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So how easy is it to install a lock ring and cog?

Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

So how easy is it to install a lock ring and cog?

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Old 08-05-08, 08:21 AM
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Adam G.
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So how easy is it to install a lock ring and cog?

I have a flipfop hub and want to put a fixed on. I know I need a chain wipe, any other tool needed? Also do I need to line the threads with some kind of lube? Beginner here, sorry for the questions that I know have been posted a 1000000x's!
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Old 08-05-08, 08:23 AM
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sp00ki
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1) chain whip
2) some people use loctite, some use grease; def use something, but not too much.
3) do this:
- line the threads with grease (or loctite)-- remember, not too much at all. the threads will be flush, so even a tiny bit will spread through.
- put the cog on nice and snug
- put the ring on nice and snug
- re-tighten the cog, simultaneously tigtening the lockring
- tighten the **** out of the lock ring; i've seen people tap the end of the lockring wrench with a mallot to get a bit more force, but that might be overkill.

-presto-

Last edited by sp00ki; 08-05-08 at 08:29 AM.
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Old 08-05-08, 08:33 AM
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I feel that a chain whip can be replaced instead by the rotofix method. A lockring tool though does seem completely necessary.
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Old 08-05-08, 08:35 AM
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andrewro
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See also the Dura Ace / Chain whip thread a few lines down..
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Old 08-05-08, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by sp00ki View Post
1) chain whip
2) some people use loctite, some use grease; def use something, but not too much.
3) do this:
- line the threads with grease (or loctite)-- remember, not too much at all. the threads will be flush, so even a tiny bit will spread through.
- put the cog on nice and snug
- put the ring on nice and snug
- re-tighten the cog, simultaneously tigtening the lockring
- tighten the **** out of the lock ring; i've seen people tap the end of the lockring wrench with a mallot to get a bit more force, but that might be overkill.

-presto-

Why thank you!
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Old 08-05-08, 08:40 AM
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sp00ki
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btw, i didn't mention the lockring wrench until the last line; should've been more clear: you need one.
hozan makes a very affordable one that works perfectly.

http://www.hozan.co.jp/cycle_e/catal...edal/C-205.htm
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Old 08-05-08, 08:42 AM
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Originally Posted by sp00ki View Post
- put the cog on nice and snug
via a chain whip or via the rotofix method

Originally Posted by sp00ki View Post
- put the ring on nice and snug
via a lockring tool / lockring spanner
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Old 08-05-08, 09:00 AM
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Adam G.
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I have some Triflow, is this sufficient enough for the lube part of it?
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Old 08-05-08, 09:05 AM
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not sure... you should probably re-start this thread in the mechanics forum. i've only ever used grease or loctite, but both have worked perfectly and lasted hundreds (if not thousands) of miles of riding and skidding. if you don't have a tub (or at least a tube) of grease, you should buy some.
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Old 08-05-08, 09:26 AM
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Originally Posted by sp00ki View Post
not sure... you should probably re-start this thread in the mechanics forum. i've only ever used grease or loctite, but both have worked perfectly and lasted hundreds (if not thousands) of miles of riding and skidding. if you don't have a tub (or at least a tube) of grease, you should buy some.

You know I will take your word and go with the loctite.
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Old 08-05-08, 09:30 AM
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i'm a fan of this stuff:
http://www.philwood.com/Phil%20Grease.htm
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Old 08-05-08, 10:03 AM
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triflow can be used as lube for the chain..it is what i use for my chain. as for grease, i use phil wood grease. and to take off/put on the lockring, i use a screwdriver and hammer to tap it. and some vise grips to take off the cog/put it on.
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Old 08-05-08, 10:19 AM
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1. Triflow is WAY to thin and after a month or two, it is questionable how much it will keep things from seizing. Great for chains, bad for this.

2. I am very much in the camp that believes you should NOT USE LOCTITE for this application. Would you like to have the ability to change out your cog somewhere down the road? Sure you do. Would you like to be able to do that without having to apply levels of force that will probably hurt you or some part of your bike? Sounds like a good idea! Then use grease, not loctite. Loctite is for stuff you really don't want to move again. You definately don't want the cogs to move on you while you are riding, but this is accomplished by proper installation, not loctite.
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Old 08-05-08, 11:02 AM
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you can change a loctite cog/lockring. i've done so a few times, just takes more force than one with grease-- and not enough to hurt anything. we're not talking j-b weld here, it's loctite.
i'd only avoid loctite if you change your cogs often, but the majority of street riders don't-- loctite is fine if you're swapping a cog once a year or something.
that said, i used grease on the last two cogs i installed. i probably won't use loctite in the future, but not because there's anything wrong with it, but rather because i only have grease at home which works.

Last edited by sp00ki; 08-05-08 at 11:06 AM.
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Old 08-05-08, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Adam G. View Post
I have a flipfop hub and want to put a fixed on. I know I need a chain wipe, any other tool needed? Also do I need to line the threads with some kind of lube? Beginner here, sorry for the questions that I know have been posted a 1000000x's!
Chain wipe, Ha!

Its easy, (I think that people have said this already) 1. chain whip (or wipe, whatever, also sometimes called a "free-wheel wrench") ( avg $19) 2. Lockring wrench ($20 - $25).

In every case, aside from most of what has been said so far, be sure that the cog and lockring go on the threads nice and easy. I don' think you need locktite or lube or any of that. That sounds like a mess wating to happen. Just know that if the screwing on gets to tough, you know you've got it on squank.

Also, don't forget to buy these at your LBS. They will help you out and be there to show you how to use these things. They are, for the most part, just as cheap as online stores, plus you get the benefit of personal attention to your questions.
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Old 08-05-08, 12:58 PM
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Oh, come to think about it. Some grease might be good for that rear cog, if you keep your bike out in the elements. But this will be mostly for the sake of getting some clean threads. There is no reason to have "well lubed" hub threads.
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Old 08-05-08, 01:23 PM
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heh, i just put the cog and lockring on by hand. proceeded to mash up my driveway and finished tightening the lockring by hand. haven't had any problems. i did grease the threads.
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Old 08-05-08, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by soul05 View Post
and to take off/put on the lockring, i use a screwdriver and hammer to tap it. and some vise grips to take off the cog/put it on.
I wouldn't advise this, just use the proper tools.
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Old 08-05-08, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by sp00ki View Post
you can change a loctite cog/lockring. i've done so a few times, just takes more force than one with grease-- and not enough to hurt anything. we're not talking j-b weld here, it's loctite.
i'd only avoid loctite if you change your cogs often, but the majority of street riders don't-- loctite is fine if you're swapping a cog once a year or something.
that said, i used grease on the last two cogs i installed. i probably won't use loctite in the future, but not because there's anything wrong with it, but rather because i only have grease at home which works.
I maintain that if you are installing correctly, grease is preferable because it makes future maintanence easier, but something is certainly better than nothing. I agree, Loctite certainly isn't that bad (I assume we are talking blue loctite. Red loctite IS that bad), I just think grease is the way to go.
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