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Winter/Snow Tires?

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Winter/Snow Tires?

Old 03-07-13, 12:20 AM
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garciagomez23
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Winter/Snow Tires?

I ride a fixie for work (my job) and I am looking for some tires that get some traction on the snow/rain/slush etc. I live in Chicago. I usually use a mountain bike for when we get snow (Columbia MTB) but its on the heavy side to I take longer and more tired!

So im looking to invest in some studded tires? for a fixie. I did some research and found the

Panaracer PT's.......does anyone use this? or have other tires in mind. Not looking to get reallll thick tires but if I have to

Any advice would be appreciated please no smartazzes
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Old 03-07-13, 12:31 AM
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Your best bet would be to look at some cyclocross tires. I don't know or have any experience with any snow specific tires since I live in California, but I imagine a tire that works well in sandy conditions would work well in snow.
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Old 03-07-13, 06:15 AM
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My first piece of advice is do not take advice from people who don't know about snow tires, especially if their results are coming from their imagination. Unless they have a really good imagination, in which case you might be fine!

There is an entire subforum dedicated to winter biking, go there.

In the meantime, understand that your choice of words is confusing. You talk about a MTB and that you want snow tires for a fixie. Plenty of MTBs are fixies. In fact, I think a 26er fixed gear is the best all-around winter bike setup for a number of reasons which I will not go into here. And you have plenty of studded options.

It sounds like you want a 700c studded tire. The next thing you need to know is the clearance on your "fixie" - will 32cm tires fit? how about 35?

If you are starting your search for studded snow tires with the Panaracer PT I am afraid this is going to be a long journey.
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Old 03-07-13, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Bat56 View Post
My first piece of advice is do not take advice from people who don't know about snow tires, especially if their results are coming from their imagination. Unless they have a really good imagination, in which case you might be fine!

There is an entire subforum dedicated to winter biking, go there.

In the meantime, understand that your choice of words is confusing. You talk about a MTB and that you want snow tires for a fixie. Plenty of MTBs are fixies. In fact, I think a 26er fixed gear is the best all-around winter bike setup for a number of reasons which I will not go into here. And you have plenty of studded options.

It sounds like you want a 700c studded tire. The next thing you need to know is the clearance on your "fixie" - will 32cm tires fit? how about 35?

If you are starting your search for studded snow tires with the Panaracer PT I am afraid this is going to be a long journey.
Ooo I see. I guess I wrote the question in my own words and only I undsrstand it! sorry guys, thanks for the tips.

My..."fixie".... is a Se Draft Lite. and im sure maybe 32c fit.
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Old 03-07-13, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by garciagomez23 View Post
... im sure maybe 32c fit.
sure maybe LOLZ
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Old 03-07-13, 04:12 PM
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32 might fit, 28 will fit. For what it's worth, I ride fixed (don't call it a ****ing fixie around here.) all year. Last year I did it on 700x28 Kenda Kwik Rollers and went down twice on ice. This year I did it on 700x23 Continental Gator Hardshells and haven't gone down yet. Unless you're actually on ice, which is unlikely because Chicago and the suburbs I've been through ( Oak Park, Evanston, Skokie, Lincolnwood, Morton Grove, Park Ridge, Wilmette, Kenilworth, Winnetka, Glencoe, Highland Park, and Northbrook) keep the roads pretty well salted, you don't need studs. A mountain tire will float over the surface somewhat, as will a bigger CX tire. However, when dealing with slush and snow on roads, I find that thin tires with a lot of pressure cut through all of it and you'll be on the road. Just my $0.02.
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Old 03-07-13, 07:30 PM
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I ride fixed w/ 700x30 Kenda Kwik (CX tires) at the moment. Used to have the kwik rollers and liked them as well. I'm switching to Schwalbe Durano Pluses 700x32 for the spring.

Winter is going to be over in no time.... why are you asking about winter tires? Just ride what you got and figure it out by next winter.
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Old 03-08-13, 08:35 AM
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(don't call it a ****ing fixie around here.)

calm down buddy
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Old 03-08-13, 08:36 AM
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Originally Posted by john4789 View Post
I ride fixed w/ 700x30 Kenda Kwik (CX tires) at the moment. Used to have the kwik rollers and liked them as well. I'm switching to Schwalbe Durano Pluses 700x32 for the spring.

Winter is going to be over in no time.... why are you asking about winter tires? Just ride what you got and figure it out by next winter.

yup thats the new plan.
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Old 03-08-13, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by jimmytango View Post
32 might fit, 28 will fit. For what it's worth, I ride fixed (don't call it a ****ing fixie around here.) all year. Last year I did it on 700x28 Kenda Kwik Rollers and went down twice on ice. This year I did it on 700x23 Continental Gator Hardshells and haven't gone down yet. Unless you're actually on ice, which is unlikely because Chicago and the suburbs I've been through ( Oak Park, Evanston, Skokie, Lincolnwood, Morton Grove, Park Ridge, Wilmette, Kenilworth, Winnetka, Glencoe, Highland Park, and Northbrook) keep the roads pretty well salted, you don't need studs. A mountain tire will float over the surface somewhat, as will a bigger CX tire. However, when dealing with slush and snow on roads, I find that thin tires with a lot of pressure cut through all of it and you'll be on the road. Just my $0.02.

if your talking about main roads yes they are. but like.stated I do food delivery so smaller streets are not.touched for.atleast a.day or two
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Old 03-08-13, 09:04 AM
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Originally Posted by TheRealFaux View Post
Your best bet would be to look at some cyclocross tires. I don't know or have any experience with any snow specific tires since I live in California, but I imagine a tire that works well in sandy conditions would work well in snow.
Studded tires are 100x better than CX tires in snow/ice. Once you ride studded tires in crappy conditions you will never go back.
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Old 03-08-13, 09:14 AM
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I have run studs (Nokian Hakka 240)on my SS/fixed but for the most part they stay off, my SS is a monstercross bike so it can take fat tires. I ride my 26" touring bike with fat studs when the weather calls for it.

Changing bikes is cool with me and studs on the 26er make me a stronger rider.
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Old 03-08-13, 12:06 PM
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Originally Posted by garciagomez23 View Post
(don't call it a ****ing fixie around here.)

calm down buddy
I am calm. That's just how I speak. But calling it a fixie can get you hazed badly. I've seen it happen.

Originally Posted by garciagomez23 View Post
if your talking about main roads yes they are. but like.stated I do food delivery so smaller streets are not.touched for.atleast a.day or two
Ah. Didn't catch that part.
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Old 03-08-13, 09:29 PM
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For your sweet fixie, I would recommend a studded tire in the front and a 'cross tire in the back. One of my bikes is set up that way and it rolls through or over pretty much anything and can speed along.

In my experience, one studded tire is all you need. If you're going through a lot of snow and need some extra traction for the back, then spring for the knobby cx tire (i.e. Maxxis Mudwrestler). If you don't think you'll need a ton of traction, then the Panaracers will be just fine (and will also be useful when the snow and ice is gone).
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Old 03-09-13, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by jimmytango View Post
I am calm.
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Old 03-09-13, 11:50 AM
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When I was messin around I rode a mtb with a fixed drive and rocked studded tyres... the ride quality was better and never had a stability issue and it made me one of the fastest guys on the street when the weather turned sideways.

Would stash my regular ride downtown so if the weather warranted, I could ride light and then store the mtb.
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Old 03-09-13, 08:04 PM
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Originally Posted by garciagomez23 View Post
I ride a fixie for work (my job) and I am looking for some tires that get some traction on the snow/rain/slush etc. I live in Chicago. I usually use a mountain bike for when we get snow (Columbia MTB) but its on the heavy side to I take longer and more tired!

So im looking to invest in some studded tires? for a fixie. I did some research and found the

Panaracer PT's.......does anyone use this? or have other tires in mind. Not looking to get reallll thick tires but if I have to

Any advice would be appreciated please no smartazzes
Schwalbe CX Pro 700x30 is propably the best non-studded tire for winter riding. It's a small narrow tire which will fit in many fixie frames with tight clearence. This tire has very good traction in snow, slush and even ice when run at low pressure... Most studded tires are a little bit wider so they may not fit your fixie frame.
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Old 03-09-13, 11:13 PM
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Originally Posted by SnowJob View Post
For your sweet fixie, I would recommend a studded tire in the front and a 'cross tire in the back. One of my bikes is set up that way and it rolls through or over pretty much anything and can speed along.

In my experience, one studded tire is all you need. If you're going through a lot of snow and need some extra traction for the back, then spring for the knobby cx tire (i.e. Maxxis Mudwrestler). If you don't think you'll need a ton of traction, then the Panaracers will be just fine (and will also be useful when the snow and ice is gone).
yeah I thought about just putting the studded tire in the back. Last week when I worked I couldn't spin for shi.....it was kind of frustrating so I sucked it up but I guess im looking for options for next year since it looks like snow is done here in Chicago.
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Old 03-09-13, 11:52 PM
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I tend to use a tire that works in all conditions and will sit and keep a steady cadence where it's slick.

Right now have a 700x23c bontrager RXL All Weather Hardcase on the front and a 700x23/25 Special Ed Roubaix Armadillo Elite on the rear, though will be on 700x25 Continental Grand Prix 4 Seasons sometime next week.
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Old 03-11-13, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by SnowJob View Post
For your sweet fixie, I would recommend a studded tire in the front and a 'cross tire in the back. One of my bikes is set up that way and it rolls through or over pretty much anything and can speed along.

In my experience, one studded tire is all you need. If you're going through a lot of snow and need some extra traction for the back, then spring for the knobby cx tire (i.e. Maxxis Mudwrestler). If you don't think you'll need a ton of traction, then the Panaracers will be just fine (and will also be useful when the snow and ice is gone).
I have the exact opposite experience. Rear tire cannot navigate over rutted ice while front can, resulting in back end basically shooting/launching out from under you resulting in yellow/green grapefruit-sized bruises and time off from riding. Like putting snow tires on the front of a RWD car and worn out all-seasons in the back. If it is out of your budget for two, go with a front, otherwise run both. Less time on the ground or busted up at home is worth it IMHO.
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Old 03-12-13, 07:23 AM
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Mark it eight dude.
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