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Very interested in this whole FFSG thing...

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

Very interested in this whole FFSG thing...

Old 05-15-08, 01:21 AM
  #1  
Jacobi
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Very interested in this whole FFSG thing...

I just started reading about this whole SSFG thing and it has caught my attention, mainly as a means to train for road cycling. Of course, after reading everything on here, I can't decide between the following bikes:

Surly Steam Roller Complete

IRO Mark V/Angus
-I like the Mark V more but I'm not sure if the steel is of good quality

Kona Paddywagon

Last but not least the Bareknuckle, but where are these things sold at?


Okay, now that we've covered that, is there any chance of another group buy going on? I wish I could have gotten in on the IRO one, but if another one is around or soon to be, that'd be nice!

Thanks,
-Barry-
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Old 05-15-08, 01:44 AM
  #2  
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I don't know enough about this stuff to really tell you but I just noticed that you wrote "FFSG" in your title, like, ****ing Fixed Single Gear or something.
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Old 05-15-08, 02:10 AM
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Haha, oh well, maybe it will get more attention that way!
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Old 05-15-08, 05:30 AM
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If you fall in love with it you'll probably wish you had have just done a custom build to begin with, but if you don't, then you won't end up out of pocket as much with an 'off the shelf' bike. All the bikes you mentioned are decent options though.
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Old 05-15-08, 05:57 AM
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of those you listed, i'd recommend the paddywagon.
while it's not my favorite, you mentioned you're going to be using it primarily as a training bike; the dual water cage bosses are probably a good idea. the mark v and steamroller only have one, the bareknuckle has 0.
besides that, it's the most like a road bike (geometry) of the ones you listed, and is actually made of pretty good tubing; the same dedacciai com tubing as (i believe) the bareknuckle, which is pretty good stuff.
i've always felt the steamroller was pretty mediocre, and the bareknuckle (while a fantastic frameset) isn't really what you're looking for. the mark v is a good bike too, but probably not the best for your needs.

go with the paddywagon.

Last edited by sp00ki; 05-15-08 at 06:03 AM.
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Old 05-15-08, 06:01 AM
  #6  
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Why do those bikes have such stupid names?
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Old 05-15-08, 07:10 AM
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why do you have such a stupid name, stupid?
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Old 05-15-08, 07:28 AM
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because all the stupid mountian names where already taken
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Old 05-15-08, 09:09 AM
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I built up a fixed for the same reason. I needed a way to increase my cadence and I thoght a fixed would do it.

I tell ya, I haven't touched the road bike since the first day the fixed was ridable. It is so much fun. Going for a long road ride this sat, we'll see if it actually helps. Probably too soon to tell.
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Old 05-15-08, 09:17 AM
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I gotta say that I love my Steamroller, but the argument for the water bottle bosses on the Paddywagon is a good one. They're also pretty reasonably priced, easy to find, and as far as I've seen they basically look like they're built like a steamroller but with extra mounting points for fenders (training in the rain) and racks (good for commuting, and commuting = base miles baby). I've also never really known the difference between 4130 and Dedacci (no idea how to spell that) tubing so I'm afraid I can't factor that one in. Lemond Fremont might be another good one to check out.
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Old 05-15-08, 09:27 AM
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To echo Spooki a little bit, a track bike might not be so hot for road training. Have you considered the Scattante Americano from performance?

I'm not sure if it comes with a flip flop hub, but for what it's going for right now you could pick up a new fixed rear wheel and still be happy with it, or run it as a suicide hub with some loctite, again assuming you won't be using it for fixxxi trixxx.

It looks like you could get it for about $300 now with a 20% off coupon.
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Old 05-15-08, 10:17 AM
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Thanks for the quick responses everyone!

I believe that one water bottle would be enough since I could throw a 24oz. in there.

Keep the thoughts coming!
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Old 05-15-08, 10:42 AM
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Fixie training is good for road riders. It helps you notice all of the coasting you are doing on the road bike.
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Old 05-15-08, 10:48 AM
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i think it helps on hills more than anything. with climbs because you get used to (both physically and psychologically) pushing through a hill in the saddle instead of downshifting first, and on descents: your cadence will get really fast in a short amount of time.
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Old 05-15-08, 11:00 AM
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What about a Bianchi Fremont? Single speed road bike. $599 free shipping w/link below.

They only have the larger sizes in, but they seem to run a little small since they do sell a 63.
http://www.benscycle.net/index.php?m...&cPath=188_451
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Old 05-15-08, 11:40 AM
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I like my Jamis Sputnik, and it definitely has road geometry.
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Old 05-15-08, 12:26 PM
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Bianchi San Jose
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Old 05-15-08, 03:29 PM
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Surly markets very well thought out and well put together frames.

If one likes the handling of a Surly, it makes a rideable starting point for learning about fixed gear bikes and provides a good foundation for future upgrades.

I also like the Bianchi Pista, and I prefer the Pista's handling for riding on the street in traffic.

Somebody put a lot of thought into the Pista frame and fork.

I'd ride those two bikes and pick the one that had the handling I preferred.
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Old 05-15-08, 04:28 PM
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I thought about it more, and you should get a bike that has the closest geometry to your road bike. If you are using it to train, then it just makes sense.
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Old 05-15-08, 04:33 PM
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Found this bike over in the Classic and Vintage forum. It's a 1935 Raleigh that got converted to fixed gear back in the 50's. Probably to be used as a winter trainer. It was a Raleigh Record Ace.



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Old 05-15-08, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by bbattle View Post
Found this bike over in the Classic and Vintage forum. It's a 1935 Raleigh that got converted to fixed gear back in the 50's. Probably to be used as a winter trainer. It was a Raleigh Record Ace.
Interesting bike.

Conversions are OK for those newbies just getting into fixed riding but a frame actually designed to be a fixed/SS is preferable and just more enjoyable to ride.

I have a vintage fixie conversion similar to this. It was fun at first but after riding my new modern road bike I'm really beginning to hate this one. It's heavy (23lbs) and rides terrible, probably like a Conestoga wagon. It's really Fred Flinstone's bike! Today I "graduated" by ordering a Scattante SSR frame and retiring this frame:


Last edited by smurfy; 05-15-08 at 06:37 PM.
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Old 05-15-08, 07:43 PM
  #22  
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I looked at a Paddy Wagon today and really liked it. It comes with good tires and it seemed well built, but what do I know?!
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