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Sleeping bag weight

Old 04-30-17, 11:39 AM
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BicycleCrazy
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Sleeping bag weight

What it the weight of sleeping bag you've used for touring?
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Old 04-30-17, 11:43 AM
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If weight is a concern, I'd take a long hard look at down quilts. I own and use a marmot atom which weighs 589 grams. I like my bag a lot but if buying a new bag, I'd buy a quilt.
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Old 04-30-17, 11:52 AM
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Mountain Hardware Fairview Long 40 degree - 920 grams without stuff sack. Had it for quite a few years now, I assume it is no longer made.

I also use a liner to keep the bag cleaner for those times when there are no showers at the campground. Adds a bit more weight.

If I expect it to get below freezing, I instead bring an REI Sub-Kilo Long - 860 grams. Lighter, but fits less roomy.
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Old 04-30-17, 11:59 AM
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I got a quilt from Enlightened Equipment which I love. 900 down fill, 30 degrees and I think it's 18 or 19 ounces (510 to 540 grams). I would recommend them if you can swing $250 or more.
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Old 04-30-17, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by BicycleCrazy View Post
What it the weight of sleeping bag you've used for touring?
I like your signature.
Last year in the heat of summer, A light (inexpensive) one. This spring a larger, warmer one about 3lbs.

Of interest, I brought along a light flannel blanket. I expect to use it on the crazy hot nights. But have found it nice on the cold nights to cover up my head as the wind blows through the tent.

Hope this helps,
-Snuts-
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Old 04-30-17, 01:17 PM
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It depends on the location, season and duration of the tour. The most versatile bag we have found is a light synthetic bag rated at 20F and weighing 2 pounds. It is not made anymore, but there are similar models on the market. It is the one we have used on all our long tours, including a ride across the U. S.

You will hear a lot of folks who use down bags due to their light weight and compressibility. The new synthetic bags rival down in warmth, weight and compressibility. Synthetic bags will keep you warm when they are wet, dry quickly, and are usually less expensive. I had my synthetic bag hanging over my bike to air out, and a dog came up and peed on it. The campground I was staying in had laundry facilities, so in a couple of hours I had a clean dry bag.

Best wishes on your ride!

This will give you a sense of scale. The blue compression sack with the tent is the same size as the yellow/green sack with the sleeping bag.


Use compression sacks for your tent and bags. The blue bag is the tent and rainfly, green bag is sleeping bag, Orange is Thermarest pad, and small gray bag is sil-nylon ground cloth, other gray bag is compressible pillow. All fit easily in Ortlieb Rack Pack.


The Rack Pack is waterproof and keeps gear dry. It is also a nice compact bundle. I prefer not to have a bunch of loose items strapped all on the racks.

Last edited by Doug64; 04-30-17 at 05:34 PM.
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Old 04-30-17, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
It depends on the location, season and duration of the tour. The most versatile bag we have found is a light synthetic bag rated at 20F and weighing 2 pounds. It is not made anymore, but there are similar models on the market. It is the one we have used on all our long tours, including a ride across the U. S.

You will hear a lot of folks who use down bags due to their light weight and compressibility. The new synthetic bags rival down in warmth, weight and compressibility. Synthetic bags will keep you warm when they are wet, dry quickly, and are usually less expensive. I had my synthetic bag hanging over my bike to air out, and a dog came up and peed on it. The campground I was staying in had laundry facilities, so in a couple of hours I had a clean dry bag.

Best wishes on your ride!

This will give you a sense of scale. The blue compression sack with the tent is the same size as the yellow/green sack with the sleeping bag.


Use compression sacks for your tent and bags. The blue bag is the tent and rainfly, green bag is sleping bag, Orange is Thermarest pad, and small gray bag is sil-nylon ground cloth, other gray bag is compressible pillow. All fit easily in Ortlieb Rack Pack.


The Rack Pack is waterproof and keeps gear dry. It is also a nice compact bundle. I prefer not to have a bunch of loose item strapped all on the racks.
Doug,
Thanks for the information...do you have the manufacturer name/models of the gear you have in the pic?
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Old 04-30-17, 02:12 PM
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I like down bags for warmth, weight, and compressibility. Down bags are always lighter & more compressible vs synthetic for the same warmth value. The downside is price. High-end down is expensive. I bought my in a closeout sale at REI. My twenty-five-degree bag is 825 grams (29 ounces).
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Old 04-30-17, 02:19 PM
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For stuff sack for my sleeping bag, I like the waterproof compression sack. Mine is made by Granite Gear, do a search for e-vent. I got it at Sierra Trading. I put my down vest into that compression sack too.
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Old 04-30-17, 03:21 PM
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I got a Mont Bell Down-Hugger 3 back when they first came out, about 8-10 years ago now. Weighs ~ 600g and compresses to not much. Below 5c I use a thermolite liner which adds 350g, and usually use thermals as well. I like the modular approach, it means you don't need 2 bags. The Mont Bell has lasted nicely, although it usually loses a feather every time I pack it up
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Old 04-30-17, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by BigAura View Post
I like down bags for warmth, weight, and compressibility. Down bags are always lighter & more compressible vs synthetic for the same warmth value. The downside is price. High-end down is expensive. I bought my in a closeout sale at REI. My twenty-five-degree bag is 825 grams (29 ounces).
You may be technically correct, but check out the latest generation of Primaloft sleeping bags. I don't think the weight difference is significant. I'll take a 2-3 oz. weight penalty for the advantages that synthetic bags and jackets offer over down.

Here again it is all a matter of preference. I've used down bags for years mountaineering, and still have a couple in the closet. Once good synthetics came out we made the switch.
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Old 04-30-17, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by BicycleCrazy View Post
Doug,
Thanks for the information...do you have the manufacturer name/models of the gear you have in the pic?
I can, but everything, except the compression sacks and the Thermarest pad, is at least 10 years old. The rack bag is made by Ortlieb.

Everything in the picture is at least 10 years old, and better and lighter gear is available.
The tent is the older model Sierra Designs Lightning 2 person, discontinued
The bag is a Marmot Pounder Plus, discontinued.
Compression Sacks are made by REI and Granite Gear.
The sleeping pad is a Thermarest Prolite4.

The same tent,thermarests, and sleeping bags get a lot of use besides bike touring.

Last edited by Doug64; 05-01-17 at 10:24 PM.
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Old 04-30-17, 04:10 PM
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Originally Posted by biggus duckus View Post
I got a quilt from Enlightened Equipment which I love. 900 down fill, 30 degrees and I think it's 18 or 19 ounces (510 to 540 grams). I would recommend them if you can swing $250 or more.
I have this same quilt, which I bought for a cross-US tour. I consider it the best outdoor equipment purchase I've ever made. On that trip I used it in sub-freezing conditions in blowing snow in the North Cascades and it worked fantastic. Later in 100F+ scorching heat in the Midwest, it was perfect as well for when the nights finally cooled off enough to want to through something over. And since I never actually slept on it, it stayed clean still hasn't needed to be laundered.
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Old 04-30-17, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Doug64 View Post
You may be technically correct, but check out the latest generation of Primaloft sleeping bags. I don't think the weight difference is significant. I'll take a 2-3 oz. weight penalty for the advantages that synthetic bags and jackets offer over down.

Here again it is all a matter of preference. I've used down bags for years mountaineering, and still have a couple in the closet. Once good synthetics came out we made the switch.
I might try at some point. Washability is the other negative (besides cost) for down, on my checklist. Cost of my down bag is already covered. But a synthetic might be possibility for a very-long tour where multiple cleanings on the road are in the mix.

To date my longest tour has been 105 days and I did wash my bag midway(ish). It did take awhile and I'm sure not as simple as a synthetic.

Last edited by BigAura; 04-30-17 at 04:48 PM.
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Old 04-30-17, 07:39 PM
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I don't use the minimum when it comes to sleeping. Through experience with quilts I've decided that a sleeping bag with a hood and a good side zip is what I need. But I don't like the confinement of a mummy bag so I use a Montbell ultralight super spiral down hugger #3 that weights 22oz.

https://backpackinglight.com/montbel..._3_bag_review/
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Old 04-30-17, 08:28 PM
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For 2-season camping Jacks R Better Serria Stealth quilt - 40F, 18oz, 800 dri-down. Has a Velcro head hole so also services as a wearable down poncho for the chilly evenings/mornings at camp. +2oz for a down hood (poncho and sleeping modes). For the third season, I pair/layer it with an equal weight/rated Montbell Down Hugger #5... together good into the 20s (backpacking).
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Old 04-30-17, 09:55 PM
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Another Enlightened Equipment fan. Mine is about 1 lb. 900 down does cost quite a bit more.
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Old 04-30-17, 11:06 PM
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I've had a Jacks R Better quilt for several years now. It's about 21 oz. and rated for 25 degrees. If I were to replace it, I'd go with an Enlightened Equipment quilt. The baffling strategies and sewing tricks are superior.
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Old 05-01-17, 07:53 AM
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I've been using the military issue modular bag for awhile now, but without the thinner inner bag. I mostly got it for it's goretex bivy cover, but the synthetic bag is very decent too.
I'm very interested in the newer "waterproof" down, but haven't really researched it much yet.
I know Prima-Loft is very good too, have some snow pants made with it, but down just has a certain something. It just seems warmer, especially if you're trying to warm up, after getting chilled good.
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Old 05-01-17, 09:57 AM
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I'm another Enlightened fan, I've used my quilt an easy 300 nights or so over the last few years.

In my mind, there are certain legitimate reasons to use a synthetic bag, but they are few and relatively specialized. The whole animal thing does squick me out a bit (As a vegetarian, I'm not so stoked on having to use an animal product.)

Also, for certain conditions, where you'll be damp for long periods of time, synthetic does make more sense, I've had backpacking where I've gone three or fours days without ever emerging from the fog. Continual exposure to atmospheric moisture does take it's toll on down. But it also takes it's toll on me.

Other than that, down is still lighter, packs more compactly and lasts longer than synthetics. A well made down bag (or quilt) will last a lifetime with minimal intervention, synthetic insulation breaks down much more quickly.

I also wouldn't worry about washing it on the road, I use my quilt hard, I don't use a liner, and regularly sleep in it without bathing, covered in dirt from fieldwork, I wash it once a year and it's fine. Unless I was on a really long tour, I'd just wash it when I got back home.

While I love my Revelation and live out of it several months of the year, I'll be honest and say the only time I don't have the foot box zipped is when I'm sleeping inside on someone's floor (or couch, if I'm lucky.) I've also only ever used it as an underquilt for my hammock once. If I had to buy again, I'd sacrifice the zipped footbox, save a few ounces and get an Enigma.
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Old 05-01-17, 10:04 AM
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Maybe 1 lb? With the bag. Its a north face synthetic 55 degree bag. Summer only. Works well.
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Old 05-01-17, 10:58 AM
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I've been thinking about a quilt, especially since I now camp mostly with a hammock, but my 35 year old Marmot down bag won't wear out. I use dry bags for clothing and sleeping gear (including the the hammock and underquilt), but I don't use compression bags. I find that compression bags leave me with cylinder or ball shaped objects that don't back so well. In experience it works better to pack things relatively loosely in dry bags in order to make full use of every nook and cranny.
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Old 05-01-17, 01:52 PM
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Originally Posted by BicycleCrazy View Post
What it the weight of sleeping bag you've used for touring?
winter touring or summer touring?
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Old 05-02-17, 11:17 AM
  #24  
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Weight of a sleeping bag is a consideration but so is compressability. I look for simple gear with a minimum of zippers for example. If your stuff takes up too much space, soon you need bigger bags. While I don't go ultra light, I am light and selecting new gear, look at weight and space requirements.
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Old 05-04-17, 08:51 AM
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