Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
Reload this Page >

change to 18t - much difference?

Notices
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

change to 18t - much difference?

Old 04-19-16, 07:50 AM
  #1  
Dr1Gonzo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
change to 18t - much difference?

I've got a 46/18 at the moment.
Edit: meant moving from 16t to 18t
It's perfect for the way down but on the way back up home, there is some very gradual incline and 2 steep sections. I can just manage it on my 46/18 but my left knee hurts a bit and it's slow going.
Wondering if swapping to an 18t would help or is there not going to be much difference?

Last edited by Dr1Gonzo; 04-19-16 at 09:51 AM.
Dr1Gonzo is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 07:55 AM
  #2  
oouellette
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Chi-Burbs IL
Posts: 388

Bikes: '86 Madison, '87 Tempo, '16 Steamroller, '18 Kilo WT

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
oouellette is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 07:57 AM
  #3  
ggpepper
Senior Member
 
ggpepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: ATX
Posts: 103

Bikes: Trek, Traitor, Marin, Nashbar

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Maybe you meant going to a 20t? If so, going up will be easier but going down won't be as much fun....if that's possible
ggpepper is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 08:08 AM
  #4  
ThermionicScott 
hungry
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Posts: 19,057

Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2308 Post(s)
Liked 265 Times in 200 Posts
Try standing when you climb.
__________________
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
Originally Posted by noglider
People in this forum are not typical.
RUSA #7498
ThermionicScott is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 09:26 AM
  #5  
Blylan
Wandering Around
 
Blylan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: San Jose, California
Posts: 94

Bikes: 1981 Katakura Silk Speedmaster, 2012 Fuji Feather, 2015 Bianchi Super Pista

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Does OP think 18 and 18t are two different things?
Blylan is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 09:50 AM
  #6  
Dr1Gonzo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Blylan View Post
Does OP think 18 and 18t are two different things?
oops. meant 16t to 18t
Dr1Gonzo is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 10:30 AM
  #7  
Co1Ev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 107
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A change of two teeth on the rear cog makes a massive difference - there are some hills I struggled with when first riding 48x16 in my local area but after popping an 18 on the back they were breeze. Just gotta get used to the higher cadences when coming down the hill.

Track cogs can be had for fairly cheap, pick up an inexpensive 18T cog to see if you like it. if you do, great. Ride the hell out of it and then replace it with a better quality cog further down the line. If not, try a different ratio then rinse and repeat.
Co1Ev is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 12:52 PM
  #8  
Dr1Gonzo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Co1Ev View Post
A change of two teeth on the rear cog makes a massive difference - there are some hills I struggled with when first riding 48x16 in my local area but after popping an 18 on the back they were breeze. Just gotta get used to the higher cadences when coming down the hill.

Track cogs can be had for fairly cheap, pick up an inexpensive 18T cog to see if you like it. if you do, great. Ride the hell out of it and then replace it with a better quality cog further down the line. If not, try a different ratio then rinse and repeat.
If I want on the freewheel / single speed side rather then the fixed side, is there a freewheel as part of the cog in these or can I use the existing one and just fit a new cog onto it?
Dr1Gonzo is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 01:26 PM
  #9  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 14,784

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 233 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6822 Post(s)
Liked 652 Times in 410 Posts
Freewheels and cogs are two different things.

You can use two freewheels, one on each side of the wheel and coast all the time. Or you can use two cogs, one on each side of the wheel and ride fixed all the time.

Or you can use a freewheel on one side and fixed-gear cog on the other, any number of teeth you want, in any combination. The threads for freewheels and cogs are the same. there is no fixed/freewheel side. The wheel doesn't care.

The only thing to watch out for is that some freewheels can't be removed once they are installed without diassembly. You have to punch out a part of the freewheel, disassemble it and remove it with a vice and pliers.
TimothyH is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 01:39 PM
  #10  
seau grateau
Senior Member
 
seau grateau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: PHL
Posts: 9,725

Bikes: Litespeed, IRO

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1227 Post(s)
Liked 153 Times in 87 Posts
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Or you can use a freewheel on one side and fixed-gear cog on the other, any number of teeth you want, in any combination. The threads for freewheels and cogs are the same. there is no fixed/freewheel side. The wheel doesn't care.
Not necessarily. On many hubs, one side lacks the reverse-threaded section needed to use a lockring for a fixed cog.
seau grateau is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 01:40 PM
  #11  
Dr1Gonzo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Freewheels and cogs are two different things.

You can use two freewheels, one on each side of the wheel and coast all the time. Or you can use two cogs, one on each side of the wheel and ride fixed all the time.

Or you can use a freewheel on one side and fixed-gear cog on the other, any number of teeth you want, in any combination. The threads for freewheels and cogs are the same. there is no fixed/freewheel side. The wheel doesn't care.

The only thing to watch out for is that some freewheels can't be removed once they are installed without diassembly. You have to punch out a part of the freewheel, disassemble it and remove it with a vice and pliers.
At the moment, I have a flip flop hub on a Fuji feather.
So if I get a 18T it can go on either side. I suppose there is an existing freewheel mechanism that I can just unscrew the existing cog from?
Dr1Gonzo is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 02:56 PM
  #12  
Blylan
Wandering Around
 
Blylan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: San Jose, California
Posts: 94

Bikes: 1981 Katakura Silk Speedmaster, 2012 Fuji Feather, 2015 Bianchi Super Pista

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Dr1Gonzo View Post
At the moment, I have a flip flop hub on a Fuji feather.
So if I get a 18T it can go on either side. I suppose there is an existing freewheel mechanism that I can just unscrew the existing cog from?
I have a 2012 Feather and the stock freewheel attached requires a bit of dismantling to remove it, for the Fixed Cog you just need a lock ring tool and a chain whip.
Blylan is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 04:25 PM
  #13  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 14,784

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 233 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6822 Post(s)
Liked 652 Times in 410 Posts
Originally Posted by Dr1Gonzo View Post
At the moment, I have a flip flop hub on a Fuji feather.
So if I get a 18T it can go on either side. I suppose there is an existing freewheel mechanism that I can just unscrew the existing cog from?
First of all, and again, freewheels and cogs are two different things. You can't unscrew a cog from a freewheel mechanism - freewheels and cogs are completely different things. You replace a freewheel with a cog and lock ring, and vice versa. If your bike can coast then you have a freewheel. If your bike can't coast (AKA fixed gear) then you have a cog with lockring.

Second, as @seau grateau pointed out, some wheels don't accept a freewheel on both sides. You have to check your wheel, make sure your wheel has the capability to accept a lock ring on both sides. If you see two sets of threads on both sides then you can put freewheels or cog/lockring on both sides. If one side has only one set of threads then you can only put a cog/lockring on one side and the other has to be a freewheel.

In your case, if you can see two sets of threads on the side that currently has nothing on it then you can just buy a cog and lockring. You will need tools (lock ring tool and possibly chain whip) to install it and grease to lubricate the threads. If you don't understand all this or if you don't have and can't buy the tools then it is probably best to go to a shop. Five minutes in the local shop is going to answer all your questions.
TimothyH is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 05:51 PM
  #14  
McBTC
Senior Member
 
McBTC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,770

Bikes: 2015 22 Speed

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1497 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
There is ~10% change in gear inches when you increase the rear cog by 2 teeth...
McBTC is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 05:57 PM
  #15  
Dr1Gonzo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
First of all, and again, freewheels and cogs are two different things. You can't unscrew a cog from a freewheel mechanism - freewheels and cogs are completely different things. You replace a freewheel with a cog and lock ring, and vice versa. If your bike can coast then you have a freewheel. If your bike can't coast (AKA fixed gear) then you have a cog with lockring.
My terminology is all messed up then. On a MTB, what do you call the 6 or 7 rings around the back freewheel/cassette - not cogs?
How do I change the size of the ring on the freewheel side?

Second, as @seau grateau pointed out, some wheels don't accept a freewheel on both sides. You have to check your wheel, make sure your wheel has the capability to accept a lock ring on both sides. If you see two sets of threads on both sides then you can put freewheels or cog/lockring on both sides. If one side has only one set of threads then you can only put a cog/lockring on one side and the other has to be a freewheel.

In your case, if you can see two sets of threads on the side that currently has nothing on it then you can just buy a cog and lockring. You will need tools (lock ring tool and possibly chain whip) to install it and grease to lubricate the threads. If you don't understand all this or if you don't have and can't buy the tools then it is probably best to go to a shop. Five minutes in the local shop is going to answer all your questions.
Pics of the fixed side and pics of the freewheel side.
I don`t really mind either but since freewheel is probably easier downhill then I should probably put the 18T on the fixed side. How many extra chain links would be likely?

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
IMG_20160419_194828816.jpg (71.9 KB, 20 views)
File Type: jpg
IMG_20160419_194815910.jpg (78.1 KB, 21 views)

Last edited by Dr1Gonzo; 04-19-16 at 06:10 PM.
Dr1Gonzo is offline  
Old 04-19-16, 10:45 PM
  #16  
Flatulentfox
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 334
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
On a modern mtb, you have a free hub with a cassette. The ratcheting mechanism is built into the hub. On a flip flop hub like you have, the ratxheting mechanism is built into the removable freewheel. The hub is just a solid chunk of aluminum. You change the entire free wheel to change gears.

Do your self a favor a visit sheldon brown. That should clear most of this up.
Flatulentfox is offline  
Old 04-20-16, 12:56 AM
  #17  
Cute Boy Horse
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 623
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 220 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Dr1Gonzo View Post
My terminology is all messed up then. On a MTB, what do you call the 6 or 7 rings around the back freewheel/cassette - not cogs?
You just answered your own question, as a whole unit they are either a freewheel or a cassette. Each individual toothed wheel is called a sprocket.

When you are talking about non-geared bikes you talk of freewheels, which are lone sprockets that can coast because they have a freewheel type clutch mechanism built in, or you talk of cogs, which are lone sprockets that can't coast.

When you talk about (dérailleur) geared bikes, then a freewheel is the same but with more sprockets attached. Cassettes are multiple sprockets with no clutch, because it's inside the hub instead.

Last edited by Cute Boy Horse; 04-20-16 at 01:00 AM.
Cute Boy Horse is offline  
Old 04-20-16, 04:37 AM
  #18  
Dr1Gonzo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
And no need for a longer chain with a 18t? ie moving from 46/16 to 46/18.
Dr1Gonzo is offline  
Old 04-20-16, 08:53 AM
  #19  
SquidPuppet
Calamari Marionette Ph.D
 
SquidPuppet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Coeur d' Alene
Posts: 7,883

Bikes: 3 Chinese Gas Pipe Nerdcycles and 2 Chicago Electroforged Boat Anchors

Mentioned: 74 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2349 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Dr1Gonzo View Post
And no need for a longer chain with a 18t? ie moving from 46/16 to 46/18.
Each tooth increased or decreased will force you to move your axle 1/8 inch. So swapping from 16 to 18 and vice versa will require you to re position the wheel 1/4 inch (6.35mm) forward or rearward in the dropouts.

You'll need to look at your current set up to see if that will work, based on where your axle sits now. Also check tire/seat tube clearance.

Last edited by SquidPuppet; 04-20-16 at 08:56 AM.
SquidPuppet is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
BicycleBicycle
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
17
11-08-18 08:30 PM
simplybao
General Cycling Discussion
6
06-15-15 12:40 PM
RacerOne
Road Cycling
64
01-19-13 03:50 PM
Virus610
Road Cycling
66
11-12-11 09:43 AM
stapfam
Fifty Plus (50+)
6
08-24-11 12:57 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.