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Tools And Other Essential Things for Your Ride??

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Tools And Other Essential Things for Your Ride??

Old 05-11-11, 03:36 PM
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johnq251
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Tools And Other Essential Things for Your Ride??

So when I went out for my ride today I got a flat, and didn't have any tools to be able to fix it, or spares or even really know how to fix it. I went to my bike shop and got it fixed, he showed me how to do it, and I bought a spare tube, I also got a patch kit and tire levers.

So it got me thinking about what else could go wrong, and getting stranded a lot further than the two miles today. Since I am new to this I am learning as I go. What does everyone always make sure to have with them when out on a ride, tools or otherwise??
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Old 05-11-11, 03:40 PM
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A patch kit, spare tube, and a pump / CO2... and at minimum, a small multi tool with a chain breaker.
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Old 05-11-11, 03:52 PM
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If you have a flat proof system in your tyres, like my ussual bike, I only carry a patch kit and a multi tool

If you can, carry a extra tube, multi tool, air pump, and a patch kit

A patch kit is:
What you need to dismount your wheels
Tires levers, 3 of them. Two for the work, one in case one breaks
Peel and stick patches
sand paper, make sure you upgrade from that scratching tool they mostly give you. Sand paper works better imo

A air pump is best a compact co2 pump. Online they are cheap. Make sure they fit your valve system and get extra cans. Carry three cans on a ride

You can also buy a body pump or clip on pump, yet they are a little cumbersome and won't deliver higher compression.

If you go C02, MAKE SURE YOU PICK UP YOUR EMPTY CANISTERS AND TUBES!!!!
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Old 05-11-11, 03:55 PM
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I think I would much prefer 2 extra tubes to a patch kit. Past that its bumming from a club mate or getting out the cell phone.
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Old 05-11-11, 04:01 PM
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Originally Posted by BotByte
If you have a flat proof system in your tyres, like my ussual bike, I only carry a patch kit and a multi tool

If you can, carry a extra tube, multi tool, air pump, and a patch kit

A patch kit is:
What you need to dismount your wheels
Tires levers, 3 of them. Two for the work, one in case one breaks
Peel and stick patches
sand paper, make sure you upgrade from that scratching tool they mostly give you. Sand paper works better imo

A air pump is best a compact co2 pump. Online they are cheap. Make sure they fit your valve system and get extra cans. Carry three cans on a ride

You can also buy a body pump or clip on pump, yet they are a little cumbersome and won't deliver higher compression.

If you go C02, MAKE SURE YOU PICK UP YOUR EMPTY CANISTERS AND TUBES!!!!
If your tyres are flat proof... why carry a patch kit ?

Sounds like the last frame pump you bought was in the sixties as high pressure frame pumps have been available for decades.

My frame pump will work up to 120 psi and does so with relative ease and is infinately re-useable..
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Old 05-11-11, 04:14 PM
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I usually carry a spare tubular and CO2 and spoke wrench. some times I carry a 5/6 double end wrench and a wrench for recentering brakes and spoke wrench.

if you bike is in good shape and you do a PM check once a week you should not reallt need tools on the road.

whenever I sold a bike I tried to sell, a seat bag filled with tube, levers, and patch kit plus a frame pump with it

I used to tell my customers two things. "never ride further from home then you care to walk back home without stuff to fix a flat". and "if someone comes along and knows how to fix a flat, he may not have what you need"
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Old 05-11-11, 04:30 PM
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To be frank, if you are a new rider never leaving city limits or venturing into unfriendly neighborhoods your ever present cell phone will suffice. Carrying a spare tube, any of a number of things to reinflate the tire, ID/credit card, and learning how to change a tire without levers will get you farther down the road and get you out of any urbane problems that arise off the bike.
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Old 05-11-11, 04:56 PM
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Originally Posted by johnq251
So when I went out for my ride today I got a flat, and didn't have any tools to be able to fix it, or spares or even really know how to fix it. I went to my bike shop and got it fixed, he showed me how to do it, and I bought a spare tube, I also got a patch kit and tire levers.

So it got me thinking about what else could go wrong, and getting stranded a lot further than the two miles today. Since I am new to this I am learning as I go. What does everyone always make sure to have with them when out on a ride, tools or otherwise??
Spoke wrench (can straighten a bent wheel enough to make it ridable),
5mm allen wrench (can attach a broken derailleur cable to a water bottle bolt), chain tool (can shorten a broken chain and ride home. would also need a removable link for 10/11/Shimano 9 speed chains).
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Old 05-11-11, 05:01 PM
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multi tool, 2 tubes, co2 dispenser, 2 cartridges, cell phone, credit card, $21.
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Old 05-11-11, 05:22 PM
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Originally Posted by RUOkie
multi tool, 2 tubes, co2 dispenser, 2 cartridges, cell phone, credit card, $21.
The extra dollar earmarked for a tire boot?

This is a good list. I never ride with a credit card though. Losing it along the way would suck and a twenty dollar bill is all I will ever need for refueling.

Reality check: You'll only need to deal with a flat tire maybe 2-5 times a year, depending on mileage. I get in ~ 5000 miles per year and get, on average, two flats a year. For MAYBE every ten flats you'll have some other mechanical issue (chain breaks, cable lets go, crash damage etc). So perhaps once every 3-5 years or so. I've been road biking for close to four years and have never had a bike issue other than a flat. Mountain biking is a different animal - it's easy to whack a RD out of adjustment on a rock or tweak a spoke. Plus it's easier to find a kind soul who will give you a ride on your walk of shame when you are on asphalt versus a trail.

Thus, for a well-tuned bike, RUOkie's list is good enough. Without the credit card. And even without the multi-tool.
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Old 05-11-11, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by palesaint
Thus, for a well-tuned bike, RUOkie's list is good enough. Without the credit card. And even without the multi-tool.
Preventative steps go a long ways.
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Old 05-11-11, 05:47 PM
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I carry in a seat bag stuffed tight:
Multi tool with chain breaker
sram power link in case a link fails or something ********
Tube
Two tire levelers
Two co2 carts or frame pump
Patches
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Old 05-11-11, 06:01 PM
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I am a reasonable bike mechanic and I carry 2 co2 containers and dispenser, 3 tire levers, spare tube, mini pump, set of allen wrenches 2.5 to 6. This should handle most things. At this point I never use the allen wretches they are more for adjustments and I have long ago dialed in my fit, but they don't take up too much room. The mini pump fits in the rear saddle bag only 6 inches long and frankly it has endless air and can get to 100 psi with work. The co2 saves time but I have lost them on cold days filling up and not getting enough air in the tube.

No patch kit way too much trouble on the ride. I can swap a tube and repair hole at home. Probably safe most of the time but on a century a spare tube in the jersey pocket is not out of the question. This all fits in my very small cheap "BELL" saddle bag but it is stuff full.
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Old 05-11-11, 06:50 PM
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A few dollars, 2 co2's, tube, iphone (for calls and to see where I am or how to get home on a wandering ride), a headband for when the sweat starts running in my eyes.
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Old 06-01-11, 02:58 PM
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I had my first flat the other day. I've been searching but couldn't find if it's recommended to patch road tubes. Riding at 90psi. Possibly dangerous and leakage due to high pressure?

Last edited by skunk3; 06-01-11 at 03:06 PM.
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Old 06-01-11, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by skunk3
I had my first flat the other day. I've been searching but couldn't find if it's recommended to patch road tubes. Riding at 90psi. Possibly dangerous and leakage due to high pressure?
Yes you should patch road tubes.

Best technique is to patch at home when you have time. So take spare tube with you and maybe a patch kit in case you have really bad luck.

Search "Batch Patch" for my recommended procedure for patching tubes.
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Old 06-01-11, 03:27 PM
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Originally Posted by skunk3
I had my first flat the other day. I've been searching but couldn't find if it's recommended to patch road tubes. Riding at 90psi. Possibly dangerous and leakage due to high pressure?
It's OK to patch them and they'll hold if done properly.

I carry a spare tube and will use that first and if I get another flat I'll try patching that.

Now the most important thing I'll carry is a cell phone and an idea who to call.
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Old 06-01-11, 03:29 PM
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Originally Posted by datlas
Yes you should patch road tubes.

Best technique is to patch at home when you have time. So take spare tube with you and maybe a patch kit in case you have really bad luck.

Search "Batch Patch" for my recommended procedure for patching tubes.
And I say just throw 'em away and bring in a fresh one. They're cheap enough.
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Old 06-01-11, 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by skunk3
I had my first flat the other day. I've been searching but couldn't find if it's recommended to patch road tubes. Riding at 90psi. Possibly dangerous and leakage due to high pressure?
Actually, it's probably a pinch flat, they occur when you don't have enough tire pressure (110-125psi). The tube scrunches up due to a bump, and pinches itself, resulting in a hole.
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Old 06-01-11, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Bioluminescence
Actually, it's probably a pinch flat, they occur when you don't have enough tire pressure (110-125psi). The tube scrunches up due to a bump, and pinches itself, resulting in a hole.
Sorry but I highly suspect 90PSI is closer to enough tire pressure than 110-125. Unless you are a major fattie 110-125 is too much.
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Old 06-01-11, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by datlas
Sorry but I highly suspect 90PSI is closer to enough tire pressure than 110-125. Unless you are a major fattie 110-125 is too much.
I only weigh 115lbs. Coincidentally, I run my tires at 115 (mostly due to a bunch of crap roads out here). Anything lower than 110 and you get [more] pinch flats and even less efficiency while riding.

Besides, my major point was that it wasn't due to 'high pressure'.

(By the way, just noticed italicization doesn't show up in quotes. Is there a forum for recommending HTML updates here?)
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Old 06-01-11, 03:44 PM
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I carry spare tubes in a resealable plastic bag with talcum powder. And a set of rubber gloves.
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Old 06-01-11, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Bioluminescence
I only weigh 115lbs. Coincidentally, I run my tires at 115 (mostly due to a bunch of crap roads out here). Anything lower than 110 and you get [more] pinch flats and even less efficiency while riding.

Besides, my major point was that it wasn't due to 'high pressure'.

(By the way, just noticed italicization doesn't show up in quotes. Is there a forum for recommending HTML updates here?)
You can send a note to the mods, but this forum notoriously SUCKS when it comes to these things.

I don't ride on the same roads you do, so for you maybe the PSI you are running is right for you.

But even on annoying chipseal I run 95-100PSI which prevents pinch flats and is much better for me than 115. BTW I weigh about 145 pounds.

Do you really get pinch flats if you drop your pressure to 95?!? If you haven't tried it before you may wish to.
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Old 06-01-11, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by datlas
Do you really get pinch flats if you drop your pressure to 95?!? If you haven't tried it before you may wish to.
I got a pinch flat about a week ago running at 80-90psi on my front tire when I hit a pretty bad crack in the road.
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Old 06-01-11, 03:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Bioluminescence
I got a pinch flat about a week ago running at 80-90psi on my front tire when I hit a pretty bad crack in the road.
Running a higher PSI is certainly a trade-off. Most cyclists pump their tires up to the "max PSI" for their tire which is often too high. Apparently higher PSI does not necessarily mean lower rolling resistance. There are charts and formulas (formulae??) out there that purport to give the "ideal" PSI based on tire size and rider weight, but this is only a guide since it does not take into account your roads, riding style, and personal preference....use the "advanced search" on tire pressure for tons of postings on this topic. (the regular search here sucks but advanced search works well).

/end thread hijack
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