no idea what we do all day, so I wasn't sure if they had the same disconnect with what actually happens).
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Old 01-10-10, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Aed View Post
I have been looking at titanium frames from Lynskey, Guru, and Javelin. I just saw this company and was wondering if their claims about the strange looking seat stay's abilities were legit and to see if anyone knew anything about the company.



I'm mainly looking into titanium because I travel a lot with my job and I have heard too many stories about airlines destroying carbon frames. I actually spent a good amount of time looking at the 2010 Cervelo P1 and everything I've seen about it says that it's great, except for a harsh ride.

Thanks for the help, everyone.
If you want durability then ti is definitely the answer. Have you looked for a Litespeed TT bike on ebay? This year they've gone to carbon, but I'd think there are some used ones on sale at a good price.
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Old 01-10-10, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by patentcad View Post
And the bikes look cheesy..

This is one ugly bike. If the "dual junction" seat stays are for stiffness, I'm not sure why you would need it on a frame for a smaller rider (like this one). This frame also looks small enough that the builder could have considered 650c wheels.



However, their prices seem great. I'd see if they had made a few "normal" looking bikes before pulling the trigger.
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Old 01-10-10, 09:33 AM
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Ti is the most durable high performance frame material of course. No doubt about that.
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Old 01-10-10, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by BengeBoy View Post
This is one ugly bike. If the "dual junction" seat stays are for stiffness, I'm not sure why you would need it on a frame for a smaller rider (like this one). This frame also looks small enough that the builder could have considered 650c wheels.



However, their prices seem great. I'd see if they had made a few "normal" looking bikes before pulling the trigger.

yes, it appears to be approaching crank arm overlap if it got any smaller.
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Old 01-10-10, 09:37 AM
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according to their website they also make traditional geometries and traditional rear triangles.

I would seriously consider getting one of their frames at that price if I were looking to replace my training bike. I might do so anyway since that bike is not the most comfy ride.
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Old 01-10-10, 09:38 AM
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..
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Old 01-10-10, 11:08 AM
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Here's a Litespeed Saber on ebay that is ready to go for triathlons...save yourself the $$ and get a used one

https://cgi.ebay.com/Litespeed-Saber-...item3ca919dbec
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