Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
Reload this Page >

New Guy Old Frame

Notices
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear "I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five. Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer? We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!"-- Henri Desgrange (31 January 1865 - 16 August 1940)

New Guy Old Frame

Old 02-13-15, 07:42 PM
  #1  
TwistyMcFisty
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
TwistyMcFisty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
New Guy Old Frame

What's up guys...
Been thinking about putting together a fixed gear for a while, and just acquired this old Lambert frame.
The crank turns smooth, frame and "death fork" seem good and straight as well.
Not sure of the size but through research of limited info on these bikes I think it's around 57cm or so??
Wondering if this would be too small for my 6'4" ass...?? (never had a road bike before)
Was hoping I could just throw some wheels and a chain on it and ride.
The frame is ridiculously light...seems like a good donor
What'cha think??

TwistyMcFisty is offline  
Old 02-13-15, 07:54 PM
  #2  
TwistyMcFisty
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
TwistyMcFisty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts


TwistyMcFisty is offline  
Old 02-13-15, 08:07 PM
  #3  
cDiff Notorious
Senior Member
 
cDiff Notorious's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 273

Bikes: Wabi Classic, Schwinn Madison

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
It doesn't look like a 57cm it looks more like a 50cm or smaller.
cDiff Notorious is offline  
Old 02-13-15, 09:33 PM
  #4  
Justsomedude
Senior Member
 
Justsomedude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Nashville
Posts: 154

Bikes: SE Lager Fixed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It looks small.
You could do the math and prop up the frame to the height it would be with wheels on it and check the standover height.
Or just get to a shop and see if they can put wheels on it to see.
This is a 26" Schwinn which would likely be perfect for your height
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Ironside.jpg (104.4 KB, 33 views)
Justsomedude is offline  
Old 02-14-15, 04:36 AM
  #5  
seau grateau
Senior Member
 
seau grateau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: PHL
Posts: 9,878

Bikes: Litespeed Catalyst, IRO Rob Roy, All City Big Block

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1301 Post(s)
Liked 270 Times in 139 Posts
Definitely not looking like 57 territory. If you're standing 6'4" I would say expect it to be too small.
seau grateau is offline  
Old 02-14-15, 04:39 AM
  #6  
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Posts: 4,229

Bikes: Hillbrick, Malvern Star Oppy S2, Europa (R.I.P.)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 370 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by seau grateau View Post
Definitely not looking like 57 territory. If you're standing 6'4" I would say expect it to be too small.
Masterful understatement.
Pity, it looks like a nice frame but if it doesn't fit, it doesn't fit and you won't enjoy riding it.
europa is offline  
Old 02-14-15, 06:48 AM
  #7  
Steev
Senior Member
 
Steev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Backwoods of Ontario
Posts: 2,152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Why are you guessing the size of the frame you have in your possession? Measure it.
Steev is offline  
Old 02-24-15, 11:46 PM
  #8  
Surly2698
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Denver Colorado
Posts: 97

Bikes: Surly steam roller, bear knukle,big block, fbm sword, litespeed swobo sanches

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Be careful if it has the original death fork
Do some research and get a new old fork for it
Good luck
Surly2698 is offline  
Old 02-25-15, 11:57 AM
  #9  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 21,751

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 126 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2259 Post(s)
Liked 656 Times in 442 Posts
The frame looks to be ~52cm center to center; likely far too small for a 6' 4" rider. Too bad, because the frame is the best thing about those bikes. It's astonishingly light weight, seamless chrome-moly tubing. The components tend to be odd: the crank extractor threads may be non-standard (later production used standard 22mm thread; the first runs used proprietary 7/8" x 24tpi thread). Chainrings use the formerly quite popular 50.4mm bolt circle to mount the outer ring. Early production also used an untapered spindle, which meant the arms didn't stay tight without frequent re-torquing. The pedals were innovative, with a one-piece cast body and roller bearings rather than balls for better load handling. But they had an unfortunate tendency to lose their dustcaps, and subsequently the retaining bolt, thereby spilling the needle bearings on the road. Lambert derailleurs are best unmentioned, but you don't seem to have them anyway. Thee hubs were one of the first sealed bearing hubs on the market and seem to hold up rather well. The bottom bracket also has sealed bearings, with the cartridges pressed directly into an unthreaded shell. These were held by circclips on the axle, the retaining grooves for which acted as stress risers leading to axle failure. The shell can be reamed and tapped for Italian thread, if needed.

The fork is definitely the so-called "death fork." There were several iterations of this design, and although some are thought to be more reliable than others, all were subject to recall:



It's an interesting bike, and they ride well but if it doesn't fit you that's a fundamental problem. Be prepared to have to work around the issues of the proprietary components, which can get expensive if/when they fail.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 02-25-15, 12:25 PM
  #10  
79pmooney
A Roadie Forever
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 8,677

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 100 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2408 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 844 Times in 571 Posts
Is the underside of that fork a smooth casting or can you see the threaded plug for the steerer (fig 3 in JohnD's post). If it is smooth, DON'T RIDE IT! Those forks have a stress riser at the bottom of the press-fit steerer. Between the headset cone and the steerer, there is no way short of X-ray to see if a crack has started across the bottom of that plug. When mine failed, you could see that the crack was about 1/3 of the way into it long enough for the aluminum to darken before the rest failed. (And when it failed, it went with no warning on an easy bunny hop of a pavement break I jumped every ride).

Except the paint and headtube decal, your bike looks exactly like mine. Same bars, stem and headset. I most certainly did not get the high end model with its fancier paint and decals. Way too cheap. But all the rest? Looks like the same bike. I loved the ride. I loved the fork. But I paid a high price I would wish on no one.

Ben
79pmooney is offline  
Old 02-26-15, 10:03 AM
  #11  
300# Gorilla
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: MN
Posts: 44

Bikes: Cross-Check, 73 Super Sport single speed, World Tourist

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Justsomedude View Post
It looks small.
You could do the math and prop up the frame to the height it would be with wheels on it and check the standover height.
Or just get to a shop and see if they can put wheels on it to see.
This is a 26" Schwinn which would likely be perfect for your height
Justsomedude is right. It has more to do with how long your legs are for the stand over, and the length of your upper body for the reach to the bars. But, generally if you are 6'4" you are looking at a 23" to 26" frame (measured from the center of the bottom bracket to the top of the seat tube). Weight is another consideration, if you are over 200lbs a skinny tired road bike is not going to be a comfortable ride, wider tires (35mm to 40mm) will be much more comfortable.
Your best bet is to find a large framed hybrid (Trek 700 of the top of my head, there are many other) to try and see how it works for you.
Good luck!
300# Gorilla is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
GeraldF
Utility Cycling
36
11-07-13 10:06 AM
breadbin
Mountain Biking
15
03-19-13 10:08 AM
alieboyj
Singlespeed & Fixed Gear
3
02-17-13 05:53 PM
Reynolds
Classic & Vintage
3
08-27-12 09:33 AM
DirtyHarry714
Classic & Vintage
5
02-18-12 01:45 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.