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What tent?

Old 01-10-17, 11:10 AM
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What tent?

I'm looking for a decent prices tent that won't weigh to much. I'm really kicking around buying the Alps mountaineering lynx one or lynx 2 because the realativly cheap and seem to be good qaulity. Would these work well for touring or are the other tents that are nicer without costing much more. I just want to know I have a good tent on tour
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Old 01-10-17, 12:32 PM
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A lot of the solo riders like the Eureka tents for cost to weight ratio. To improve your chances of getting good recommendations, please tell us about your trip plans. Are you going to travel where it might snow or get really windy? Do you need a tent for one person? Do you plan to wild/stealth/free camp?
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Old 01-10-17, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by niknak
A lot of the solo riders like the Eureka tents for cost to weight ratio.
Yes, I've had the Eureka Spitfire-1 for a couple years now. It has a little more headroom than the Lynx-1 and weighs almost a pound less. Not freestanding, but all that's needed are two tie-down points (rocks, etc.) for the two ends. I find that the solo model has more than enough room for me and my gear. But the Alps models look like good value options as well.
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Old 01-10-17, 01:17 PM
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Eureka Solitaire. Lighter than any tent I've seen under 200$, costs 75$, enough room for a 6'4 person and all their gear, plenty of ventilation for warm nights, rain fly for windy / rainy nights, only requires four stakes.

Packs up pretty small. I can fit mine in a revelate tangle or viscacha easily. I used it for a two week 1400 mile tour across the southern US, and its been handy for overnight trips to the lake.

I've had mine for a decade now and still use the stock parts without issue. I've seen other reviewers have issues with the poles but mine have been going strong this entire time.
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Old 01-10-17, 01:25 PM
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Originally Posted by sexy cyclist
Eureka Solitaire. Lighter than any tent I've seen under 200$, costs 75$, enough room for a 6'4 person and all their gear, plenty of ventilation for warm nights, rain fly for windy / rainy nights, only requires four stakes.

Packs up pretty small. I can fit mine in a revelate tangle or viscacha easily. I used it for a two week 1400 mile tour across the southern US, and its been handy for overnight trips to the lake.

I've had mine for a decade now and still use the stock parts without issue. I've seen other reviewers have issues with the poles but mine have been going strong this entire time.
Used my Solitaire for over a dozen years before I got the Spitfire. It does have enough room, but the height is very limited. Fine for sleeping, but not so good for sitting up and reading on a stormy day - or even for changing clothes comfortably. I did have one pole (smaller one) break on a backpacking trip and replaced it with an aluminum one (Solitaire has fiberglass poles). Breakage seems more common on recent purchases based on reviews
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Old 01-10-17, 01:41 PM
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Going Where , when?

Freestanding tents with separate rain Flys are a challenge to put up in a high wind.

+1 get 6061-T6 aluminum poles ... leave the Fiberglass poles for Car Camping.
(when they break You can always sleep in the Car)




'/,
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Old 01-10-17, 01:44 PM
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Alps gear is a pretty good value.

Big Agnes makes some extremely light tents. I've been using a Big Agnes Emerald Mountain tent for 10 years now. It has a couple holes in the screen and some zipper rash, but it's light and still keeps me dry.
They have excellent customer service, too. I wrote them about ordering some replacement aluminum pole sections; a couple of mine got bent after a fool fell on my tent. Big Agnes sent me three pole sections for free!

I search the internet vendors (like Campmor, Sierra Trading Post, etc) for closeout deals.
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Old 01-10-17, 01:52 PM
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I have a Eureka Apex 2, originally purchased for backpacking. It has been a great tent for the past 15 years or so, it was $99 back then. Not the lightest, nearly 5.5# in original stuff sack packaging and with homemade footprint, but plenty of room and I've never had an issue with it. I'd buy a Eureka again, and I see that line hasn't really gone up in price in 15 years.

I just bought a Big Agnes Tumble 2 at REIs garage sale for $99, brand new but apparently missing a piece (something that ties the two poles together where they cross, can replace with velcro). Same sized tent, but I didn't like the rainfly on the Eureka (they have changed it to something better since then) for the high wind environment I'm going to next. Haven't had a chance to try it out yet, but it is about 1.5# lighter than the Eureka. My only complaint is that it's not staying in factory stuff packaging, the poles elongate the stuff sack too much.
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Old 01-10-17, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by sexy cyclist
Eureka Solitaire. Lighter than any tent I've seen under 200$, costs 75$, enough room for a 6'4 person and all their gear, plenty of ventilation for warm nights, rain fly for windy / rainy nights, only requires four stakes.

Packs up pretty small. I can fit mine in a revelate tangle or viscacha easily. I used it for a two week 1400 mile tour across the southern US, and its been handy for overnight trips to the lake.

I've had mine for a decade now and still use the stock parts without issue. I've seen other reviewers have issues with the poles but mine have been going strong this entire time.
I'm impressed! My pole shattered on the 3rd night of use

Originally Posted by niknak
A lot of the solo riders like the Eureka tents for cost to weight ratio.
+1

Originally Posted by prathmann
Yes, I've had the Eureka Spitfire-1 for a couple years now. It has a little more headroom than the Lynx-1 and weighs almost a pound less. Not freestanding, but all that's needed are two tie-down points (rocks, etc.) for the two ends. I find that the solo model has more than enough room for me and my gear. But the Alps models look like good value options as well.
+1

I used the Eureka Spitfire 1 (also called the "Solo") for the last part of my 2016 tour and I'll take it again on the Southern Tier this year. Great tent. You can find it for ~$75 on sale otherwise they run ~$110.

As noted above, a lot of solo riders like the Eureka tents. The Spitfire 1 sleeps two comfortably if you're on the smaller size like my sister and I.
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Old 01-10-17, 02:41 PM
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You can find a plethora of recent tent recommendations by using the Advance Search function:


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Search the Touring forum for "Tent" in titles only.
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Old 01-10-17, 02:47 PM
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tents, buy cheap, buy two times. without any doubt Hilleberg Akto.
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Old 01-10-17, 02:50 PM
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Originally Posted by prathmann
Used my Solitaire for over a dozen years before I got the Spitfire. It does have enough room, but the height is very limited. Fine for sleeping, but not so good for sitting up and reading on a stormy day - or even for changing clothes comfortably. I did have one pole (smaller one) break on a backpacking trip and replaced it with an aluminum one (Solitaire has fiberglass poles). Breakage seems more common on recent purchases based on reviews
This is true, height is definitely limited. I prop myself up on an elbow to read at night, otherwise I pretty much use it solely for sleeping. I often pitch my tent next to something I can use to sit on if I want, if not I pack up and bike until I find a good place to take an early morning break. For example here I camped at some baseball fields. Ate dinner at some covered picnic tables, as well as breakfast the next morning:



If you're looking for a tent you can hang out in for hours after waking, the solitaire is most likely not for you. If you want something that will let you comfortably sleep and not weigh you down excessively during the day, its great.

I wonder if they changed something in the pole construction? If anyone wants I could post my decade old poles that are still going strong so they can compare them to theirs.

Last edited by sexy cyclist; 01-10-17 at 02:55 PM.
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Old 01-10-17, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by str
tents, buy cheap, buy two times. without any doubt Hilleberg Akto.
There is a difference between "cheap", and "inexpensive". Lots of inexpensive options that will last you for years, not everyone's budget calls for a $530 tent.
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Old 01-10-17, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk
There is a difference between "cheap", and "inexpensive". Lots of inexpensive options that will last you for years, not everyone's budget calls for a $530 tent.
v e n t i l a t i o n and material of the Hilleberg tents is not reached by any other brand.
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Old 01-10-17, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by str
v e n t i l a t i o n and material of the Hilleberg tents is not reached by any other brand.
I'm sure they are quality, just as I am sure if I looked I could find an even more quality option that cost even more, but that does not mean the likes of BA, Eureka, Mountain Hardware, Marmot, REI, etc are cheap and that if you buy one, you are immediately going to regret not having a Hillenberg.
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Old 01-10-17, 07:35 PM
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Originally Posted by sexy cyclist

Wallball is totally ol' skool!
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Old 01-10-17, 07:46 PM
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REI quarter dome 1 is on sale for $170, https://www.rei.com/product/862421/r...er-dome-1-tent

It gets good reviews and REI has a heck of a return policy. Nice size and good weight.
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Old 01-10-17, 08:08 PM
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Originally Posted by bikemig
REI has a heck of a return policy
Yup, this cannot be overstated. At the aforementioned last Garage Sale I attended, there was a decade old REI tent someone had managed to return being sold, and I quote (well, paraphrase) "bungee cord in poles is not strong enough anymore".

Lot of other otherwise new looking returned tents being sold off too, because they "aren't rainproof"
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Old 01-10-17, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by jefnvk
Yup, this cannot be overstated. At the aforementioned last Garage Sale I attended, there was a decade old REI tent someone had managed to return being sold, and I quote (well, paraphrase) "bungee cord in poles is not strong enough anymore".
Got a pair of hiking boots at one of those sales. The tag gave as the reason for the return "Were labeled as waterproof but when I got home I stood in the bathtub for 45 minutes and one started to leak." Marked down as a returned item from the original $170 to $0.88. Figure I'll try to get across any streams I encounter in half an hour or less.
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Old 01-10-17, 11:46 PM
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I plan on some stealth camping. Mostly weekend tours with short days and possibly a long cross country tour
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Old 01-10-17, 11:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Trentkln27
I plan on some stealth camping. Mostly weekend tours with short days and possibly a long cross country tour
Looking for a tent for sleeping or a tent for lounging in? That's something you'll want to decide before settling on a specific model.
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Old 01-11-17, 12:01 AM
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Originally Posted by sexy cyclist
Looking for a tent for sleeping or a tent for lounging in? That's something you'll want to decide before settling on a specific model.
I will do alot of lounging in my tent
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Old 01-11-17, 12:46 AM
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Then ignore my suggestion and good luck finding the right tent!
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Old 01-11-17, 01:01 AM
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Oh golly, I think that is a bit heavy although at a great price point. Perhaps look into the REI tents. They REi quarterdome is a little bit more than the lynx but substantially lighter. I have owned the quarterdome t3 for almost 8yrs now and love it dearly as a good balance of cost, weight, and price (especially when on sale). I has been on a few epic week trips, weekend trips, overnighters, and a summit without a problem. It has done well this whole time.

I have not found the alps mountaineering equipment the best equipment but I have only owned a few pieces. I do not know what you do w the rest of your time but the quarterdome T3 weighs less than the tent you mentioned and probably has only a little bit larger bulk. You could roomily go on other tours/ hikes w 2-3 people. Someone has also stated about the light weight of Big Agnes tents. I do not own one and have not used one so I cannot comment other than that on paper they look great.

cheers
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Old 01-11-17, 04:25 AM
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Alps Mountaineering are good value for money. Been using one for a few tours.
What ever tent you get, see if you can pitch the fly first, called external pitch. Some tents will allow this with a "footprint", a second floor if you like. This means if it's raining you can pitch the outer, then unpack and set up the inner in the dry. Same goes when packing up. Pull down the inner, pack up your stuff into your bags under shelter and at the last minute drop the outer. I carry ours in two bags, one for the inner and one for the outer.
Other things to look for: Decent ventilation on the fly, either large weather protected vents that can be propped open, or double ended zippers on the vestibule openings, so you can open the top to allow condensation out. If you aren't stealth camping, reflective ropes are good. Lots of internal pockets are good. Side vestibules are good, so you can easily get stuff out of your bags while laying in bed.
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